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Naval Fighters

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Grumman F6F Hellcat

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The Grumman F6F Hellcat was the most important Naval aircraft in WWII. Without it the Pacific war would have had a very protracted conclusion. The F6F was built to Roy Grumman's simple design philosophy "Grumman will only build an easily produced, maintained and reliable combat aircraft that can be readily mastered by a 200-hour, war-time pilot trained to fly from a carrier, engage in successful combat, sustain combat damage, return to the carrier, and land his aircraft after dark so that he can be available for combat again the next day." Because the F6F was all that, it earned Grumman the nick name "The Ironworks." Grumman built 12,275 Hellcats during WWII in its successful effort of clearing the skys of the Japanese. The XF6F was first flown on 8 August 1942 and the production version, the F6F-3 flew on 3 October 1942. The F6F-3 first entered squadron service with VF-9 on 16 January 1943 and drew its first blood over Marcus Island on 31 August 1943. The Hellcat shot down 5,156 enemy aircraft, for a kill-to-loss ratio of 19-to-1, while producing 307 aces. This was the aircraft of the largest one-day air battle of all time, the "Marianas Turkey Shoot" where more than 540 Hellcats fought 440 Japanese naval aircraft backed by up to 600 Japanese Army aircraft. Result was 354 enemy aircraft kills were claimed by the Hellcats while only 16 F6Fs were lost to Japanese aircraft. The Hellcat would see combat as photo birds (F6F-3P/5Ps) and night fighters (F6F-3E/3N/5E/5Ns) too as well as the improved F6F-5 fighter.

The book covers the F6Fs development, testing, and production written by Grumman's test pilot "Corky" Meyer. This is followed by technical details and a running combat narrative. The Marines, British, French, and European action is covered as well as training command during and after WWII and sections on post war, reserve, drones, and Hellcat prey.

McDonnell F2H-3/4 Big Banjo

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The F2H-3/4 Banshee ("Big Banjo") was a direct outgrowth of the F2H-1 and F2H-2 series of Korean war fighter and recon jets (see Naval Fighters #73 Early Banshees). It became the US Navy's first single seat all-weather carrier interceptor. To satisfy its mission the F2H-3/4 was required to have a significant increase in range. To accomplish this the internal fuel capacity was more than doubled by stretching the fuselage by 8 feet 1.6 inches. This gave the F2H-3/4 a combat range with tip tanks of 1,490 nautical miles. In addition to the fuselage extension, the tail surfaces of the F2H-3/4 were also redesigned. The horizontal tail was moved down to the rear of the fuselage tail cone and given a 10 degree dihedral. To accommodate the enlarged radar unit the four nose-mounted cannons were moved aft along the lower fuselage sides. The difference in the F2H-3 and F2H-4 was in the radar. The F2H-3 used the Westinghouse APQ-41 with a 28" dish and the F2H-4 was equipped with the Hughes APG-37 radar. The F2H-4 further differs from the -3 by having up-rated J34-WE-38 engines. The larger engines allowed for a service ceiling of 56,000 ft. The aircraft also had increased wing stations and was capable of carrying Sidewinder air-to-air missiles. The aircraft were active with the Navy and Marines from 1952 through 1959. It was operated by 31 active Navy and Marine squadrons which histories appear in the book along with squadron insignia. The book also includes a chapter on Royal Canadian F2H-3s.

Curtiss SOC Seagull

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

128 pages, 280 b/w photos, diagrams and technical manual illustrations. Concise visual history of Curtiss-Wright's classic 1930s through WWII single-engined scout observation biplane. The Seagull was significant for incorporating full-span automatic wing slots in combination with hand operated upper wing flaps which combined to give improved performance need for shipboard operations. SOCs could be configured with floats or wheeled undercarriages and was capable and versatile - so much so that it replaced the failed SO3C Seamew that had been produced to supersede the OS2U Kingfisher that had previously supplanted the SOC in frontline service! Includes developmental and unit service histories, 2 pages of modeler's references.

Lockheed R6O/R6V Constitution (Naval Fighters)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The Lockheed R6V Constitution was a large, propeller-driven, double-decker transport aircraft developed in the 1940s by Lockheed as a long-range, high capacity transport and airliner for the U.S. Navy.

The first time I saw this aircraft was in a photo of a Bearcat and it was in the back ground.

This book covers this and more.

USN/USMC Two-Seat Skyhawks

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

Almost from the very beginning, Douglas had suggested to the Navy that a two-seat version of the Skyhawk would be useful, both as a trainer as well as for some types of combat missions where a second pair of eyes might be useful. These requests had always been turned down by the Navy out of budgetary considerations. However, in 1964 the Navy changed its mind and convinced the Department of Defense to allocate money for the building of two prototypes of a two-seat Skyhawk. One of the more convincing arguments for the utility of a two-seat Skyhawk trainer was that those single-seat Skyhawks then being used for stateside training could be released for combat duty in Vietnam.

This book covers this and more.

Curtiss F9C Sparrowhawk Airship Fighters (Naval Fighters, 79)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Richard Hoffman

The F9C was the first fighter specifically designed to be dropped from mother airships. The plane would be lowered in the air stream hanging from a trapeze below the airship. The pilot would release the hook mechanism and fly to defend its airship. It would be retrieved inside the airship by hooking again on the trapeze. The Air Force also tried this and it is covered in this book.

Bell XFL-1 Airabonita (Naval Fighters, 81)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Tommy H Thomason

The Bell XFL-1 Airabonita was a experimental shipboard interceptor aircraft developed for the US Navy. It was similar to and a parallel development of the land-based P-39 Airacobra, differing mainly in the use of a tail wheel undercarriage in place of the P-39's tricycle gear. It first flew on May 13, 1940. Only one prototype was manufactured BuNo 1588.

Douglas TBD-1 Devastator (Naval Fighters, Number seventy-one)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The US Navy first carrier-based monoplane was a torpedo bomber rather than a nimble fighter. It was also the first all-metal, high performance aircraft and the first aircraft with hydraulically folding wing.

This book takes you back to the early days of the Navy with a new weapon on the new and untried aircraft carriers when the Battle ship was king.

There are a lot of photos, drawing, cut away along with ship and squadron history.

TEMCO TT-1 Pinto (Naval Fighters #72)


Not Indexed Yet Mark Frankel

Temco TT-1 Pinto was nick-named "Tinker Toy" developed as a private venture, the Temco Pinto primary jet trainer made its first flight March 26, 1956. The navy ordered 14 as TT-1 to conduct a full-scale study on the feasibility of using a jet aircraft for primary training.

1/05/2007

Martin P5M Marlin Patrol Seaplane

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Richard Hoffman , Steve Ginter

The lineage of Martin and the flying boat can be traced back to the PBM-4 of 1941. Navy's last flying boat and the end of a long era of seaplanes in the US Navy. This book covers the complete history of the Martin P5M Marlin aircraft development, construction, systems, squadron, interior, exterior weapons, and stores. It includes Marlin losses and casualties, photos of the catwalks, and some of the hazard of working on a seaplane over the water. There are also sections on the US Coast Guard and French use plus modelers guide.

Curtiss XBTC-2 Eggbeater

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Bob Kowalski

Curtiss Model 98 XBTC-2 was designed for a request for a single seat dive/torpedo bomber in 1942. A Wright R 3350 with a four bladed prop should power the -1, a P&W R-4360 with 3-bladed contra props the -2. Work on both variants was slow, to other commitments and stability problems were encountered during wind tunnel testing. The -2 was first flown on January 20th 1945, all work on the -1 was terminated since 1943. The crash of the first prototype in February 1947 and of the second in August 1947 ended the development.

March 1945, the Navy ordered 10 relatively minor derivatives of the XBTC-2. They had 2,500-horsepower Wright R-3350-4 engines turning single-rotation propellers. Progress was faster on this model, and the first flight was made in January 1946. Gross weight was 19,072 pounds, and max speed was 297 mph at sea level and 330 mph at 17,000 feet. Armament was two 20mm cannon, eight five-inch rockets and one 2,000-pound bomb or a torpedo.

Vought TA-7C/EA-7L/A-7K Twosair

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

In 1972, Vought modified the first TF-41-powered A-7E (BuNo 156801) as a tandem, two-seat combat trainer demonstrator. The two-seater flew for the first time on August 19, 1972, piloted by John Konrad.

After demonstrating the two-seat Corsair II at various naval air stations, Vought was awarded a contract to modify 60 TF30-powered Corsair IIs (24 A-7Bs and 36 A-7Cs) into two-seat trainers, to be designated TA-7C. The first converted TA-7C flew for the the first time on December 17, 1976 and was delivered to the Navy on January 31, 1977. The TA-7Cs were delivered to VA-122 and to VA-174.

This book includes US Air National Guard A-7K Greek TA-7Hs, Portugese TA-7Ps, and Thai TA-7Es

Early Banshees F2H-1/2/2B/2N/2P

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

In 1980, I published the second book in the Naval Fighter Series, the McDonnell Banshee F2H-1, 2, 3 and 4. It was 78 pages with 95 photos and over 150 profiles. It was reprinted two times and has been out of print for more than 15 years this volume has replaced at least part of it. This volume covers F2H-1, F2H-2/2B/2N/2P Banshees. The F2H-3 and F2H-4 will be covered by a future volume.

Martin P4M-1/-1Q Mercator (Naval Fighters Series Vol 37)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

This book attempts to delineate the history of the Martin P4M Mercator. It is not by any means a complete narrative, due to the secret nature of the Mercator's career and its importance to the Cold War. Through mishaps and shoot-downs, the nineteen ship production run flew clandestine electronic intelligence missions against China, North Korea, Russia, and Vietnam until 1960. Many of the documents, drawings and photos used in this book were declassified for this publication as late as 6-17-96. Even so, I trust that all that acquires this book will thrill at the beauty and gracefulness of the big Martin.

Bell HSL ASW Helicopter (Naval Fighters #70)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Tommy H Thomason

The Bell company won a Navy design competition in June 1950 for a helicopter specifically for anti-submarine warfare. This design, Bell Model 61, was the only Bell helicopter using the tandem-rotor layout ; it was powered by a 2400 hp Pratt & Whitney R-2800-50 engine and was intended to carry air-to-surface missiles such as the Fairchild Petrel, as well as dipping ASDIC. Three XHSL-1 were ordered the first of these flying on March 4, 1953, followed by a production contract for 78, including 18 destined for the Britain's Fleet Air Arm.

Fleet Whales Skywarrior Pt.2

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Bruce Cunningham

Volume two covers the operational use of the aircraft by the US Navy. This book covers the history of the squadrons, the special squadrons, and the men that flew the Whales.

Naval Fighters Number Thirty Douglas XSB2D-1 & BTD-1 Destroyer

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Bob Kowalski , Steve Ginter

Bob Kowalski continues the saga of the bomber Torpedo (BT) program and the similar Scout Bomber (SB) program with the obscure story of the Douglas XSB2D-1 and BTD-1 "Destroyer".

The United States was still at peace when the Navy issued a requirement for a design to serve with the fleet as both a successor to the SBD, which would be nearing obsolescence, and as a possible replacement for the SB2C, which was undergoing what can charitably be called a prolonged proportional development period. To meet this requirement, two prototypes of the SXB2D-1 were ordered by the Navy on 30 June 1941.

Naval Fighters Number Forty-Eight : Kaiser Fleetwings XBTK-1

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Bob Kowalski

The Kaiser Fleetwings XBTK-1 was initially designed to meet a 1943 Navy requirement for a "single-seat carrier based high performance dive bomber." As was the normal war-time practice, design studies were requested from companies without a major production model and, with the Navy's acceptance of the proposal from the Fleetwings company, the design was designated XBK-1.

Boeing XF8B-1 Five-In-One Fighter (Naval Fighters)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Rick Koehnen

The F/A 18 Hornet was not the first Naval Aircraft designed to meet all the Navy needs. The XF8B-1 was another Boeing called it the "Five-in-one" fighter (fighter, interceptor, dive bomber, torpedo or horizontal bomber). This aircraft had the ability of caring two 1600lb bombs in a internal weapons bay and two more on strong point under the wing or a pair of 2000lb torpedoes under the wing. Six 50 cal. machine gun in the wing or 20 mm cannons. It was powered by XR4360-10 Wasp Major with a contra-rotating propeller.

Grumman F9F -6P/8P Photo Cougar

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

Next to the helicopter the photo aircraft are among the less glamorous aircraft abroad ship but are some of the most important because with out them the ship would be blind.

F9F-6P/8P photo Cougar replaced the F9F-5P photo Panther in two Navy and 2 USMC squadrons in the 1954. It was replaced in 1956 by the more capable F9F-8P photo cougar of witch 100 aircraft were built. F9F-8P's were replaced by the supersonic F8U-1P photo Crusader starting in 1958 with the last F9F-8P retiring from the fleet in early 1961. Two Navy squadrons provided 3-aircraft detachments to both the Atlantic and the Pacific Fleet Carriers.

Curtiss XBT2C-1 Bomber/Torpedo Aircraft Prototype

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Bob Kowalski

This is the fifth book in the series of World War II aircraft designed under the Navy's Bomber Torpedo requirements. The other books are Naval Fighters #24 Martin AM-1/1Q Mauler, #30 Douglas XSB2D/BTD-1 Destroyer, #36 Douglas XTB2D Skypirate and #48 Kaiser Fleetwings XBTK-1.

In the eyes of the editor, the Curtiss XBT2C-1 was an attractive aircraft in flight. But these good looks masked the true identity.

Grumman F9F Part 3 Navy Panthers Korea and Beyond

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

Volume three of the Panther story focuses on the use of the aircraft by the United States Navy. This was the first Grumman jet aircraft to go to sea.

This book covers the History of the squadrons and the men that flew the Navy Panthers.

Some photos show the hazards of landing on a straight deck carrier.

Douglas A-4M Skyhawk

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The last version of the Skyhawk series to be built, the A-4M Skyhawk II, was obviously the most capable. While the original Skyhawks were designed as a lightweight delivery platform for nuclear weapons, the "Mighty Mikes" were refined into the ultimate close air support weapon to protect the "Mud Marines." With the Hughes Angie Rate bombing System installed it was arguably the world's best close air support jet aircraft ever built.

Ironically, the A-4M was the only Skyhawk version, other than the A-4A, to not see combat. The A-4M first entered service in 1971 as the Vietnam War was grinding to a halt and left front line service in February 1990 prior to the Gulf War. However, foreign versions of the A-4M did see combat in the Middle East. These were the Israeli A-4Ns and the Kuwaiti A-4Kus. Marine A-4Ms stayed forward-deployed in Japan throughout their active service life in readiness for a war that never was.

Douglas A-4A/B USMC/USMCR/USNR Skyhawk

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter , Steven Albright

USMC/USMCR/USNR Douglas A-4A/B Skyhawks is the companion volume to Naval Fighters Number Forty-Nine, the Douglas A-4A/B Skyhawk in Navy Service. The Navy volume contains 61 pages of development, aircraft description details and drawings, that pertain to Marine A-4A/Bs.

Although much fewer Marine squadrons were equipped with the A-4A/Bs than Navy squadrons, the type still saw extensive usage by fourteen active duty Marine squadrons. The aircraft were ultimately assigned to fourteen Navy and Marine reserve bases.

Douglas D-558-2 Skyrocket

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Scott Libis

"Comic book stuff" was the typical response on one would draw in 1938 when the subject of rocket propulsion came up. To most, the subject of rocket power conjured up images of Buck Rogers and the Saturday afternoon matinee. Rocketry was the flight of fantasy science fiction writers used to transport their audiences to new worlds. But it was also during this time that visionaries like Dr. Robert Goddard and Dr. Theodor Von Karman worked developing their theories of rocket science.

The D-558 program was a Douglas Aircraft Company contract with the U.S. Navy and NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics), intended to produce an aircraft for the purpose of exploring transonic and supersonic flight.

Douglas A-4E/F Skyhawk in Marine Service (Naval Fighters, Number Fifty-Two)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter , Steven Albright

Douglas A-4 E/F Skyhawks in Marine Service is the companion volume to Naval Fighters Number Fifty-One. Douglas A-4 E/F Skyhawks In Navy Service. The Navy volume contains 41 pages of development, aircraft description details and drawings, as well as 19 pages of armament details and drawings that pertain to Marine
A-4E/Fs.

Although fewer Marine squadrons were equipped with the A-4 E/Fs than Navy squadrons, the type still saw extensive usage in Vietnam. The close air support that these aircraft provided to our deployed troops were invaluable and saved countless American lives.

Lockheed T2V/T-1A Seastar

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

Lockheed had an early lock on military jet trainer production in the United States with its very successful two-seat derivative of the P-80/F-80 Shooting Star, the T-33A/TV-2. As good as the T-Bird was, Lockheed believed a much more capable trainer could be developed from the basic T-33 design. As a private venture, under the guidance of Kelly Johnson, Lockheed sought to improve the instructor's visibility and the aircraft's low speed handling characteristics. These changes, along with a redesigned and strengthened landing gear, would allow the aircraft to be considered for a carrier trainer.

Naval Fighters Number Forty-Four Grumman's Mach-2 International F11F-1F Supertiger


Not Indexed Yet Corwin Meyer

The J79 powered Mach 2 Supertiger derivative of the F-11F was developed into a world class performer and was marketed as such. It impressed the foreign aviators who tested it so much that it became their first choice. That is until the political-financial giant known as Lockheed wielded its weight world wide. Lockheed's F-104 eventually dominated world sales, but was never a safe and sane choice as history would prove.

1/09/1998

Naval Fighters Number Forty-Five Douglas A3D Skywarrior Part One Design/Structures/Testing


Not Indexed Yet Bruce Cunningham

Another child of the "fabulous fifties" was the big-bad A3D Skywarrior, affectionately know as "Whale" or "Killer Whale". It was not the most glamorous, but became arguably the most utilitarian carrier-based aircraft to come out of the 50's. With Hughes Aircraft's current stables of twelve whales, it will certainly outlive the few QF-4 drones still flying. As a test aircraft, size and speed as well as ease of maintenance have kept the Skywarrior in demand.

1/05/1998

Naval Fighters Number Forty Grumman F11F Tiger


Not Indexed Yet Corwin Meyer

The full story of the Grumman Tiger and Super Tiger has only been told in part by non-Grumman aviation buffs and historians who wrote from second or third-hand information.

Although it is over forty years later, this compendium has been written and documented by the principal Grumman and Blue Angel actors who participated in the development of those fine aircraft that came upon the scene at a very difficult but interesting era for both Grumman and the Navy.

1/12/1997

Naval Fighters Number Thirty-Three XTBU-1 & TBY-2 Sea Wolf

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

In 1939 with war on the horizon, the U.S. Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics sent the aviation industry a request for proposal for a new torpedo-bomber (VTB). The competition was won by Grumman with its XTBF-1 proposal. Known as the Avenger, two XTBF-1 prototypes were ordered in the spring of 1940. Vought also had a promising proposal and was awarded a contract for one XTBU-1 prototype.

Naval Fighters Number Thirty-Six Douglas XTB2D-1 Skypirate

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Bob Kowalski , Steve Ginter

Bob Kowalski continues the saga of the Bomber Torpedo (BT) program and the similar Scout Bomber (SB) program with the obscure story of the Douglas XTB2D-1 "SkyPirate". The story started in Naval Fighters #24, Martin AM-1/-1Q Mauler and continued with Naval Fighters #30, Douglas XSB2D-1 and BTC-1 "Destroyer".

Naval Fighters Number Thirty-Four Convair XP5Y-1 & R3Y-1/-2 Tradewind

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

On 20 December 1944, the industry was asked to enter a design competition for a 105,000 pound patrol boat powered by four Pratt & Whitney R-2800 radials. In January 1945, the proposal was amended to include anti-shipping, anti-submarine, and air-search and rescue. Ultimately, the project was cancelled when the submitted designs were deemed marginally superior to existing aircraft. The concept was resurrected on 27 December 1945 in the form of a 165,000 pound flying boat with improved hull design and four turboprop engines to significantly improve performance.

Grumman XF5F-1 & XP-50 Skyrocket (Naval Fighters Number Thirty-One)


Not Indexed Yet Bob Martin

The Skyrocket story was originally published in the American Aviation Historical Society (AAHS) Journal in 1989.

All of the comic book reading public during the 1940's followed the adventures of "Blackhawk" and his mighty men as they conquered the world of evil. Those of us with a mindbent toward things aeronautical knew that it was not "Superman" or "Batman" who held the keys to a crime-free society, bring on "Blackhawk." Dressed in daring dark uniforms, the dashing figures of this 1940's version of the "A-Team" were mounted on the very latest of aircraft. Through the paint brush the artist portrayed an entire squadron of snub-nosed twin engine fighters which those of us old enough to remember know that only a single actual aircraft existed for the artist to illustrate, the Grumman XF5F-1 Skyrocket.

1/05/1995

Ryan FR-1 Fireball And XF2R-1 Darkshark (Naval Fighters 28)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

It was no secret to the U.S. Navy that jet and rocket aircraft were being developed in Europe, and that once fully developed, would be of superior performance than piston engine aircraft. Because of these facts, the Navy initiated investigations into alternative solutions to counter these new jets. By late 1942, the Navy decided upon a composite-powered fighter. In December, ADM John S. McCain released the proposal to nine manufacturers, including Ryan. The Ryan proposal was accepted and a contract for three prototypes and one static test article was placed on 11 February 1943.

North American FJ-4 / 4B Fury (Naval Fighters, No. 25)


Not Indexed Yet

This book covers the development, testing, and squadron histories of the 33-Navy units and 13-Marine units that flew the North American FJ-4/4B Fury. The original FJ-4 was given exclusively to the Marines and the Bullpup capable FJ-4B "Fury Bravo" was used by the Navy as a ground attack aircraft. Many attack pilots thought it was a better attack platform then the A4D/A-4 Skyhawk that replaced it, but the higher cost of the Fury sealed its fate. Pilots nicknamed it the "Cadillac" whereas the A-4s two most popular nicknames were "Tinker Toy" and Scooter". 260 b&w photos and 24-illustrations.

1/10/1994

Naval Fighters Number Twenty-Seven Convair XFY-1 Pogo


Not Indexed Yet Skeets Coleman

In 1947, both the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Navy sponsored VTOL design studies called project Hummingbird. The rapid development of increasingly powerful powerplants had reached the point where a true VTOL aircraft was in the realm of possibility. The U.S. Navy's firsthand experiences with Japan's Kamikaze taught them the vulnerability of their great mobile peacekeepers, the carrier. Because of this experience the Navy felt that the only way to protect any naval presence in enemy waters was to equip all ships with a VTOL fighter.

1/09/1994

Grumman Hu-16 Albatross (Naval Fighters Series No 11)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steven J Ginter

The Grumman HU-16 Albatross started out as a company venture in the late forties and became such a success that it has been used by more than two dozen armed forces throughout the world. It has become one of those hand-me-down aircraft like the venerable DC-3/C-47 and is still in use today.

Grumman XF10F-1 Jaguar Swing-Wing (Consign) (Naval Fighters)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Corwin Meyer

The unusual and innovative swing-wing Jaguar program ended up being a one airplane project even though during its development, orders were placed for one hundred and twelve aircraft. That ship, BuNo 124435, would only be flown by one pilot, Corwin "Corky" Meyer. When the program concluded in 1953 after over a year of flight testing, the flight test example 124435 along with the number two ship 124436, which was some 90% complete, were shipped to the Naval Air Material Center, Philadelphia, for use in testing barriers and barricades. The static test article, which was some 60% complete, was shipped to the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland for use as a target.

Naval Fighters Number Twenty-Two North American AJ Savage


Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The North American AJ "Savage" came into being as a direct result of the greatest Navy and Government controversy since Billy Mitchell and the Battleships. This controversy was over the future Nuclear strike capabilities of the Navy, if any.

1/11/1992

Naval Fighters, No. 21: Chance Vought V-173 & Xf5U-1 Flying Pancakes


Not Indexed Yet

The "Flying Pancake", "Flying Flapjack", "Flying Saucer", and "Zimmer's Skimmer" were all names used to describe Charles H. Zimmerman's unorthodox V-173 and XF5U-1 aircraft. Two other descriptions: the world's fastest and slowest-flying airplane and the world's first vertical takeoff and landing airplane, might have been used to describe the XF5U1 that was built but never flown. Zimmerman's brainchild was designed to do just that, but was never given the chance.

1/07/1992

Naval Fighters Number Twenty Grumman Af Guardian


Not Indexed Yet Bob Kowalski

In 1953, the mainstay of carrier-based anti-submarine warfare (ASW) forces in the Navy were represented by a pair of Grumman AF-2W and AF-2S Guardians flying as a hunter-killer team and operating from an escort carrier of the Commencement Bay(CVE-105) class. The Guardian's wingspan of 60 feet, length of 43 feet 5 inches and height of 16 feet 7 inches, made it the largest single-engine piston-driven airplane ever to operate from an aircraft carrier.

1/10/1991

Vought's F-8 Crusader: Navy Fighter Squadrons (Naval Fighters Series No 19)


Not Indexed Yet Steven J Ginter

The photos in this edition are black and white. First published in 1990, this book is a squadron-by-squadron history of the "Last Gunfighter", Vought's F-8 Crusader. It covers the 69 Navy units that flew the "MiG Master" including squadron patches with additional pages on operating the Crusader in Vietnam. During the Vietnam War, F-8 squadrons deployed 59 times from carrier decks off Vietnam and were responsible for downing 16 MiG-17s, two MiG-21s, plus two probable MiG-17s. This is an excellent account of a true warrior. "When your out of F-8's your out of fighters." Over 600 photos.

1/09/1990

North American Rockwell T-2 Buckeye (Naval Fighters, Volume 15)


Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The photos in this edition are black and white. First published in 1987, the T-2 Buckeye book covers the development of this all-purpose jet trainer from the Navy's solicitation to industry in 1956 through its operations and squadron usage with the US Navy, Marines, Venezuela and Greece. It was originally built as a single engine jet, the T2J-1/T-2A, but had inadequate power. A second engine was added and it became the over-powered T-2B. It was a tremendously over-designed and robust aircraft, perfect for students and virtually impervious to excess Gs. Late in life it was used as a spin trainer for fleet Tomcat pilots. 137 photos and 33 illustrations.

1/10/1987

Convair T-29/C-131 Samaritan

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The T-29/C-131 series of aircraft was one of the military's many cost-saving examples of purchasing existing civil and commercial designs for their utility and transport needs. The first military Convair-Liner was accepted on 8 March 1950. Military production eventually eclipsed civil production with the last Convair-Liner built being a military Canadair CL-66B, which was delivered on 3 March 1961. This aircraft was the last of 568 military Convair-Liners built.

Douglas F4d Skyray (Naval Fighters)


Not Indexed Yet Nick Williams

The photos in this edition are black and white. First published in 1986, the book covers the tailless bat-winged Douglas F4D Skyray, which had such an incredible rate of climb that it gained a secondary mission as part of the USAF Air Defense Command in California and Florida. Known as the Ford by Navy pilots it had a protracted development period due to the failure of its first engine the J-40. In spite of these teething problems before receiving the J-57 it would use in the fleet, the Skyray set two world speed records for the 3km and 100km courses as well as several time-to-climb records. The fighter served with distinction with 25 Navy units, 8 Marine units and NACA/NASA. The radar equipped and missile armed interceptor was retired from active service in 1964. 418 photo, 52 illustrations and extensive squadron histories.

1/12/1986

McDonnell F3H Demon (Naval Fighters Series Vol 12)


Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The McDonnell F3H Demon is probably the least remembered modern Naval fighter, even though it was our first true all-weather missile fighter. When the weather prevented the agile F8U, F4D and F11F from flying the Demon could still be launched. A glamorous plane the Demon was not, primarily due to its lack of performance. The F3H remained underpowered throughout its career, so much so that it was tagged by fleet pilots as the "lead sled."

1/05/1985

Chance Vought F6U Pirate: Naval Fighters Number Nine

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

It was 1944, and a new age in aviation was dawning in the European skies, the jet age. As more German jets appeared in combat, it became a foregone conclusion that Japan would be producing them too. These facts prompted the Navy to issue a requirement for carrier jet fighters. In late 1944 BuAer sent requests to several manufacturers for jet proposals. From all the proposals submitted, BuAer technical desk chose three designs to be developed. This is the story of one of the three: The Chance Vought F6U Pirate.

Chance Vought F7U Cutlass: Naval Fighters


Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The Chance Vought F7U Cutlass was the most radical fighter design ever to achieve fleet service. At the aircraft's unveiling, the press was so stunned by its unusual appearance that the plane was given such nicknames as bat-like, dart-like, praying mantis, preying petrodactyl, giant arrowhead and flying wing. The bold design of the Cutlass gave the Navy a pioneer airframe which was to test and develop many systems that are still in use today.

1/12/1982

McDonnell Fh-1 Phantom (Naval Fighters Series No 3)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The photos in this edition are black and white. First published in 1981, the book covers the Navy's first jet aircraft to operate from a carrier, the McDonnell FD-1/FH-1 Phantom. The underpowered twin jet fighter would prove, along with North American's FJ-1, the feasibility of operating jets from carriers. It was operated by VF-17A/VF-171, VF-172, VMF-122 and the "Flying Leathernecks" demonstration team as well as the reserves. 48 photos, 6 illustrations and 21 profiles are included.

Consolidated PB2Y Coronado (Naval Fighters, 85)


Not Indexed Yet Richard Hoffman

The PB2Y Coronado was a large flying boat patrol bomber designed by Consolidated Aircraft. After deliveries of the PBY Catalina, also a Consolidated aircraft, began in 1935, the United States Navy began planning for the next generation of patrol bombers. Orders for two prototypes, the XPB2Y-1 and the Sikorsky XPBS-1, were placed in 1936; the prototype Coronado first flew in December 1937.

After trials with the XPB2Y-1 prototype revealed some stability issues, the design was finalized as the PB2Y-2, with a large cantilever wing, twin tail, and four Pratt & Whitney R-1830 radial engines. The two inner engines were fitted with four-bladed reversible pitch propellers; the outer engines had standard three-bladed feathering props. (However, note the three-bladed prop on the inner engine in the picture at the left.) Like the PBY Catalina before it, the PB2Y's wingtip floats retracted to reduce drag and increase range.

Naval Fighters Number Five North American T-28 Trojan The T-28 in Navy, Air Force, & Foreign Service


Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

11 x 8 paperback. Over 175 photos, color & B/W, profiles showing paint schemes & markings, detail drawings, scaled 4-view drawings, kit reviews. 65 pages. Includes material on US Navy, Air Force & Foreign Service variant plus a special section on the prototype YAT-28E turbo prop model.

USMC Panthers, Grumman F9F, Part 2: Includes Blue Angels, Reserves, and Argentina - Naval Fighters No. 60


Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

Volume two of the Panther story focuses on the usage of the aircraft by the United States Marines. In Korea the F9F, like its propeller-driven counterparts (AD Skyraiders and F-4U Corsairs), were utilized primarily for close air support. The two squadrons employed for this task were VMF-311 and VMF-115. The only other Marine jets employed in the Korean conflict were a handful of McDonnell F2H-2P photo Banshees from VMJ/VMCJ-1 and the Douglas F3D-2 SkyKnight nightfighters of VMF(N)-513. Because the Marines used its Panthers as ground attack aircraft, many of the squadrons were redesignated from VMF (fighter) to VMA (attack) squadrons during the post-war period. Post-war usage of the Panther by the Marines was limited as the aircraft were quickly replaced by more capable jet aircraft.

Also included in this volume is coverage of Naval and Marine Reserve Panthers, the Blue Angels and the Argentine Navy's Panthers.

PV-1 Ventura and PV-2 Harpoon (Naval Fighters, 86)


Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The Lockheed Ventura PV-1 AND PV-2 Harpoon was a bomber and patrol aircraft of World War II, used by United States and British Commonwealth forces in several guises. It was developed from the Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar transport. It served with many other Nation as a replacement for the Lockheed Hudson bombers then in service with the Royal Air Force. The RAF ordered 675 Venturas in February 1940. They were delivered from mid-1942 onwards.

Naval Fighters Number 63 - Grumman Goose


Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The Grumman Goose was developed to satisfy the needs of 10 businessmen who wanted a modern replacement for the Loening Air Yacht and Commuter amphibians.

On 3 of July 1937, just 35 day after first flight the first Goose was delivered for the price of $60,000. This book talks about the many uses for the Goose. From Patrol to Hydrofoil test aircraft.

Vought F8U-3 Crusader III Super Crusader (Naval Fighters, 87)


Not Indexed Yet Tommy H Thomason

The Vought XF8U-3 Crusader III was an aircraft developed by Chance Vought as a successor to the successful F-8 Crusader program and as a competitor to the F-4 Phantom II. Though based in spirit on the F8U-1 and F8U-2, and sharing the older aircraft's designation in the old Navy system, the two aircraft shared few parts.

The "reluctant dragon": The Curtiss SO3C, seagull/seamew (Naval fighters)


Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

In early 1937, Curtiss and Vought, the Navy's two pre-war suppliers of fleet catapult scout floatplanes, were asked to submit bids for a high-speed replacement of the very successful SOC Seagull series. Navy design number 403 called for a mid-wing monoplane with a crew of two seated in tandem. The removable centerline float and outer wing floats could be replaced with optional fuselage-mounted landing gear. Because of cruiser and battleship deck and hangar space limitations, the specifications called for folding wings and wing floats all within a weight limitation of 6,350 pounds. However, the most critical design stipulation was the engine.

Grumman F8F Bearcat (Naval Fighters, No 80)


Not Indexed Yet Corwin Meyer

History of Grumman's last piston-engined carrier-capable fighter. Intended as a small high performance replacement for the FM2s operating from escort carriers, the Bearcat missed combat in WWII but served well with the US Navy until 1955. Covers the origins, development, variants and service history and includes detail photos and diagrams well describing the airframe and equipment, inside and out; 216 pages.

Naval Fighters Number 59 - Grumman F9F Panther Part One - Development Testing Structures


Not Indexed Yet Corwin Corky Meyer

The single-engine XF9F-2 Panther didn't just spring out of the fountain of Grumman's preliminary design team. The Navy inspected the mockups for the two prototypesin January 1946. The first flight was conducted on November 21, 1947. Because Grumman had declined the Navy's requirement to ship the Panther prototypes to the long runways of the Naval Air Test Center at Patuxent River to make their first flight, the Navy insisted that the first landing be made at the yet unfinished Idlewild (now JFK) airport's 8000 foot runway, which took the new protype over the densly-populated suburbs of New York City in a first and newly completed jet fighter.

North American FJ-3 / 3M Fury (Naval Fighters, 88)


Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

The North American FJ-2/-3 Fury were a series of swept-wing carrier-capable fighters for the United States Navy and Marine Corps. Based on the United States Air Force's F-86 Sabre, these aircraft featured folding wings, and a longer nose landing strut designed to both increase angle of attack upon launch and to absorb the shock of hard landings on an aircraft carrier deck. Although sharing a U.S. Navy designation with its distant predecessor, the straight-winged FJ-1 Fury, the FJ-2/-3 were wholly different aircraft. The FJ-4 Fury was a complete structural redesign of the FJ-3.

Grumman Navy F-111B Swing Wing (Naval fighters No. 41)


Not Indexed Yet Tommy H Thomason

In 1960, both the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Navy were developing requirements for new fighters. The Air Force was planning to replace the F-105 with a long-range, low-level supersonic, all-weather Tactical Strike Fighter to be operated from unpaved runways of 3,000 feet or less in length and capable to transatlantic ferry without refueling. The Navy needed an all-weather, carrier-based Fleet Defense Fighter with a big radar and six long-range air-to-air missiles. In 1961, these similar "Fighter" requirements were merged by the Secretary of Defense into one program, TFX, to save development costs and operating costs.

Douglas D-558-1 Skystreak (Naval fighters)


Not Indexed Yet Scott Libis

"Crimson test Tube", "Supersonic Test Tube" and "Flying Stove Pipe" were just some of the nicknames bestowed upon the D-558-1 over the years. Skystreak was the popular name given by the Douglas Aircraft Company. The Skystreak, sponsored by the U.S. Navy and NACA, was charged with exploring flight in the transonic region. Aircraft manufacturers had been making aircraft for some time capable of reaching the onset of transonic flight, where a phenomenon known as compressibility lay waiting.

This aircraft is currently on display at the Naval Aviation Museum at NAS Pensacola, Florida.

Martin PBM Mariner (Ginter Books)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

In addition to development, testing, variants, and detailed aircraft systems, this book tells each squadron’s history.

Douglas AD/A-1 Skyraider (Naval Fighters)

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Steve Ginter

Over 3,180 Skyraiders were produced in 20 different versions and modified further into at least 7 other variants. Learn about the development, testing and service of this versatile aircraft.

Convair PB4Y-2/P4Y-2 Privateer

Naval Fighters
Not Indexed Yet Nicholas A. Veronico

The Privateer was a heavily armed (6-twin .50 cal. machine gun turrets) 4-engine, long range, land-based, patrol bomber developed from the famous B-24/PB4Y-1 Liberator. It was responsible for sinking over 550 Japanese ships and shooting down almost 50 enemy aircraft. It usually operated alone but sometimes with a second Privateer on its missions lasting up to 11-12 hours at a time.

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