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Supermarine Spitfire references, articles and publications

Image of Spitfire V vs C.202 Folgore: Malta 1942 (Duel)

Spitfire V vs C.202 Folgore: Malta 1942 (Duel)

Duel Series Donald Nijoboer

The inability of the Italians and Germans to invade Malta proved decisive for Allied victory in the Mediterranean during World War II, as the islands provided the Allies with a base from which to project air power. Early Italian efforts to pound the islands into submission were supplemented by major German forces from January 1942 and in a few weeks the situation for the defenders reached a critical stage; in response, in March 1942 the first Spitfires were delivered to Malta. That April the Macchi C.202 was introduced to combat over Malta, the fighter downing its first Spitfire on 2 June. Throughout the summer C.202s fought over Malta escorting tiny formations of Cant Z.1007s, SM.79s and Ju 88s. The fighting subsided in August and September, but grew in strength with the arrival of more C.202s. In October the Regia Aeronautica could muster three Gruppi with a total of 74 C.202s. For ten days the Italians pressed a relentless attack before attrition brought the offensive to a halt. Throughout the bombing campaign the British were able to supply Malta with ever increasing numbers of Spitfires. By the end of June air commanders felt secure enough to pass one of the Spitfire squadrons to Egypt. Here, the Spitfire V would again encounter the C.202 in the long drive to expel the Germans and Italians from North Africa, then Sicily and Italy in 1943. Fully illustrated with specially commissioned artwork, this is the engaging story of the clash between two of World War II's finest piston-engine fighters in the skies over the Mediterranean and North Africa.

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Image of Fighting Hitler's Jets: The Extraordinary Story of the American Airmen Who Beat the Luftwaffe and Defeated Nazi Germany

Fighting Hitler's Jets: The Extraordinary Story of the American Airmen Who Beat the Luftwaffe and Defeated Nazi Germany

<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Robert-F.-Dorr/e/B001H6KXT4/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1">Robert F. Dorr</a>

Fighting Hitler's Jets brings together in a single, character-driven narrative two groups of men at war: on one side, American fighter pilots and others who battled the secret “wonder weapons” with which Adolf Hitler hoped to turn the tide; on the other, the German scientists, engineers, and pilots who created and used these machines of war on the cutting edge of technology. Written by Robert F. Dorr, renowned author of Zenith Press titles Hell Hawks!, Mission to Berlin, and Mission to Tokyo, the story begins with a display of high-tech secret weapons arranged for Hitler at a time when Germany still had prospects of winning the war. It concludes with Berlin in rubble and the Allies seeking German technology in order to jumpstart their own jet-powered aviation programs. Along the way, Dorr expertly describes the battles in the sky over the Third Reich that made it possible for the Allies to mount the D-Day invasion and advance toward Berlin. Finally, the book addresses both facts and speculation about German weaponry and leaders, including conspiracy theorists’ view that Hitler escaped in a secret aircraft at the war’s end. Where history and controversy collide with riveting narrative, Fighting Hitler’s Jets furthers a repertoire that comprises some of the United States’ most exceptional military writing.

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Image of Sky Tiger: The Story of Sailor Malan

Sky Tiger: The Story of Sailor Malan

Norman Franks

In less than 15 months Sailor Malan rose to be Britain s premier WWII fighter pilot. A born leader, superb shot and exceptional tactician Malan tested his skills over Dunkirk and later in his Spitfire during the Battle of Britain. Developing fighter tactics he rose to Station Commander at Biggin Hill and finished the war as a permanent figure in the gallery of great flyers.

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Image of 'SAILOR' MALAN: Battle Of Britain Legend: Adolph G. Malan

'SAILOR' MALAN: Battle Of Britain Legend: Adolph G. Malan

Philip Kaplan

I do not think that Malan could join a squadron without improving it, however good it was. Not by sword waving, but by a strength of mind and integrity that are at once recognizable and effective...he was the best pilot of the War' - Air Commodore Al Deere, C.B.E., D.S.O., D.F.C.Malan was thirty years of age during the Battle of Britain, old for a fighter pilot, but his maturity gave his leadership a firm authority. The Battle of Britain produced many airmen of great skill and accomplishment; high achievers who made their mark in one of history's most memorable and demanding campaigns. But only a few of these men distinguished themselves in such a way as to become legends in their own lifetimes. Among the greatest of these was Sailor Malan. Here is the story of this talented man, eloquently told by Philip Kaplan who manages to strike a balance between objectivity and reverence in order to commit Malan's story to paper. Featured too are a series of evocative black and white illustrations which supplement the descriptive text and work to create a real sense of the character of the man, flourishing as he did in this dramatic wartime context. As Malan continues to inspire young Aviators, this record looks set to preserve his legacy for a new generation of pilots as well as hardy Aviation enthusiasts.

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Precursor of the Blackbird

Volume 39, Issue 1, 1990, Air International

Alfred Price

In the first of a two-part "Warbird" feature, Dr Alfred Price tells the story of the versions of the Spitfire I that ushered in the concept of the unarmed photo-reconnaissance aircraft

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Image of THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN: LUFTWAFFE BLITZ (Images of War)

THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN: LUFTWAFFE BLITZ (Images of War)

<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Philip-Kaplan/e/B000APJYAM/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1">Philip Kaplan</a>

After its attack on Poland in 1939, Britain and France had declared war on Germany. The Germans were suddenly in a war they had risked and now had to fight, and they planned an invasion of Britain to destroy that enemy's potential for making war. The plan, Operation Sea Lion, called for implementation by the autumn of 1940 and depended on German forces defeating and eliminating the Royal Air Force, clearing the English Channel of British mines, dominating the coastal zone between occupied France and England with heavy artillery, and eliminating the Royal Navy as a threat.

German success relied heavily on its air force, the Luftwaffe, dealing with the R.A.F quickly and efficiently and gaining air superiority over Britain with a series of concentrated bombing attacks throughout the British Isles. Winston Churchill called what followed "the Battle of Britain" - fifteen weeks of aerial combats, much happening directly above the towns and villages of England. The threatened invasion never came. Herman Goring's vaunted air force failed to achieve the prerequisites for Sea Lion and Adolf Hitler was forced to call it off.

The Luftwaffe bombing raids on Britain continued, however, into mid-May 1941, resulting in an unprecedented fifty-seven night campaign of horror for the British people.

The airmen of Goring's bomber force, sometimes referred to as 'eagles', were a unique breed involved in a remarkable experience, a prolonged, dramatic, strategic bombing effort that was met and challenged by a relatively small force of R.A.F fighter pilots determined to do whatever it took to prevent the enemy invading. The ferocity of fight they put up left the German bomber crews in no doubt about the sort of threat they faced.

The Battle of Britain: Luftwaffe Blitz offers a gripping, graphic view of the routine repeated each day and night, from the summer of 1940 through the following spring, by the German bomber crews bringing their deadly cargoes to Britain. Through mainly German archival photos, it features images of the airmen on their French bases and in the skies over England; the aircraft they flew, fought and sometimes died in; their leaders; their targets and results; the R.A.F pilots and aircraft; and the losses. The images, from the Bundesarchiv and other German and British photographic sources, vividly convey a real sense of events as they played out, as do the compelling memories of many on both sides, participants and eyewitnesses to one of the most brutal sustained bombardments of the Second World War.

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Image of Spitfires & Yellow Tail Mustangs: The U.S. 52nd Fighter Group in WWII (Stackpole Military History Series)

Spitfires & Yellow Tail Mustangs: The U.S. 52nd Fighter Group in WWII (Stackpole Military History Series)

Tom Ivie

  • Story of one of the best fighter units in the Mediterranean theater, which earned two Distinguished Unit Citations and produced 21 aces
  • Vivid episodes of aerial combat during the key campaigns for Tunisia, Sicily, Italy, and more
  • Nicknamed "Yellow Tails" for the color markings on their aircraft
  • The unit flew British Spitfires before switching to P-51 Mustangs
  • Includes rare photos and color artwork

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  • FIGHTER A TO Z

    Volume 46, Issue 6, 1994, Air International

    Continuing the AIR International encyclopaedia of the world's fighter aircraft; from the Sukhoi Su-34 (Su-271B) to the Supermarine Spitfire V & VI

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    FIGHTER A TO Z

    Volume 47, Issue 1, 1994, Air International

    Continuing the AIR International encyclopaedia of the world's fighter aircraft, this month covering Supermarine Seafire and Spitfire variants

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    Flier Tuck!

    Number 80, March 1988, Flypast magazine

    Tribute to Bob Stanford Tuck - a man born to be a fighter pilot

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    Image of Birth of a Spitfire

    Birth of a Spitfire

    Clive Du Cros

    Ask any small boy today “What is a Spitfire?” and the likely response will be “It’s a fighter aircraft that flew in World War Two!” Even today, the evocative sight and sound of a Spitfire flying overhead with its distinctive elliptical shaped wings and the roar of its Rolls Royce Merlin engine, is still a reassuring sight as it was back then all those years ago when England was fighting for her very survival.
    As a small boy Clive Du Cros became fascinated with this legend as well and made it his childhood ambition to build and fly his very own Spitfire. The story within these pages is the fascinating account of not only one man’s determination to build and fly his very own Spitfire, but how he had to change his life in order to accommodate the building of it, with all the associated and humorous problems that only a project of this magnitude can be beset with!
    Birth of a Spitfire is a great tale of Clive fulfilling his lifelong dream and is a must read for anyone who enjoys a very interesting and funny book.

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    Image of Life as a Battle of Britain Pilot

    Life as a Battle of Britain Pilot

    Jonathan Falconer

    Southern England. Late summer 1940. The nation is fighting for its very survival and the Luftwaffe's aerial offensive is unrelenting. All that lies between invasion and salvation for Britain is the 'thin blue line' of RAF Fighter Command and its pilots. This newly illustrated anniversary edition of Life as a Battle of Britain Pilot reveals what it was like to fly a fighter plane in the Battle of Britain. Who were the Spitfire and Hurrican pilots of 1940? How did they spend a typical day? And when pitched together in combat at 30,000 feet, which was the better machine - Spitfire or Me109? Read Lilfe as a Battle of Britain Pilot and then ask yourself: would I have been up to the job?

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    Five to Nine: Evolving the Spitfire - A Detailed Examination of the Modifications

    Volume 95, September 2001, Air Enthusiast

    Wojtek Matusiak

    Supermarine's Type 361 - the Spitfire IX - was intended as a hasty stop-gap measure, pending delivery of the much-improved Type 360 (the Mk.VIII). The Mk.IX was essentially a Mk.Vc fitted with a more powerful Merlin 60-series engine - it required only the minimum number of changes to the internal systems to accept the engine. As it turned out, the Type 361 (later also manufactured as the Mk.XVI - virtually the same but fitted with a licence-built engine) was eventually built in larger numbers than any other Spitfire version.

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    Caught in the Middle: Air Combat Between Israel and the RAF

    Volume 115, January 2005, Air Enthusiast

    Bruce Williamson

    Since the end of World War Two, only six RAF aircraft flown by RAF pilots have been lost in air-to-air engagements. The most recent was on November 6, 1956, when a Syrian Gloster Meteor F.8 shot down an English Electric Canberra PR.7 over Syria, killing one of the crew. The other five aircraft were shot down by a Canadian and three Americans, flying as volunteers for the Israeli Air Force in British-built aircraft, during three confused and controversial encounters between former comrades-in-arms in the skies over Israel and the barren Sinai Desert.

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    Spitfire notebook -part 2

    Volume 18, Issue 06, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Continuing a popular series first published in the late Forties by The Aeroplane Spotter

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    Spitfire anatomy

    Volume 22, Issue 12, 1994, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    SJ Paine

    S Paine continues his mark-by-mark engineering history of the Spitfire.
    SJ Paine continues his mark-by-mark engineering history of the Supermarine Spitfire and Seafire, compiled in 1945-1946 after his close wartime involvement in producing the RAF manuals for the type. In Part Two he looks at the early PR variants, the first Seafires and the RAF fighter marks VI to IX

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    In Defence Of The Spitfire

    Volume 23, Issue 08, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Rod Smith

    Former Spitfire pilot Rod Smith takes issue with an eminent proponent of the Hurricane.
    Rod Smith, who served with distinction as a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War Two, takes issue with some of the remarks made by Roland Beamont in his feature Hurricane Testing, published in our Feburary 1994 issue

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    The Battle of Britain Flight

    Volume 6 Issue 01, 1973, Aircraft illustrated

    Tony Norman

    Of all the units in the RAF, one must stand out as having more than its fair shar of enthusiasm in relation to the number of aeroplanes it operates. THis is the Battle of Britain Flight. Manned by volunteers, its four Spitfires and two Hurricanes keep the insatiable appetites of eager spectators at air displays the length and breadth of Britain satisfied.

    The Battle of Britain Flight was formed at Biggin Hill in 1957...

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    Image of Spitfire: The Combat History

    Spitfire: The Combat History

    Robert Jackson

    No fighter aircraft in history has evoked such enthusiasm as the Supermarine Spitfire. Beloved by all who flew it, the Spitfire and its naval version, the Seafire, fought in every theatre of war. In fact, the Spitfire was the only Allied fighter aircraft to see continual front-line service from 1939 to 1945, and its combat career went beyond that. In the immediate postwar years, Spitfires saw action in Malaya, Indo-China and Israel, where they played a great part in assuring the infant Israeli Air Force's air supremacy over its Arab foes, while Seafires fought in Korea.

    In this superbly illustrated and intensely readable book, leading aviation historian Robert Jackson charts the Spitfire's combat career across the world, from its earliest skirmishes against the Luftwaffe over the North Sea to its final actions of WW2 against the Japanese in Burma, and also deals with operations by the Royal Navy's Seafires in European and Far Eastern waters.

    Through the eyes of its...

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    Military personal album

    Volume 21, Issue 02, 1993, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    John Stroud

    These photographs of wartime and post war RAF aircraft coms from CW Rogers of Saffron Waldon
     
    de Havilland Tigermoth T6234, K4271
    Airspeed Oxford AS680
    Dakota III FZ587
    Hurricane KZ719, K1605, LD864
    Spitfire BL973 or BL975?
     
     

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    Military Personal Album

    Volume 23, Issue 06, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Ivor R Stott

    Photographs taken at Chakeri in India during 1946-47
     
    This selection of photographs was submitted by IVOR R. STOTT of Wimborne, Dorset, who was stationed at Chakeri in India for a year from September 1946. At the time, this aerodrome was home to 322 MU, 101 Air Stores park, and the Royal Indian Air Forces No 6 Sqn
     
    Lancastrian VM 735
    Spitfire VIIIs MD274, JG263
    Mosquito PR.XVI NS688
    Class CA Locomotive
    Fairchild Argus HB674, HB552

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    Photo Feature: D-Day striped spit

    Volume 5 Issue 11, 1972, Aircraft illustrated

    A SUPERBLY restored example of the Spitfire IX-the RAFs answer to the Focke-Wulf 190 -regularly gracing the British aeronautical scene in the skilled hands of ex-Red Arrows leader Sqn Ldr Ray Hanna is G-ASJV / MH434,
    now repainted with invasion stripes and the initials of its owner,Mr Adrian Squires...

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    Spitfires over Darwin

    Volume 5 Issue 10, 1972, Aircraft illustrated

    No 1 (Fighter) Wing. RAAF. formed up at Richmond. New South Wales, in January 19 43. and after receiving its Spitfire Mk VCs (shipped to Australia under the psuedonym Capstans), proceeded via Inland staging points to Darwin in the Northern Territory to provide the main fighter defence against raids from Japanese - held islands to the north of Australia

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    Image of Ultimate Spitfires

    ULTIMATE SPITFIRES

    Peter Caygill

    The Spitfire is probably Britain's best loved and admired airplane. It is also revered around the world. This book looks at the later marques that were modified for various special tasks and differed to a large degree from Supermarine's first early versions that saw action in the early days of World War II. New and more powerful Rolls-Royce engines replaced the well-tried Merlin, but increased the aircrafts performance in terms of speed and operational altitude. Subtle changes to wing design also increased the maneuverability and capability of these spectacular models that survived in the operational role until superseded by the introduction of jet-powered flight.

    The content explains the design details, development and flight testing of twelve models and also contains their operational roles and history. Lengthy appendices will include Griffon-powered Spitfire aces, V1 rocket destruction aces, Griffon-powered Spitfire losses and where the survivors can be found

    The Spitfire is probably Britain's best loved and admired aeroplane. It is also revered around the world. This book looks at the later marques that were modified for various special tasks and differed to a large degree from Supermarine's first early versions that saw action in the early days of World War II. New and more powerful Rolls-Royce engines replaced the well-tried Merlin, but increased the aircrafts performance in terms of speed and operational altitude. Subtle changes to wing design also increased the manoeuvrability and capability of these spectacular models that survived in the operational role until superseded by the introduction of jet-powered flight. The content explains the design details, development and flight testing of twelve models and also contains their operational roles and history. Lengthy appendices will include Griffon-powered Spitfire aces, V1 rocket destruction aces, Griffon-powered Spitfire losses and where the survivors can be found.

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    No. 39 - Supermarine Spitfire in Action

    Aircraft in Action Jerry Scutts

    At the time of Its inception there was nothing to match the Supermarine Spitfire for sheer grace of line and, while one might argue its claim to be the most esthetically appeal. Mg single seat fighter to emerge from the Second World War, there are surely few contenders for the title. With a combat record second to none, the Spitfire exemplified the part played by the RAF to gain final victory in that conflict, and to the British nation was far more than just another airplane that had helped to win the war. People saw It as the single weapon that had preserved a way of life at a time when everything they held dear was in the greatest danger of being forcibly changed forever. it mattered little to the man in the street that the Spitfire's part in the Battle of Britain was numerically less than that of the Hurricane, for it was the Supermarine fighter that caught the public imagination In a way that was probably unique. Certainly few fighter aircraft were more aptly named; in squadron...

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    No. 39 - Supermarine Spitfire in Action

    Aircraft in Action Jerry Scutts

    At the time of Its inception there was nothing to match the Supermarine Spitfire for sheer grace of line and, while one might argue its claim to be the most esthetically appeal. Mg single seat fighter to emerge from the Second World War, there are surely few contenders for the title. With a combat record second to none, the Spitfire exemplified the part played by the RAF to gain final victory in that conflict, and to the British nation was far more than just another airplane that had helped to win the war. People saw It as the single weapon that had preserved a way of life at a time when everything they held dear was in the greatest danger of being forcibly changed forever. it mattered little to the man in the street that the Spitfire's part in the Battle of Britain was numerically less than that of the Hurricane, for it was the Supermarine fighter that caught the public imagination In a way that was probably unique. Certainly few fighter aircraft were more aptly named; in squadron...

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    Image of Spitfire - A Test Pilot's Story (Crecy Soft Cover Range)

    Spitfire - A Test Pilot's Story

    Jeffrey Quill

    An exceptional test pilot, Jeffrey Quill took charge of some of the most important military aircraft of his time and, in particular, the immortal Spitfire from its experimental, prototype stage in 1936 to the end of its production in 1948. He used his first-hand experience of combat conditions fighting with 65 Squadron at the height of the Battle of Britain to help turn this elegant flying machine into a deadly fighter airplane.

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    Spitfire Salute

    Volume 23, Issue 12, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Alex Henshaw , Jeffrey Quill , Richard Riding

    Richard Riding reports on a recent event held at RAF Coningsby in honour of Spitfire test pilots Jeffrey Quill and Alex Henshaw

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    Spitfire: A Test Pilot's Defence

    Volume 23, Issue 09, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Alex Henshaw , Jeffrey Quill

    Alex Henshaw, with Jeffrey Quill, defends the reputation of the Spitfire in comparison with the Hurricane

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    Test pilot profile No 7-Part 2

    Volume 11, Issue 08, 1983, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Don Middleton , Jeffrey Quill

    Don Middleton, yet again, concludes his two-part biography of Jeffrey Quill-the man who tested every variant of the Spitfire from the prototype to the Seafire 47

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    Test Pilot Profile No. 7- Jeffrey K. Quill

    Volume 11, Issue 07, 1983, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Don Middleton , Jeffrey Quill

    Don Middleton begins a two-part biography of the man who test flew every Mark of the Spitfire, from the prototype to the Seafire Mk 47

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    Start of it All

    Number 56, March 1986, Flypast magazine

    Jeffrey Quill

    This month sees the 50th Anniversary of the first flight of the Spitfire, Jeffrey Quill recounts the day.

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    Timeteam Spitfire Dig

    Number 223, February 2000, Flypast magazine

    Guy de la Bedoyere

    Channel 4's Timeteam programme helped to recover a Battle Of France Spitfire. Guy de la Bedoyere was part of the Dig Crew

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    Fateful Mission

    Number 227, June 2000, Flypast magazine

    John Lewery

    John Lewery recounts the solitary world of a PRU Spitfire Pilot - Unarmed and in Harm's Way

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    Lost & Found

    Number 224, March 2000, Flypast magazine

    Eddie Leaf

    Hot-Foot on the report of a 'Dig' on a Spitfire in France in the February issue, Eddie Leaf presents the story of the rediscovery of a Spitfire in Germany

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    Drawing The Aces Of Spades

    Number 246, January 2002, Flypast magazine

    Alan Peart

    Alan Peart remembers his days with 81 Squadron facing the might of the Luftwaffe's JG53 in Algeria

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    Image of Test Pilot

    Test Pilot

    Neville Duke , Neville Duke (DSO OBE DFC

    Neville Duke is well known in aviation circles, not only as a successful fighter pilot, but also as a test pilot with the Hawker Aviation Company.

    Joining the RAF at the start of the war, he found himself in 1941 with 92 Squadron at RAF Biggin Hill. That spring and summer he survived the air battles over Northern France with the Biggin Hill Wing, often flying as wing man to the famous and legendary 'Sailor' Malan - Fighter Command's top-scoring pilot at that time.

    Towards the end of the war he became an RAF test pilot and later a member of the RAF's High Speed Flight. This was the start of a successful career as a test pilot after leaving the Service in 1948, having been awarded the AFC. Working for Hawkers, he became Chief Test Pilot and did all the major flight development on one of the most famous of all RAF peacetime aircraft - the Hawker Hunter, and with it took the world speed record in 1953. 2003 marks the 50th anniversary of this record

    Neville later set up his own test flying business, as well as becoming the personal pilot of Sir George Dowty. He worked for years as a freelance and highly respected test pilot, working on the Optica, Fieldmaster and Firemaster airplanes. He still flies his own plane.?

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    The single-seater game

    Volume 4 Issue 11, 1971, Aircraft illustrated

    Gordon Bowtle

    "I First saw a Spitfire in flight in September 1938 when my father took me to Martlesham Heath to look at the latest aircraft to enter RAF service; like so many other lads of my age, I resolved to become a Spitfire pilot as soon as I was old enought. Hard work and good luck with school exams, good health despite a bout of rheumatic fever, the native ability to talk my ray through four seperate selection boards of increasing severity, a sidestep around conscription for the coal mines, and I was safely enlisted in the RAFVR as an ACH/ut pilot..."

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    The single-seater game

    Volume 4 Issue 11, 1971, Aircraft illustrated

    Gordon Bowtle

    "I First saw a Spitfire in flight in September 1938 when my father took me to Martlesham Heath to look at the latest aircraft to enter RAF service; like so many other lads of my age, I resolved to become a Spitfire pilot as soon as I was old enought. Hard work and good luck with school exams, good health despite a bout of rheumatic fever, the native ability to talk my ray through four seperate selection boards of increasing severity, a sidestep around conscription for the coal mines, and I was safely enlisted in the RAFVR as an ACH/ut pilot..."

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    Man & Machine - Roland Fraissinet

    Number 90, January 1989, Flypast magazine

    Roland Fraissinet

    FlyPast travelled to the south of France to talk to Roland Fraissinet and to see his magnificent Mystere IVA put through its paces

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    Duel in the Desert

    Volume 7 Issue 8, 2006, Combat Aircraft Magazine

    Collins JD , James P Busha , JD Collinsworth

    The US Army Air Force was glad to get its hands on the Supermarine Spitfire, and in AAF service the type served with great distinction, not least in North Africa. Col J. D. 'Jerry' Collinsworth, USAF (Ret'd) tells James P. Busha about his experiences of the 'Spit'The US Army Air Force was glad to get its hands on the Supermarine Spitfire, and in AAF service the type served with great distinction, not least in North Africa. Col J. D. 'Jerry' Collinsworth, USAF (Ret'd) tells James P. Busha about his experiences of the 'Spit

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    Spitfires on the wing (UK)

    Number 176, March 1996, Flypast magazine

    Robert Rudhall

    The Spitfire first took to the air 60 years ago this month, Robert Rudhall looks at the examples of R J Mitchell's creation which will be flying in the UK during this anniversary year

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    Of Bombs and Pictures

    Number 179, June 1996, Flypast magazine

    Eddie Leaf

    Eddie Leaf looks at the work that 3 PRU performed on behalf of RAF Bomber Command

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    RAF in Luftwaffe colours

    Number 179, June 1996, Flypast magazine

    Cynrik De Decker , Jean-Louis Roba

    Throughout World War Two, RAF aircraft fell into German hands - and were put to good use nu their new 'owners'; Jean-Louis Roba and Cynrik De Decker investigate this little known part of the air power story

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    Finding the 'Stars'

    Number 98, September 1989, Flypast magazine

    Robert Rudhall

    Having decided on making 'The Battle of Britain', the producers needed someone to assemble a massive 'air force' They turned to Hamish Mahaddie. Robert Rudhall describes the tasked that faced him

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    Battle Of Britain

    Number 98, September 1989, Flypast magazine

    Francois Prins

    Filming the epic and gathering of the 'stars'.

    Twenty years ago the epic film Battle of Britain was premiered. Francois Prins starts a two part feature on the making of an exceptional movie

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    Contasts at Coltishall

    Volume 4 Issue 09, 1971, Aircraft illustrated

    Peter R March

    "ROYAL Air Force Station Coltishall is situated on a windy hill top a few miles north of Norwich, a town with which it has had a long association. "Aggressive in Defence" is the station's motto, which aptly describes both its history and its present day role as a training unit under Strike Command Headquarters..."

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    Memories of the Twelfth

    Volume 4 Issue 09, 1971, Aircraft illustrated

    In the month which will always be associated with the Spitfire's greatest moments, T.F.N. spotlights one of the least known of the famous breed in some "Memories of the Twelfth"

    OF the dozen or so Spitfire variants which saw service during the Second World War, the Mark XII was, and remains, one of the least known. Only two squadrons used it, 41 and 91, and, although in operational service for more than a year, the aircraft never achieved any spectacular success. An interim type, produced to accommodate the first of the production Rolls-Royce Griffon engines and designed to meet a fast, medium altitude threat, it was basically a converted Mark VC. There were some obvious changes, such as a bigger airscrew and spinner, an enlarged tail assemb ly, and a few new lumps and bumps. There were also a number of modifications not quite so obvious.

    So little was known about the aircraft that, when in early February, 1943, I received a two-line signal with the information that...

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    Image of The Spitfire Story DVD and Book Pack (Story series)

    The Spitfire Story DVD and Book Pack (Story series)

    Story series Peter R March

    Arguably the most famous fighter of all time, The Spitfire Story continues the history of this iconic aircraft. From the end of the war to its final operational RAF sortie in 1954, the Spitfire was continually developed. A celebration of R.J.Mitchell's unique contribution to aviation history, The Spitfire Story contains a complete listing of preservation projects including, the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight. Appendecies include technical specifications, significant milestones and a list of all airworthy airframes. The DVD contains dramitic wartime film and colour footage of surviving Spitfires in flight. This is the definitive documentary of a thoroughbred fighter.

    1/04/2011

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    Image of SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE IX 1942-1943 VOL 1: Polish Wings No 13

    SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE IX 1942-1943 VOL 1: Polish Wings No 13

    Wojtek Matusiak

    The book describes Spitfire IXs used by Polish pilots in Britain during 1942-1943, both in Polish squadrons and in RAF and auxiliary units. It includes listings of losses and of officially credited victories. There are over 200 photographs (about half of which have not been published before) and 36 color profiles (plus top and bottom views for two representative aircraft).

    REVIEWS

    "...absolutely superb!... huge selection of archival photos...highly recommended.Air Modeler, 08/2011"...essential reading for students of the Spitfire and WWII air warfare, enthusiasts and modelers. Highly recommended."

    5/11/2011

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    Image of New Heavens: My Life as a Fighter Pilot and a Founder of the Israel Air Force (Aviation Classics)

    New Heavens: My Life as a Fighter Pilot and a Founder of the Israel Air Force (Aviation Classics)

    Boris Senior

    Although Boris Senior may not be well known outside Israel, he played an important, even vital, part in the formation of the Israel Air Force (IAF) and in the 1948 War of Independence. Those who are familiar with his efforts and dedication have an abiding respect and appreciation for this transplanted South African who nearly died when shot down on a mission in 1945 for the Royal Air Force.

    Leaving the RAF after World War II, Senior dedicated himself to the formation of the state of Israel by joining the Irgun to fight British control of Palestine. Originally undertaking surreptitious operations to undermine the governing authority in Palestine, the onset of the 1948 War of Independence had him back in combat, this time against Israel’s Arab neighbors. He flew combat sorties in such widely differing aircraft as the Spitfire and, of all things, a Beechcraft Bonanza, a general-aviation type. Senior used his own money to buy supplies and aircraft, personally under-taking multiple dangerous missions to fly new acquisitions to Israel. His tireless work to form an air defense system for the newly formed State of Israel laid the groundwork for the modern-day Israel Air Force.

    Through all his experiences, Senior has maintained an abiding understanding of the overall situation that still bedevils the Middle East, particularly Israel and its neighbors. Now, as a senior citizen, his fondest wish is to see the resolution of the age-old problems that result in so many Israelis and Arabs dying in attacks and counterattacks, more than fifty years after he helped launch the IAF.

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    Image of pilot's notes for Spitfire IX, XI, & XVI

    pilot's notes for Spitfire IX, XI, & XVI

    Pilots notes/Flight operating instructions Air Ministry

    A series of books that provide, for the first time, the detailed information every pilot needs to know about the aircraft they are flying. Each book in the series covers all aspects of a popular aircraft type and is illustrated throughout with photographs and diagrams.

    1/04/2004

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    Image of Fighter Pilot's Summer: Sequal to the Best-Selling Fighter Pilot

    FIGHTER PILOT'S SUMMER: Sequal to the Best-Selling Fighter Pilot

    Norman Franks , Paul Richey , Paul Richey (Wg Cmdr)

    Unknown to almost everyone Paul Richey started this sequel to his acclaimed book Fighter Pilot in 1941, but was unable to continue it beyond the initial chapters. Now, aviation author and historian Norman Franks, by gaining exclusive access to Paul’s papers and diaries, has completed the work.

    Richey, despite being seriously wounded in the Battle of Britain, returned to fly a tour of operations from RAF Biggin Hill in 1941 as a flight commander in 609 (West Riding) Squadron, RAuxAF, and gain a bar to the DFC he won in France. Fighter Pilot’s Summer is the story not only of 609 Squadron’s offensive war during that momentous summer, but also of Paul’s exploits to the end of the war at Fighter Command HQ and then in India and Burma

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    Spitfires Galore

    Number 204, July 1998, Flypast magazine

    Robert Rudhall

    Report on the great spitfire gathering at Duxford; Plus fold out drawing, cutaway, colour side views and a list of airworthy survivors!

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    Image of Photo Reconnaissance Spitfires (On Target Profiles)

    Photo Reconnaissance Spitfires in Worldwide Service

    On Target Profiles Jon Freeman

    If the Spitfire wasn't interesting enough already, just take a look at its many variants and guises when utilised in the photo-reconnaissance role. From the very earliest days of its military career the RAF realised its potential as a fast and capable PR platform and for that reason almost every mark of Spitfire thereafter had a photo-reconnaissance or fighter-reconnaissance variant.

    This publication reviews the aircraft in service not only in the UK but also in America, Belgium, Denmark, India, Italy, Norway, Sweden, Thailand and Turkey.

    No modeller's collection should be without a Spitfire and the examples included in this book are more interesting than most. If it's inspiration that you're after, look no further!

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    Supermarine Seafire: Mk.Ib-Mk.47

    On Target Profiles Jon Freeman

    ollowing the relatively successful adaption of the RAF's Hurricane for the Fleet Air Arm the Admiralty next turned its attentions to the Spitfire. However, despite valiant attempts at localised strengthening of the airframe for the harsh treatment of landing on a pitching carrier the aircraft failed to develop in to a natural carrier-borne fighter. Its relatively narrow track undercarriage and tendency to suffer prop strikes on landing meant that until the Griffon engine was introduced on the Mk.XVII the renamed Seafire often caused more problems than it solved!

    Despite its troubled beginnings the Seafire eventually became "world class" in its final variant, the FR Mk.47. We hope that this book provides a fitting tribute to this very unique aeroplane.

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    Image of On-target Profile No 4: Spitfires Mk 1-6 in the European Theatre of Operations: No. 4

    Spitfires Mk 1-6 in the European Theatre of Operations

    On Target Profiles Jon Freeman

    This is one aeroplane that needs no introduction. The Spitfire is certainly one of the most famous fighters in history. This book tracks the progress of the aircraft in the European theatre from its earliest days as the Mk.I through to the introduction of the Mk.VI.

    This publication should serve as a worthy complement to your existing Spitfire reference. Compiled with reference to contemporary photographs and information from a variety of sources, this should provide plenty of inspiration to any modeller looking to construct an airframe from this period.

    The Spitfire continues to be a popular subject for many a modeller and the Aviation Workshop is proud to offer numerous resin accessories, conversions and decals to compliment this book.

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    Image of Spitfire (Motorbooks International Warbird History)

    Spitfire

    Jeffrey L Ethell

    Book by Ethell, Jeffery L., Pace, Steve

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    Kiwi twins - the Gray brothers

    Volume 3 Issue 10, 1970, Aircraft illustrated

    Chaz Bowyer

    ON November 9, 1914, in the little town of Papanui,near Christchurch. New Zealand , twin boys were born. Although a not uncommon occurrence, these particular twins were, each in his own way, to earn great distinction during the 1939/1945 war in the air. Kenneth Neil Gray, during an operational career spanning a mere nine months, gained one of the first Distinguished Flying Crosses awarded to a New Zealander and a Czech War Cross ; while his brother Colin Falkland Gray flew three tours of fighter operations extending from Dunkirk through the North African campaigns and ending on VE Day In Europe. During those five years he became the highest scoring and most decorated 'Kiwi' pilot of the Second World War, being awarded two DSOs and three DFCs

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    Biggin Hill

    Volume 39, Issue 09, 1977, Air Pictorial

    Peter G. Cooksley

    Farewell to a tradition?
    "THE CROWDS who poured from the gates at the famous Battle of Britain fighter  station at the end of last year's RAF, "At Home" Day were unmindful that in all probability they were the last of the millions of visitors who have attended the annual event for more than two decades. Although the focus of the RA.F.'s displays in Jubilee Year has been concentrated at Finningley, the unlikelihood of a return of the capital 's displays makes the field in Kent another
    victim of inflation and Defence costs pared below suicide level.
    The beginning of this tradition for Londoners was laid shortly after the Armistice of 1918 when the first Hendon Air Pageant was held to counter despair within the RAF. and restore flagging morale brought about by the financial cuts introduced by the Government of the day. Thereafter held each year, until war broke out, these displays were augmented later by the yearly Empire Air Days mounted by the (then) Air League of...

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    Edinburgh's Own

    Volume 39, Issue 08, 1977, Air Pictorial

    Ian G Stott

    A history of No. 603 Squadron, R.Aux.A.F.
     
    TWENTY YEARS ago, because of the prohibitive cost-it was said-of providing and maintaining new-generation interceptor aircraft as replacements for the obsolescent types then being operated. the decision was taken, almost arbitrarily,  to disband all twenty fighter squadrons of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force.
    From Aberdeen to Bristol, and from Belfast to the Home Counties, this most profeSsional and dedicated band of "weekend warriors" stood by in sad  disbelief as their Meteors and Vampires were ferried away to be  unceremoniously reduced to scrap.
    Virtually overnight an irreplaceable reserve of highly experienced combat pilots who had volunteered their services to fly in the defence of their country with such skill and determination , were cast aside to become an almost forgotten breed.
    The history that follows, which typifies the role and the spirit of the R.Aux.A.F., is in tribute to all those who served...

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    From Spitfire to Swift - Part 1

    Volume 52, Issue 5, 1997, Air International

    James Goulding

    In the first of a two-part series tracing the linear development of the two fighters, James Goulding looks at the piston-engine era.

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    Image of SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE I/II: Polish Wings No 6

    SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE I/II: Polish Wings No 6

    Wojtek Matusiak

    The book is about Polish pilots, flying Spitfires (Mk. I and II) for the RAF. The Polish Air Force tried, unsuccessfully, to buy Spitfires in 1939. A great many Polish pilots, in exile, subsequently flew Spitfires for the RAF, from 1940 until 1943.The book is illustrated with 169 black and white wartime photos, with an additional five color shots of Spitfires in museums. There are 33 full color profile paintings showing the camouflage and markings of Spitfires flown by Polish pilots.These profiles are partially superimposed over photos of the actual aircraft being illustrated. This is a new way of doing profiles in a book, for me. Usually profiles are on pages by themselves. However, it does not distract that much. Added to the mix are illustrations of five wartime documents. Author Wojtek Matusiak is one of the foremost Spitfire historians of the day, and has published extensively in both Polish and English. This impeccably researched book will be of interest to aviation historians, enthusiasts, and model builders

    REVIEWS

    "... profusely illustrated ... This impeccably researched book will be of interest to aviation historians, enthusiasts and model builders." Cybermodeler

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    Image of Spitfire Dive-Bombers Versus the V2: Fighter Command's Battle with Hitler's Mobile Missiles

    SPITFIRE DIVE-BOMBERS VS THE V2: Fighter Command's Battle with Hitler's Mobile Missiles

    Bill Simpson

    Air Marshal Roderic Hill countered the V2 threat by using six squadrons of Spitfires from 12 Group bases in Norfolk to discover and then dive-bomb the mobile V2 launch sites which were scattered throughout the Dutch towns and countryside. This was no easy task as the missiles were well camouflaged and often positioned adjacent to dwellings occupied by civilians.

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    Image of 'The Greatest Squadron of Them All': The Definitive History of 603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron, Raauxaf : 1941-To Date

    'The Greatest Squadron of Them All': The Definitive History of 603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron, Raauxaf : 1941-To Date

    Bill Simpson , Bruce Blanche , David Ross

    Formed as a light bomber unit of the Auxiliary Air Force in October 1925, it was at the height of the Battle of Britain the Commanding Officer of RAF Hornchurch, Group Captain "Boy" Bouchier described 603 as "perhaps the greatest squadron of them all". The Squadron has enjoyed prestigious and distinguished service second to none. Volume two of this extensive history details the 603 story through 1941 and on to the squadron's part in the siege of Malta, through the anti-shipping strikes by the Beaufighters of the unit to its return to England for re-equipping with Spitfires for operations in support of bombers and against V2 launch sites. After the war, 603 Squadron was returned to auxiliary status, re-equipped again with Spitfires and then Vampire jets prior to disbandment in 1957. Re-formed in 1999, the story ends with the Squadron's duties in the modern-day air force.

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    Image of The Greatest Squadron of Them All (Volume One): The Definitive History of 603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron, Rauxaf in Two Volumes

    The Greatest Squadron of Them All': The Definitive History of 603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron, Raauxaf : Formation to the End of 1940

    Bill Simpson , Bruce Blanche , David Ross

    Formed as a light bomber unit of the Auxiliary Air Force in October 1925, it was at the height of the Battle of Britain the Commanding Officer of RAF Hornchurch, Group Captain "Boy" Bouchier described 603 as "perhaps the greatest squadron of them all". The Squadron has enjoyed prestigious and distinguished service second to none. This extensive history details the 603 story through the early years with its colourful characters, through the Phoney War and into the Battle of Britain. Here, pen portraits and narrative tell of acts of bravery, heroism and loyalty to the cause by pilots and ground crew alike. It was a tight-knit squadron and the loss of personnel was felt deeply. The authors have included an extensive collection of documents and photographs in the text.

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    FIGHTER A TO Z

    Volume 47, Issue 2, 1994, Air International

    Continuing the AIR International encyclopaedia of the
    world's fighter air craft , this month covering Supermarine Spitfire floatplane to the Mk 24 variants.

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    Spitfire Milestones

    Number 201, April 1998, Flypast magazine

    Dr Alfred Price

    In part two of this feature, Dr Alfred Price continues his look at signifigant Spitfire events

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    Coffins for Boffins

    Number 199, February 1998, Flypast magazine

    Adrian Bishop

    Adrian Bishop recalls his time as a Flight Test observer (FTO) with the Royal Aircraft Establishment in the first part of this three-part series

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    The Special Survey Flight

    Number 199, February 1998, Flypast magazine

    Eddie Leaf

    Eddie Leaf looks at the two-month career of this very special, and very secret unit

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    Behind the Canvas

    Number 121, August 1991, Flypast magazine

    Concluding the work of the Shoreham Aircraft Preservation Society with a highlight on their 'forgotten' Spitfire

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    Type report

    Number 117, April 1991, Flypast magazine

    Duncan Cubitt , Patrick Watts

    Patrick Watts explains the past of the Spitfire Mk IX MJ730 and Duncan Cubitt captures her in the air

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    Fifty years of Stardom

    Number 144, July 1993, Flypast magazine

    Spitfire MH434 is 50 years old - join us at the celebrations!

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    Image of Air War on the Edge: A History of the Israel Air Force and It's Aircraft Since 1947

    Air War on the Edge: A History of the Israel Air Force and It's Aircraft Since 1947

    Bill Norton

    Never before has there been a book published on the aircraft, units and exploits of the Israel Air Force in such depth. Interest in the IAF has always been high and seldom are its aircrew and aircraft out of the world's headlines. Previous books have failed to satisfy, either being sensationalist and low on factual content, or lacking in fundamental research. Bill Norton has trawled through thousands of documents, reports, and illustrations to produce a work that is staggering in its depth and knowledge. Those that think they know the IAF will find a wealth of new material and countless previously published 'facts' re-evaluated and righted. Detailed type-by-type coverage supported by a barrage of photographs of the IAF from the mixed bag of aircraft of its formative days, through the Suez Campaign, the Six Day War, Yom Kippur and on to be a sophisticated, well-equipped force, arguably the most experienced in the world. Included for the first time are all of the badges and heraldry of the units of the IAF, in full color.

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    Image of Darwin Spitfires: The Real Battle for Australia

    Darwin Spitfires: The Real Battle for Australia

    Anthony Cooper

    Using war diaries, combat reports, and other official correspondence and records, this fast-paced narrative reconstructs in detail the prolonged air battle in defense of Darwin, Australia: the only sustained and intensive direct assault on the continent during the entirety of World War II. In 1943, a small band of inexperienced Australian and British fighter pilots fought against a formidably skilled and proficient Japanese opponent, and this account of the little-known campaigns in northwestern Australia discusses the 10 major conflicts that took place, plugging a huge gap in the literature of Australian military history. Because many Australians are unfamiliar with these attacks to the mainland territory, this enlightening account recovers an important aspect of this nation’s history.

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    REVERSE ENGINEERING

    Number 225, April 2000, Flypast magazine

    Ken Ellis

    Medway Aircraft Preservation Society is taking a Spitfire back in time. Ken Ellis reports on a fascinating restoration

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    Luftwaffe Mayhem: Operation Bodenplatte

    Number 162, January 1995, Flypast magazine

    Duncan Cree , Ernest Watson

    New Years Day, 1945, saw the Luftwaffe make a last ditch attempt for air superiority with a massive attack on the RAF's continental airfields. Thankfully it did not quite go according to plan!

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    Image of Great Book of World War II Airplanes

    Great Book of World War II Airplanes

    Jeffrey L Ethell

    A remarkable overview of World War II aviation encompasses more than four hundred full-color photographs and illustrations, twenty-four foldout panels, detailed cutaway views, and authoritative profiles of twelve aircraft that changed the course of the war.

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    SPITFIRE FROM THE SEA

    Number 239, June 2001, Flypast magazine

    Peter R Arnold

    Peter R Arnold uncovers the past of the world's
    'latest' Spitfire, a Desert Air Force veteran

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    Thum Reunion

    Number 73, August 1987, Flypast magazine

    Crews of Woodvale's Thum Flight reassemble to recreate their Spitfire past

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    No.72 Vickers Supermarine Merlin Seafire

    Warpaint Books Kevin Darling

    "In 1941 the Fleet Air Arm was equipped with the Hawker Sea Hurricane and the Fairey Fulmar. While both would give a good account of themselves it was obvious that at some point their opposition would outstrip them in agility and speed. The answer was to navalise the Supermarine Spitfire as an interim before lend lease aircraft became available in quantity from America. Starting with the hooked Spitfire conversions of the Mk V the FAA would eventually receive the fixed wing Mk 1b, various versions of the Mk II and the very capable Mk III. The Mk 1b would quickly be replaced by the folding wing versions which made the type far more flexible, thus all the fleet and escort carriers were able to carry a complement of the speedy fighter. The Seafire did have some faults, the first was a lack of endurance which was cured by adding external fuel tanks, while the tendency to ping the deck on touch down was cured by better training and the ability to trim the blades should such an event...

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    No.72 Vickers Supermarine Merlin Seafire

    Warpaint Books Kevin Darling

    "In 1941 the Fleet Air Arm was equipped with the Hawker Sea Hurricane and the Fairey Fulmar. While both would give a good account of themselves it was obvious that at some point their opposition would outstrip them in agility and speed. The answer was to navalise the Supermarine Spitfire as an interim before lend lease aircraft became available in quantity from America. Starting with the hooked Spitfire conversions of the Mk V the FAA would eventually receive the fixed wing Mk 1b, various versions of the Mk II and the very capable Mk III. The Mk 1b would quickly be replaced by the folding wing versions which made the type far more flexible, thus all the fleet and escort carriers were able to carry a complement of the speedy fighter. The Seafire did have some faults, the first was a lack of endurance which was cured by adding external fuel tanks, while the tendency to ping the deck on touch down was cured by better training and the ability to trim the blades should such an event...

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    No.72 Vickers Supermarine Merlin Seafire

    Warpaint Books Kevin Darling

    "In 1941 the Fleet Air Arm was equipped with the Hawker Sea Hurricane and the Fairey Fulmar. While both would give a good account of themselves it was obvious that at some point their opposition would outstrip them in agility and speed. The answer was to navalise the Supermarine Spitfire as an interim before lend lease aircraft became available in quantity from America. Starting with the hooked Spitfire conversions of the Mk V the FAA would eventually receive the fixed wing Mk 1b, various versions of the Mk II and the very capable Mk III. The Mk 1b would quickly be replaced by the folding wing versions which made the type far more flexible, thus all the fleet and escort carriers were able to carry a complement of the speedy fighter. The Seafire did have some faults, the first was a lack of endurance which was cured by adding external fuel tanks, while the tendency to ping the deck on touch down was cured by better training and the ability to trim the blades should such an event...

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    Spitfire: Simply superb - part two

    Volume 28, Issue 3, 1985, Air International

    The "Warbirds" article, commenced in our previous issue, continues with an account of the development and operational use of the Mks V, VI, VII, VIII and IX. A cutaway of the Spitfire IX is included

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    Curtain up

    Number 104, March 1990, Flypast magazine

    Battle of Britain Memorial Flight at Coningsby are hard at work preparing their fleet for the 50th Anniversary celebrations this summer. We popped into see them
    get ready for Curtain Up

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    Spitfires on Guard

    Number 189, April 1997, Flypast magazine

    Jim Simpson , Robert Rudhall

    In Part one of a two-part feature, Jim Simpson and Robert Rudhall take a pictorial look at some of the Supermarine Spitfires which have, in the past, 'stood guard' at various locations in the UK. Spitfires on guard continues in the May issue of Flypast

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    Spitfire: Simply Superb

    Volume 28, Issue 2, 1985, Air International

    The story of the Supermarine Spitfire — built in greater quantity than any other British aeroplane and surely one of the world's ten best-known and most effective warplanes — is told in a multi-instalment "Warbird" feature starting this month.

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    Year Of The Spitfire

    Number 63, October 1986, Flypast magazine

    The World's surviving Spitfires in a special color feature

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    Year Of The Spitfire

    Number 59, June 1986, Flypast magazine

    Two contrasting stories, flying Spitfires the day the war ended, and the story of a Circus mission.

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    The Aces

    Number 65, December 1986, Flypast magazine

    Part II & conclusion of our survey of Spitfire Aces

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    Sign here, Please!

    Number 251, June 2002, Flypast magazine

    The 'Air Mail Spitfire with probably the mose bizarre finish ever by an operational fighter

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    THE PEOPLES SPITFIRE

    Number 233, December 2000, Flypast magazine

    Carolyn Grace in conversation with the Editor about ML407's busy 2000 'season'

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    Spitfire Sortie, Air to Air

    Number 231, October 2000, Flypast magazine

    North Wales is home base for a little known collection of warbirds - including a two-seater Spitfire

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    The Last Spitfire

    Number 45, April 1985, Flypast magazine

    Peter Cooksley

    The Mk.24 was the final development of the Spitfire to carry that immortal name, Peter Cooksley looks at the type.

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    Burmese Lions: British Fighter Exports to Burma

    Volume 71, September 1997, Air Enthusiast

    Ken Ellis , Peter R Arnold

    The first fighter types used by the Union of Burma Air Forc~ were.of British origin. ranging from Seafires to Sea Furies. (Peter R Arnold and Ken Ellis )

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    Spitfire Reunion

    Number 33, April 1984, Flypast magazine

    The remarkable story of how an RAF pilot was reunited with the Mk VIII Spitfire he last flew in 1945.

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    From Israel to Burma: Operation Orez, Supplying and Ferrying Spitfires Part One

    Volume 78, November 1998, Air Enthusiast

    Peter R Amold , Shlomo Aloni

    After use with the Defence Force, Israel found an
    export customer for her Spitfires - Burma. (Shlomo
    Aloni and Peter R Amold)

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    Personal Album

    Volume 5, Issue 06, 1977, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    This months contributor is Mr N Sweeting of Doncaster, who took the pictures on these pages at RAF Seletar, Singapore, shortly after the Japanese surrender in 1945. Most of the subjects are Japanese Army and Navy types, although two RAF aircraft are also included

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    Spitfire or Messerschmitt?

    Number 301, August 2006, Flypast magazine

    Nicholas Wright

    Bf 109 'ace' Hans-Ekkehard Bob's view of the debate. Nicholas Wright talked to him about his exploits.

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    Griffon's Growl

    Number 301, August 2006, Flypast magazine

    Andew Thomas

    Andrew Thomas describes the Griffon-Spitfire's first major success over the Luftwaffe.

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    A most unusual Caterpillar

    Number 302, September 2006, Flypast magazine

    Tom Hughes

    Tom Hughes was a Spitfire pilot with 72 Squadron. Erik Mannings describes how he became a member of a very exclusive club.

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    Fighting Frenchmen

    Number 303, October 2006, Flypast magazine

    The story of one of the exiled French Spitfire squadrons that fought alongside the RAF.

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    Love at First Flight

    Number 304, November 2006, Flypast magazine

    More Spitfire memories from pilots of different eras and from a lady who built 'em!

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    UK Spitfires - 25 Years of Change

    Number 305, December 2006, Flypast magazine

    Todd Garvey

    Concluding our special surveys of the UK Spitfire population, Todd Garvey presents a snapshot of a very different era.

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    Coningsby's 'Baby'

    Number 305, December 2006, Flypast magazine

    A pictorial history of the many faces of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight's Mk.II, known as 'P7', or even the 'Baby Spit'.

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    End of the Line

    Number 305, December 2006, Flypast magazine

    Spitfire PK726 - the final example to come off the Castle Bromwich production line.

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    Spitfire PR.XIX - THUM's up!

    Number 312, July 2007, Flypast magazine

    Reporting from the 60th anniversary celebrations at Woodvale on Merseyside.

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    Spitfire PR.XIX - Rule of THUM

    Number 312, July 2007, Flypast magazine

    Ken Ellis

    Ken Ellis pays homage to the weather-recce unit that made RAF history and helped to found the BBMF.

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    Spitfire PR.XIX - Leaving the Jets Standing

    Number 312, July 2007, Flypast magazine

    Daniel Ford

    Daniel Ford pays tribute to the Spitfire PR.XIX, a propeller-driven thoroughbred that had the jets beaten!

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    UK-Bound, Part 1

    Number 313, August 2007, Flypast magazine

    Daniel Ford

    With the Spitfire prototype trainer on its way to the UK, Daniel Ford chronicles its fascinating history.

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    Spitfire Swansong

    Number 315, October 2007, Flypast magazine

    Andrew Thomas

    Andrew Thomas outlines the last big battle between Spitfires of the US Eighth Air Force and the Luftwaffe.

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    Lambeth's Famous Spitfire

    Number 316, November 2007, Flypast magazine

    Norman Franks

    In London, the Imperial War Museum proudly displays a Spitfire. Norman Franks relates its Battle of Britain pedigree

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    Spitfire Detectives

    Number 317, December 2007, Flypast magazine

    Peter R Arnold , Shlomo Aloni , Zdenek Hurt

    Peter R Arnold joined forces with Shlomo Aloni and Zdenek Hurt to reveal the provenance of a restoration project.

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    Own Goal!

    Number 317, December 2007, Flypast magazine

    Erik Mannings

    Spitfire pilot Laurie Frampton was blown out of the sky by his own bomb! Erik Mannings describes his incredible career.

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    Spitfire Detectives

    Number 318, January 2008, Flypast magazine

    Peter R Arnold , Shlomo Aloni , Zdenek Hurt

    Peter R Arnold, Shlomo Aloni and Zdenek Hurt conclude how they revealed the provenance of a restoration project.

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    You Won't Catch Me in Malta!

    Number 320, March 2008, Flypast magazine

    Bill Simpson , Bruce Blanche , David Ross

    Bruce Blanche, Bill Simpson and David Ross re-examine the case of Spitfire pilot Sgt 'Bud' Walcott - deserter or enigma?

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    RAF at 90

    Number 321, April 2008, Flypast magazine

    IR Gleed

    We celebrate the RAF's 90th anniversary - that's Ibsley's Wing Leader, Wg Cdr I R Gleed, with his personalised Spitfire

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    You Won't Catch Me in Malta!

    Number 321, April 2008, Flypast magazine

    Bill Simpson , Bruce Blanche , David Ross

    Bruce Blanche, Bill Simpson and David Ross conclude their re-examination of the case of Spitfire pilot Sgt 'Bud' Walcott.

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    The Perfect Spitfire?

    Number 324, July 2008, Flypast magazine

    Frank B Mormillo , Rod Lewis

    Proud owner Rod Lewis thinks he has a perfect example, and he's not alone. Frank B Mormillo profiles a new shape in Texas.

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    Spitfire in the Park

    Number 324, July 2008, Flypast magazine

    John Molyneux

    The tranquillity of a Merseyside park was shattered when a Spitfire dived into it. John Molyneux describes how a school had a miraculous escape.

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    Vietnam Prelude

    Number 324, July 2008, Flypast magazine

    The first strikes on Viet Minh forces in what became the First Vietnam War were very probably conducted by Spitfires of the RAF's 273 Squadron.

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    Turkish 'Delight'

    Number 324, July 2008, Flypast magazine

    Peter George

    Ferry pilot Peter George remembers a flight packed with 'character-building' moments!

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    On Silver Wings

    Number 326, September 2008, Flypast magazine

    Clive Rowley

    Sqn Ldr Clive Rowley explains the story behind the unusual wartime scheme newly applied to the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight's Spitfire IX.

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    Dawn Patrol

    Number 192, July 1997, Flypast magazine

    Norman Edwards

    The arrival of Mark VIII Spitfires at the end of 1943 turned the tide of the air war in Burma, Norman Edwards was there with 155 Squadron

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    Sojourn in Italy

    Number 191, June 1997, Flypast magazine

    Robert Bell

    Shot down over Italy in the harsh winter of 1944, Lt Bob Bell was helped by an Italian family and a group of partisans to return safely to Allied lines.

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    Spitfires on Guard

    Number 191, June 1997, Flypast magazine

    Jim Simpson , Robert Rudhall

    In the concluding 'episode' of this two-part feature, Jim Simpson and Robert Rudhall present another selection of Spitfires which have in the past 'stood on guard' at various locations in the UK.

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    Spitfires on Guard

    Number 190, May 1997, Flypast magazine

    Jim Simpson , Robert Rudhall

    In the concluding 'episode' of this two-part feature, Jim Simpson and Robert Rudhall present another selection of Spitfires which have in the past 'stood on guard' at various locations in the UK.

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    Spitting Fire

    Number 331, February 2009, Flypast magazine

    Nigel Walpole

    Gp Capt Nigel Walpole relates 234 Squadron's exceptional part in the Battle of Britain, including September 4 when it 'bagged' an unprecedented 15 'kills'.

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    Tribute to a Kiwi ‘Ace’

    Number 336, July 2009, Flypast magazine

    Jarrod Cotter

    Brendon Deere, owner of Spitfire PV270 – restored in honour of his uncle New Zealand fighter ‘ace’ Air Cdr Alan Deere – talks to Jarrod Cotter about the project.

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    Brothers in Arms

    Number 342, January 2010, Flypast magazine

    Andrew Thomas

    In the first of two features on Spitfire pilot Rodney Simmonds, Andrew Thomas describes the victories claimed by Rodney and his brother, Peter.

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    On Show

    Number 347, June 2010, Flypast magazine

    We present a list of UK-based Spitfires currently on display, and those awaiting their turn.

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    On the Wing

    Number 347, June 2010, Flypast magazine

    Steve Beebee

    Steve Beebee examines the Spitfire’s great legacy and details the UK-based flyers and those being rebuilt.

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    In Focus: Supermarine Spitfire

    Number 347, June 2010, Flypast magazine

    This month we look at the UK’s population of Supermarine Spitfires and some of the people who fly them.

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    The Fighter Recce Sphinx

    Number 206, September 1998, Flypast magazine

    Bert Horton

    Bert Horton recalls his time flying spitfires and meteors with 208 squadron in the middle east

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    Picture of the Month

    Volume 36, Issue 08, 2008, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    An iconic study of Spitfire Mk Is of 611 Sqn is this month's offering

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    Gingered Up

    Volume 36, Issue 08, 2008, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    A UK-based Spitfire once flown by a famous RAF fighter ace has returned to the air refreshed after a six-year restoration, as Richard Paver reports

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    DATABASE: Photo-recce Spitfires

    Volume 36, Issue 04, 2008, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Dr Alfred Price

    Spitfire specialist Dr ALFRED PRICE details the genesis and development of the photo-reconnaissance variants of Supermarine's elegant fighter:

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    Spitfire "Body Bags"

    Volume 35, Issue 02, 2007, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Dr Alfred Price

    Dr Alfred Price investigates a 1943 RAF proposal to carry groundcrew in canvas bags mounted on a Spitfire's wings

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    Birth of the Spitfire

    Volume 34, Issue 04, 2006, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Harry Griffiths

    The last surviving member of the 1936 Spitfire design department, Harry Griffiths, talks to Ian Frimston PLUS we reveal previously unpublished Spitfire documents

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    Getting the Picture

    Volume 34, Issue 01, 2006, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Bill Carr

    Lt Gen Bill Carr CMM DFC CD recalls flying the blue Spitfires of the RAF's No 683 Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

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    Greater Than the Sum of its Parts

    Volume 33, Issue 06, 2005, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    The Editor reports from Duxford on a special occasion involving a two-seat Spitfire

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    Image of SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE, THE: Part 2: Griffon-Powered (Pt. 2)

    SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE, THE: Part 2: Griffon-Powered (Pt. 2)

    Modellers Datafile Richard A Franks , Robert Humphreys

    Part 2: Griffon Powered. Full chronology of the type's development and operational use. Photo coverage of preserved examples. Variants, squadrons, operators, production. Color side-views. Scale fold out plans. Includes Manchester and Lincoln. Kit, decal and accessory listing.

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    Spitfire Diorama

    Volume 9 Issue 2, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Steve Binchley

    With thoughts of the Battle of Britain, Steve builds the 1/72 Tamiya Spitfire Mk I in a diorama setting

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    Spitfires against Japan Part Three - 1945

    Volume 8 Issue 9, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Steve Nichols

    In his concluding article covering the Spitfire’s use against Imperial Japan, Steve covers RAF and RAAF Mk VIII operations, colour schemes and markings on the India/Burma front during 1945

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    Airfile 16 – Spitfire Mk IX: RAF Service 1942-45 Part Two

    Volume 8 Issue 8, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Paul Lucas describes the colour schemes and markings of the Spitfire Mk IX in North Africa, Southern and Northwest Europe 1943–1945

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    Modelling Spitfires against Japan

    Volume 8 Issue 7, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    To complement Steve Nichols’ historical article about ‘Spitfires against Japan’, Tony O’Toole builds a trio of tropicalised Spitfire Mk Vcs, and offers a comparison of the Special Hobby kit and the upgraded release by Eduard

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    Spitfire Gate Guardian

    Volume 5 Issue 10, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Martin Garrett

    For the 70th Anniversary of the Spitfire’s first flight, Martin models Mk Vb EP120, with a little difference! 90 Years of ‘Loyalty’ by Kev Baxter

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    Spitire Parade - 1

    Volume 5 Issue 4, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Dave Brown , Peter

    Father and son ‘modelling team’, offer details of a selection of their 1/48 scale Spitfire models

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    No 616 Squadron – The Spitfire Years

    Volume 5 Issue 3, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Neil Robinson

    Briefly describes the unit’s wartime operations and models the Spitfire types used by No 616 (South Yorkshire) Squadron

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    Supermarine Type 300 - First Flight

    Volume 5 Issue 3, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Paul Lloyd

    Describes the Supermarine Type 300 and builds the Spitfire prototype in 1/48 scale as she looked on her maiden flight

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    Spitfires over Japan

    Volume 5 Issue 3, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Paul Lucas , Tom Spencer

    Describes the operations and markings of Spitfires used during the Allied occupation of Japan, with archive photos and colour illustrations by Jon Freeman

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    The Prototype Spitfire’s Colours

    Volume 5 Issue 3, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Paul Lucas

    Describes the various colours applied to the prototype Spitfire, K5054, with archive photos and colour illustrations by Jon Freeman

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    Spitfire Colours Down Under

    Volume 5 Issue 1, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Neil Robinson

    Looks at the colour schemes of the RAAF’s Spitfires - and models a quintetof Aussie Spits to 1/48 scale, whilst Jon Freeman offers nine pages of colour scheme artwork

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    BPF Seafire Mk III

    Volume 4 Issue 11, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Tony O'Toole

    Converts the recent Airfix 1/72 scale Spitfire Mk Vc into a BPF Seafire L Mk III using the latest MAM Resin Update Set

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    Wandering Caribous: Pt 3

    Volume 4 Issue 8, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Vic Scheuerman

    Concludes his three part mini-series of modelling the wartime aircraft of No 442 Sqn RCAF, filling-in the Spitfire gap

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    in-depth build of ‘Johnnie’ Johnson’s keg-carrying Spitfire Mk IX

    Volume 3 Issue 6, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Graham Green

    followed by an in-depth build of ‘Johnnie’ Johnson’s keg-carrying Spitfire Mk IX, JE•JJR, by master modeller, Graham Green

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    Spitfire 45 gallon ‘torpedo shaped’ drop tanks

    Volume 3 Issue 6, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Paul Lucas

    Paul Lucas describes the use of the 45 gallon ‘torpedo shaped’ drop tank used by hundreds of Spitfires, including ML407, on D-Day, and produces an exclusive to ‘MAM’ readers, 1/48 scale ‘D-Day Spitfire resin conversion set offer...

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    D-Day Spitfires

    Volume 3 Issue 6, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Neil Robinson

    Continuing our D-Day coverage, Neil Robinson models Spitfire Mk IXe, ML407, as it looked on D-Day, 6 June 1944...

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    Image of Spitfire MK I - V (Combat Legends)

    Spitfire MK 1-V (Combat Legends)

    Peter Caygill

    In the furious skies of the Battle of Britain, one aircraft captured the imagination of the British people - it was the Supermarine Spitfire. This diminutive and elegant fighter represented the last hope against invasion by Hitler's unstoppable Blitzkrieg. Reginald Mitchell's innovative design was born of racing seaplanes built to win the Schneider Trophy - the most famous air races of the Twenties and Thirties. The Mk I first flew in 1936 and the type entered RAF service in 1938. Wartime development was rapid. Part of the success story was the Rolls-Royce Merlin engine. As this improved, so did the Spit. The Mk V was built in greater numbers than any other model and provided Fighter Command's backbone during 1941-42. This is the perfect introductory book for the general reader, enthusiast and modeler alike wishing to find a succinct yet detailed introduction to the design and history of the Spitfire. Why was the aircraft conceived? What was it like to fly on a mission? Who were the people who designed it and became famous for flying it? What were its virtues and vices? These and many more questions are answered here, plus a host of illustrations that show variations of color schemes used in different operational theatres and rare photographs taken when the heat was on.

    9/04/2005

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    Personal Album

    Volume 4, Issue 05, 1976, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Our selection this month comes from an album submitted by Mr AL Homersham of Epson, Surrey, and features aircraft seen in the middle east during 1946-48

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    The first of the many

    Volume 4, Issue 03, 1976, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    CF Andrews

    C. F. ANDREWS and E. B. MORGAN trace the origins of the Supermarine Type 300, which firs t flew 40 years ago this month and was destined to earn undying fame as the greatest fighter of its age-the Spitfire.

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    Parish's Famous Flight

    Number 197, December 1997, Flypast magazine

    An Engineer Flies A Spitfire To A Remote And Besieged Italian Base In Order To Repair Another Spitfire!

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    Kent's Own Squadron

    Volume 58, Issue 01, 1996, Air Pictorial

    Robin Brooks

    Robin Brooks tells the story of No 131 'County of Kent' Sqn and its Spitfires.

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    Design Analysis: Spitfire, Hurricane and Me 109 564

    Volume 55, Issue 12, 1993, Air Pictorial

    Roy Braybrook

    Three of the most famous fighters of the Second World War viewed from a modem aircraft designers standpoint by ex-designer Roy Braybrook.

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    Image of Merlin Power: The Growl Behind Air Power in World War II

    Merlin Power: The Growl Behind Air Power in World War II

    Victor Bingham

    The Rolls-Royce Merlin is considered by many to be the most outstanding liquid-cooled reciprocating piston engine of World War II. It powered the majority of Allied aircraft in Europe, including British and American designs. This book examines the origins of the engine's development from its predecessor, the Kestrel, through its single-stage conception to its two-speed, two-stage final form. Twenty-two Merlin powered aircraft are then examined in depth with examinations of development, design, construction and eventual operation. Wonderful design drawings by Lyndon Jones are themselves masterpieces. Included amongst the aircraft described in the book are the Avro Lancaster, Lincoln and York, the de Havilland Mosquito and Hornet, the Bristol Beaufighter II and IV, the Hawker Hurricane and Supermarine Spitfire, the North American Mustang, the Handley Page Halifax, the Curtiss P40 Kittyhawk and the Vickers Wellington.

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    Folland Aircraft

    Volume 39, Issue 12, 1977, Air Pictorial

    Peter Lewis

    EVERY AIRCRAFT is the direct reflection of the personality and predilections of its designer, and in its more than seventy years ' existence the British aircraft industry has produced its full quota of ou'tstanding creative engineers, one of the most talented and versatile being Henry Philip Folland. Born in Cambridge in 1889, Folland 's interest in flying was aroused in 1907, but his first employment was in the expanding automobile business when he was apprenticed to the Lanchester Motor Company, and worked in succession with the Wolseley, Swift and Daimler concerns. Activity in aviation was increasing in parallel, and in 1912 the Royal Aircraft Factory at Farnborough gained a recruit when Folland arrived there as assistant designer; notable types for which he was subsequently responsible were the F.E.2b, S.E.4 and S.E.5

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    Image of Supermarine Spitfire MK. I-XVI: In RAF-SAAF-RAAF-RNZAF-RCAF & foreign service (Arco-Aircam aviation series, no. 4)

    Supermarine Spitfire MK. I-XVI: In RAF-SAAF-RAAF-RNZAF-RCAF & foreign service (Arco-Aircam aviation series, no. 4)

    Richard Ward

    Supermarine Spitfire MK. I-XVI: In RAF-SAAF-RAAF-RNZAF-RCAF & foreign service (Arco-Aircam aviation series, no. 4)

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    Image of Supermarine Spitfire MK. I-XVI: In RAF-SAAF-RAAF-RNZAF-RCAF & foreign service (Arco-Aircam aviation series, no. 4)

    Supermarine Spitfire MK. I-XVI: In RAF-SAAF-RAAF-RNZAF-RCAF & foreign service (Arco-Aircam aviation series, no. 4)

    Richard Ward

    Supermarine Spitfire MK. I-XVI: In RAF-SAAF-RAAF-RNZAF-RCAF & foreign service (Arco-Aircam aviation series, no. 4)

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    Image of Scale Warplanes, Volume I: Modelling the Messerschmitt Bf 109 & Supermarine Spitfire (Scale Warplanes, Volume I)

    Scale Warplanes, Volume I: Modelling the Messerschmitt Bf 109 & Supermarine Spitfire (Scale Warplanes, Volume I)

    Learn how to model two of the most famous fighters of WWII. These two planes (the Messerschmitt Bf 109 & Supermarine Spitfire) formed the backbone of the Luftwaffe Jagdwaffe and RAF Fighter Command from the Battle of Britain through till the end of the war. With detailed step-by-step model photography, specially commissioned walkaround photography, scale drrawings and wartime shots, this book provides all the details needed to model the mail versions of the Bf 109 including the 109E "emil" and the most popular Spitfire Marks, the Mks V and IX.

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    Image of Supermarine Spitfire - Aero Series 10

    Supermarine Spitfire - Aero Series 10

    Staff of Aero Publishers

    Supermarine Spitfire - Aero Series 10 [Jun 01, 1966] Staff of Aero Publishers and Uwe Feist

    1/06/1966

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    Image of USAAF Fighter Units: Europe 1942-1945 (Osprey Airwar 8)

    USAAF Fighter Units: Europe 1942-1945 (Osprey Airwar 8)

    Rene J Francillon

    This book traces the combat history of USAAF fighter units in the European theatre of World War 2. Major aircraft types are all covered, and their missions detailed. Aircraft markings and aircrew uniforms are shown in full colour illustrations.

    15/07/1977

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    Image of Spitfire Flying Legend (General Aviation)

    Spitfire Flying Legend (General Aviation)

    John M Dibbs

    As much a national hero as Wellington, Nelson or Montgomery, the Supermarine Spitfire has become the most recognisable icon of World War 2 for several generations of Britons. From the throaty growl of its Rolls-Royce Merlin, or Griffon, to its beautifully tapered elliptical wings, the Spitfire is a true aeronautical thoroughbred. Regarded by many as the saviour of the Sceptred Isle 'in its darkest hour', the Spitfire is without a doubt the most famous combat aircraft the world has ever seen. 1996 celebrates the 60th anniversary of the fighter's first flight, and this lavishly illustrated volume serves as a tribute to the airworthy survivors of today.

    15/04/1996

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    Image of Merlin-Powered Spitfires - Warbird Tech Vol. 35

    Merlin-Powered Spitfires (Volume 35)

    Kevin Darling

    Supermarine Spitfire is today seen as one of the greatest fighter aircraft ever built. Go to any airshow and there will be airframes powered by the Rolls-Royce Merlin. Some will be Mustangs, possibly a Lancaster, even a Hawker Hurricane, however it is likely that the carrier of the engine will be a Supermarine Spitfire. Each type has its own particular soundwave, and that of the Spitfire is not only distinctive but a source of great pleasure to its many fans. It is the fighter that characterized the British effort in World War II. This book offers details on Spitfire development, technical cutaways, and in-depth information on fighters, reconnaissance, and Spitfires in the Battle of Britain. Warbird Tech Volume 35.

    1/01/2002

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    Image of Griffon-Powered Spitfires - Warbird Tech Vol. 32

    Griffon-Powered Spitfires - Warbird Tech Vol. 32

    Kevin Darling

    With more than 30 volumes now available, this series is one of the best sources of information for modellers and aviation enthusiasts. Each volume is jam packed full of excerpts, drawings, exploded views, cutaways, assembly line, and repair depot photographs taken from original tech manuals.

    22/11/2001

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    Image of Supermarine Spitfire

    Supermarine Spitfire

    Ted Johnstone

    Interactive CD - ROM featuring archive and contemporary film footage with 360 degree panoramas of interiors and exteriors, scale plans, camouflage and marking guides, technical data files, development and service histories. This CD takes you as close as you'll get to the pilot's seat of a Spitfire! Everything but the smell !

    20/04/2001

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    Image of American Eagles, Volume 1: American Volunteer Fighter Pilots in the RAF, 1937-43

    American Eagles, Volume 1: American Volunteer Fighter Pilots in the RAF, 1937-43

    Tony Holmes

    The first of two books in a new illustrated series examining the history of the pilots, units and aircraft that formed the US Eighth Air Force's VIII Operations. Written by recognized authorities, each book contains a detailed narrative accompanied by hundreds of rare photographs, beautiful color profiles, detailed nose art scrap views, and unit emblems.

    16/05/2001

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    Image of Supermarine Spitfire (Osprey Modelling Manuals 18)

    Supermarine Spitfire (Osprey Modelling Manuals 18)

    Osprey Modelling Manual 18 examines Reginald Mitchell’s classic Spitfire — the only RAF type in continuous production throughout WWII (over 20,000 were built in some 40 major variations), and an airframe adaptable as a fighter, fighter-bomber and PR aircraft. This book provides all the details needed to model the main Spitfire Marks — the Mks V and IX — and other Spitfire variants. Includes a full roundup of the models available on the market, details of where you can see the real thing, a select bibliography, and survey of websites of interest.

    25/03/2002

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    Image of Supermarine Spitfire II -Pilot's Notes (Pilot's Notes Collection)

    Supermarine Spitfire II -Pilot's Notes (Pilot's Notes Collection)

    Air Ministry

    A series of books that provide, for the first time, the detailed information every pilot needs to know about the aircraft they are flying. Each book in the series covers all aspects of a popular aircraft type and is illustrated throughout with photographs and diagrams.

    1/04/2004

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    Image of Spitfire on my Tail

    Spitfire on my Tail

    Ulrich Steinhilper

    Ulrich describes his 150 grueling missions as a fighter pilot par excellence, until being shot down and captured over England in October 1940.

    30/08/2004

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    Image of Supermarine Spitfire Pilot's Flight Operating Instructions

    Supermarine Spitfire Pilot's Flight Operating Instructions

    Royal Air Force

    The epitome of grace, beauty and design, the Supermarine Spitfire was one of the most deadly fighters of WWII. The Spitfire prototype, designed by Supermarine s Chief Designer R.J. Mitchell, first flew in 1936. By the time the Battle of Britain began in earnest, nineteen Spitfire squadrons were available to the RAF. Their pilots were most often tasked with engaging Luftwaffe fighters, including the Bf-109. With its superior maneuverability, it proved more than a match. This pilot s flight operating handbook, for the Model IIa and IIb, was originally produced by the Royal Air Force during World War II. It has been slightly reformatted but is reproduced in its entirety. It provides a fascinating view inside the cockpit of one of history s great planes.

    8/09/2008

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    Image of The Flying Greek: An Immigrant Fighter Ace's WWII Odyssey with the RAF, USAAF, and French Resistance

    The Flying Greek: An Immigrant Fighter Ace's WWII Odyssey with the RAF, USAAF, and French Resistance

    Col Steve N Pisanos USAF (Ret)

    Steve N. Pisanos’s The Flying Greek is both the classic tale of an immigrant’s bond with America and an aerial adventure. When young Pisanos arrived in the U.S. in 1938, he worked, studied English, and learned to fly. He earned a private pilot’s license in 1941, and soon after Germany invaded Greece, he volunteered for the embattled British Royal Air Force. He served with the 268 and 71 Eagle Squadrons. The 71 Eagle Squadron was one of three Eagle squadrons comprised of U.S. volunteers. In 1942, he became a naturalized U.S. citizen while in London, England. He was the first individual in American history to become a citizen while outside the U.S. border, and his becoming a citizen allowed him to be commissioned a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army Air Forces.

    In riveting detail, Pisanos recounts his combat record, from fighter sweeps and bomber escort missions to dogfighting, flying the Spitfire, the P-47, and the P-51. While flying a P-47 named Miss Plainfield, he scored his first aerial victory on May 21, 1943. By January 1, 1944, he had become an ace. After his tenth confirmed kill, he crash-landed his P-51 in France and spent six months with the French Resistance, successfully evading capture. Because of his exposure to the French operations, the Air Force could not risk his capture again, so he returned to the U.S. and became a test pilot at Wright Field where he also attended the Air Force’s test pilot school.

    Despite grave danger, Pisanos set aside his pride, fears, and misgivings to help achieve a greater good. The Flying Greek is an entertaining and remarkable journey that will interest historians and aviation enthusiasts.

    15/02/2008

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    Image of Spitfire in Combat

    Spitfire in Combat

    Alfred Price

    Probably the most famous fighter aircraft of all time, the Supermarine Spitfire's distinctive shape and sound mark it out from most other aircraft of the World War II period. From the biplane era of the 1930s to the start of the jet age in 1944, the Spitfire, through continuous modification and development, remained at the forefront of fighter design and proved itself equal or superior to any of its competitors. During the same period, other variants of the Spitfire proved highly effective in the photographic reconnaissance role. Alfred Price covers aspects of the aircraft’s history as diverse as the "Speed Spitfire," specially modified in 1938 for an attempt on the world landplane speed record. Fully illustrated, this is an ideal primer for those whose interest in the Spitfire is just beginning, while the details of all WWII key aviation battles are sure to add to the knowledge of those who are already familiar with this classic aircraft.

    1/11/2009

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    Image of 249 At War : The Authorized History of the Raf's Top Claiming Squadron of WWII

    249 At War : The Authorized History of the Raf's Top Claiming Squadron of WWII

    Brian Cull

    This is an exciting history of the Royal Air Force's foremost fighting squadron, formed during WWII, details the unit's combat roles and the planes they flew.

    1/10/1997

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    Image of Sigh for a Merlin : Testing the Spitfire

    Sigh for a Merlin : Testing the Spitfire

    Alex Henshaw

    Alex Henshaw spent the early days of World War II at Eastleigh, England, testing the immortal Spitfire fighter with Jeffrey Quill before being appointed Chief Test Pilot at Supermarine's new factory in Castle Bromwich. Thousands of Spitfires were tested and manufactured at this site throughout the war, by the end of which 37,000 test flights had been made with Alex Henshaw flying an estimated ten percent of all Spitfires ever built. Often landing without aids of any kind, his breathtaking aerobatic style and complete mastery of the aircraft were to save his life on several occasions.

    1/01/2000

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    Image of Spitfire - Flying Legend: 60th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain

    Spitfire - Flying Legend: 60th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain

    John M Dibbs

    As much a national hero as Wellington, Nelson or Montgomery, the Supermarine Spitfire has become the most recognisable icon of World War 2 for several generations of Britons. From the throaty growl of its Rolls-Royce Merlin or Griffon, to its beautifully tapered elliptical wings, the Spitfire is a true aeronautical thoroughbred. Regarded by many as the saviour of the Sceptred Isle 'in its darkest hour', the Spitfire is without a doubt the most famous combat aircraft the world has ever seen. The year 2000 celebrates the 60th anniversary of the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire’s ‘finest hour’. This lavishly illustrated volume makes a stunning pictorial tribute to the airworthy survivors of today.

    1/08/2000

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    Image of SPITFIRES OVER SICILY: The Crucial Role of the Malta Spitfires in the Battle of Sicily, January - August 1943 (Hurricanes Over Tobruk)

    SPITFIRES OVER SICILY: The Crucial Role of the Malta Spitfires in the Battle of Sicily, January - August 1943 (Hurricanes Over Tobruk)

    Brian Cull

    On July 1943, British and American amphibian and airborne forces began landing in Sicily. The plan, codenamed Operation Husky, fixed Malta as the launching site for the fighter and fighter-bomber offensive.

    "Spitfires over Sicily" provides a day-by-day historical account of Malta Spitfire operations, leading up to and during the invasion, interspersed with personal accounts of some of those involved. Illustrated with up to 100 photographs including Spitfires of many of the squadrons involved, their pilots and adversaries, this account features Spitfires versus Messerschmitts and Macchis plus RAF and USAAF versus JG53 and JG77 and Italians. It also includes USAAF's 31st Fighter Group and a host of personal accounts.

    1/08/2002

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    Image of Air War for Burma: The Allied Air Forces Fight Back in South-East Asia 1942-1945 (The Bloody Shambles Series, Vol. 3)

    Air War for Burma: The Allied Air Forces Fight Back in South-East Asia 1942-1945 (The Bloody Shambles Series, Vol. 3)

    Christopher Shores

    In his monumental work Bloody Shambles, Volume Two, Christopher Shores described in detail the British retreat out of Burma, culminating at the end of May 1942. The monsoon then brought operations on land and in the air virtually to a halt for several months as the British and Indian forces prepared to retake Burma.

    The Japanese however, had very different ideas. Air War for Burma picks up the story from the beginning of June 1942 and follows the hard-fought campaigns through to the end of the war in August 1945. Here the activities of the RAF and USAAF during the desperate fighting of 1942-44, resulting ultimately in victories at Imphal and Kohima, are fully recounted. No less a forgotten air force than was the 14th ‘Forgotten Army’, the RAF particularly was denied the most modern and effective aircraft until late in the fighting, struggling to survive with obsolescent equipment against frequently superior Japanese machines.

    Described herein are the operations during the First and Second Arakan Campaigns; support for the Chindits in their long-range penetrations deep into enemy-held territory; the savage sieges of Imphal and Kohima; and the final victorious advance across the plains of Central Burma to Mandalay and Rangoon. Detailed also are the activities over the Indian Ocean and the East Indies of the Royal Navy’s aircraft carriers and the aircrews of the Fleet Air Arm.

    Painstakingly researched from official sources, log books, letters and interviews, this is far and away the best reference work on the subject, and completes the set.

    1/09/2005

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    Image of Supermarine Spitfire: 1936 onwards (all marks) (Owners' Workshop Manual)

    Supermarine Spitfire: 1936 onwards (all marks) (Owner's Workshop Manual)

    Alfred Price

    The legendary Supermarine Spitfire receives the famous Haynes manual treatment with the full co-operation and authorization of the Royal Air Force. This is a unique guide for anyone wishing to own and operate a Spitfire, as well as a wonderful insight into the engineering and construction of this remarkable airplane; includes a developmental history of the aircraft, cutaway drawings, and the restoration and repair process . Presented mainly in color, this highly detailed and attractively designed manual is based around the restoration of the Spitfire Mk XVI at RAF Coningsby.

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    Image of The Battle of Britain Story (Story series)

    The Battle of Britain Story (Story series)

    Graham Pitchfork

    The summer of 1940 witnessed the greatest air battle in history and its 70th Anniversary provides a unique occasion to remember the men—dubbed by Winston Churchill as "The Few"—who fought over the skies of Britain to prevent the Luftwaffe from gaining air superiority, which would have paved the way for Hitler to invade the UK. With the march of time, this is likely to be the last significant anniversary where survivors of the historical battle can join in the various celebrations. Graham Pitchfork charts the development of the epic battle fought by Fighter Command as it reacted to the changes in the Luftwaffe's strategy, reaching a climax on September 15th before finally coming to a conclusion in October 1940. In addition to the exploits of the pilots in the air, the contribution of the many ground organizations that played such a crucial role is also highlighted in this lavishly illustrated book

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    Moonraker Spitfires

    Number 166, May 1995, Flypast magazine

    Spitfire Factories Under Attack, So Garages And Light Industrial Works Were Taken Over. The Production Of 'Back Street' Spitfires In Wiltshire.

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    Malayan Memories

    Number 166, May 1995, Flypast magazine

    In Malaya The Raf Was Engaged On Active Operations Into The The 1940S, Including The Career Of The Last Three Operational Spitfires

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    Answering the Call

    Number 124, November 1991, Flypast magazine

    Chuck Sloat examines the response of the Air Transport Auxiliary to the urgent need to move Spitfires to Malta.

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    Spitfire to Mirage

    Number 110, September 1990, Flypast magazine

    Start of our Israel spotlight. Profile of Dany Shapira, flying Spitfires since 1948.

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    Type Report

    Number 106, May 1990, Flypast magazine

    Nick Veronico on Corsair survivors and Peter Arnold on 'new' Spitfires.

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    Lost over Dunkirk

    Number 106, May 1990, Flypast magazine

    Recollection's of a Spitfire pilot fighting in the skies over the evacuation beaches.

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    Type Report

    Number 99, October 1989, Flypast magazine

    Peter R Arnold

    Peter R Arnold examines what happened to the Spitfire 'stars' of The Battle of Britain after they took off their make-up.

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    First to Fall

    Number 79, February 1988, Flypast magazine

    Bill Norman

    Bill Norman uncovers the inter-linked fate o! a Spitfire and a Heinkel.

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    Thums Up!

    Number 72, July 1987, Flypast magazine

    Aldon Ferguson outlines the task of the Spitfire equipped Thum Flight.

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    Year of the Spitfire

    Number 64, November 1986, Flypast magazine

    John Foreman

    John Foreman and Christopher Shores start a two-part survey of the men who became 'Aces' flying the Spitfire.

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    Spitfire AR501

    Number 58, May 1986, Flypast magazine

    Michael Burns

    Michael Burns details the history of the Shut-tleworth Spitfire, the subject of our superb free colour poster.

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    Secrets from the Drawing Board

    Number 57, April 1986, Flypast magazine

    We present a glimpse of Spitfire projects and developments to be featured in a forthcoming work on the subject

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    Airworthy Spitfires

    Number 56, March 1986, Flypast magazine

    Peter Arnold

    Peter Arnold looks at the 26 Spitfires currently airworthy, and the other projects waiting in the wings.

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    Year of the Spitfire

    Number 55, February 1986, Flypast magazine

    Marcia Piermattei finds a Spitfire two- seater alive and well in Aspen, Colorado.

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    The Spitfire Legend

    Number 54, January 1986, Flypast magazine

    John Foreman

    John Foreman starts our 'Year of the Spitfire' celebration in a controversial manner.

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    Spitfire in Plastic!

    Number 51, October 1985, Flypast magazine

    Specialised Mouldings plan a 'production run' of static replicas.

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    Spitfire rebuild

    Number 32, March 1984, Flypast magazine

    Mike Searle

    One of the most charismatic aircraft on the air show scene is Spitfire XIV G-FIRE. Mike Searle details the fascinating story of how it was acquired and rebuilt for Spencer Flack.

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    I Remember

    Number 8, March 1982, Flypast magazine

    Ralph Havercroft

    Wing Commander Ralph Havercroft's recollections of his first flight in a Spitfire.

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    The Case Of The 'Phantom' Dog-Tags

    Number 249, April 2002, Flypast magazine

    David Hanna

    David Hanna Recounts The Mystery Find In Italy That Reunited An Australian Spitfire Pilot With His Long-Lost Id Tags.

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    Spitfire For The People

    Number 243, October 2001, Flypast magazine

    Nigel Price

    From The Workshop: Supermarine Aero Engineering Is Working On A Project That Would Have Made R J Mitchell Proud. Nigel Price Reports.

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    Spitfire Restorations: La 198

    Number 234, January 2001, Flypast magazine

    Ken Ellis

    Ken Ellis Visits East Fortune To View Progress On The Restoration Of Spitfire F.2I Lai98, Inside After Over 30 Years Of External Display.

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    Spitfire Restorations- K9942

    Number 234, January 2001, Flypast magazine

    First In A From The Workshop Double-Bill. V-S Spitfire I K9942's Restoration Into Pre-War Status Has Been Completed By The Medway Aircraft Preservation Society. Jarrod Cotter Went 'Back To Basics' At The Unveiling Of This National Treasure.

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    Battle Of Britain- Bbmf's 'Baby' Spitfire

    Number 229, August 2000, Flypast magazine

    Robert Rudhall

    Robert Rudhall Explores The History Of The Battle Of Britain Memorial Flight's Spitfire Ii P735O — A 'Battle' Veteran.

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    Image of No. 91 'Nigeria' Squadron (Osprey Aviation Elite 3)

    No. 91 'Nigeria' Squadron (Osprey Aviation Elite 3)

    Peter Hall

    From its humble beginnings as a reconnaissance flight, using second-hand aircraft at the very end of the Battle of Britain, No 91 'Nigeria' Squadron went on to become one of the most famous units in RAF Fighter Command. It achieved outstanding results using new low-level interception tactics along the south coast of England, employing the very latest marks of Spitfire. Indeed, it was one of the few fighter units to be Spitfire-equipped throughout World War 2. Manned by a multifarious band of pilots from across the globe, No 91 'Nigeria' Sqn also produced its fair share of aces.

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    Fargo Express

    Number 217, August 1999, Flypast magazine

    Norman Lees

    Norman Lees Recounts The Background To A Strictly 'Limited Edition' Spitfire! John Dibbs Photography.

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    Battle Of Britain Day

    Number 183, October 1996, Flypast magazine

    September 15, 1940, Recalled By 19 Sqn Spitfire Pilot, George Unwin.

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    Image of No. 43 'Fighting Cocks' Squadron (Osprey Aviation Elite 9)

    No. 43 'Fighting Cocks' Squadron (Osprey Aviation Elite 9)

    Andy Saunders

    Known as the 'Fighting Cocks', No 43 Sqn has been a part of the RAF since 1916, and is still in service today. This volume deals exclusively with the unit's exploits during WW2, covering its service during the evacuation of Dunkirk and the Battle of Britain, as well as the years spent supporting the Allied cause in North Africa and the Mediterranean. Flying Hurricanes from November 1939, and re-equipped with Spitfires in early 1943, 'Fighting Cocks' pilots scored 159 kills during the war and over a dozen of them 'made ace'. This book presents a full picture of the squadron, its men and its aircraft.

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    Image of The Spitfire Story DVD and Book Pack (Story series)

    The Spitfire Story DVD and Book Pack (Story series)

    Peter R March

    Arguably the most famous fighter of all time, The Spitfire Story continues the history of this iconic aircraft. From the end of the war to its final operational RAF sortie in 1954, the Spitfire was continually developed. A celebration of R.J.Mitchell's unique contribution to aviation history, The Spitfire Story contains a complete listing of preservation projects including, the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight. Appendecies include technical specifications, significant milestones and a list of all airworthy airframes. The DVD contains dramitic wartime film and colour footage of surviving Spitfires in flight. This is the definitive documentary of a thoroughbred fighter.

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    Image of 315 Squadron

    315 Squadron

    Wojtek Matusiak

    On 8th January 1941, the Air Ministry approved the formation of a new Polish fighter squadron at RAF Acklington, just north of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Most of the pilots were from the Polish city of Deblin, a famous nursery for Polish airmen, and 315 squadron became known as "Deblinski". The Polish pilots flew Hurricanes, Spitfires and Mustangs and served at bases throughout England and Norhtern Ireland during the Battle of Britain and until the end of the war. This book is the definitive work by leading Polish aviation authorities and the only book available in English on this subject.

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    Image of Douglas Bader (Airlife Classics)

    Douglas Bader (Airlife Classics)

    John Frayn Turner

    Based on extensive interviews which the author had with Douglas Bader during the last thirteen years of his Bader's life, this biography tells the full story from his childhood to his work with the disabled in later life. After a flying accident in which he lost his legs, Douglas Bader was invalided out of the RAF. At the outbreak of war in 1939 he was recalled to the RAF and returned to flying. He fought in the Battle of Britain and later in nearly one hundred offensive fighter patrols. Following a mid-air collision he was captured and became a prisoner-of-war and was imprisoned in Colditz. The story of his war-time activities, both in the air and as a POW, is told in some detail and makes fascinating reading. These activities helped him to achieve celebrity status and in later life much of his time was given to promoting causes for the disabled. John Frayn Turner's account of a remarkable life is a fitting tribute to one of the country's most heroic figures.

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    Image of Seafire vs A6M Zero: Pacific Theatre (Duel)

    Seafire vs A6M Zero: Pacific Theatre (Duel)

    Donald Nijboer

    Products of vastly different design philosophies, the Seafire F III and the A6M Zero were never intended to meet in combat, and never should have. Yet the harsh necessities of war intervened and these two planes were pitted against each other in the last dogfight of World War II, high above the Japanese home lands. The Zero, with its clean design, low weight and high lift, was extremely nimble at low speeds and ideally suited to the job it was intended to do. In contrast, the Spitfire was not designed as a shipboard fighter; it was a short-range interceptor, intended for operations from established airfields and supported by a well stocked infrastructure of spares and qualified maintenance personal. With a different twist on the Duel concept, this book examines these two iconic fighters and their two very different histories; one was 'adapted' for a role it was never intended to carry out, the other was purpose built and proved to be one of the finest fighters of World War II. Using fantastic artwork and intimate first-hand accounts, the author discusses the decline of the Japanese Naval Air Force and its principal fighter, the Zero, in contrast to the British Seafire, as it overcame its critics to become the best pure carrier interceptor of the war and emerge victorious in the last aerial duel of World War II.

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    Image of Spitfire vs Bf 109: Battle of Britain (Duel)

    Spitfire vs Bf 109: Battle of Britain (Duel)

    Tony Holmes

    Churchill's words, "never was so much owed by so many to so few," came to encapsulate how, in a few critical months, the entire fate of the British Empire, if not the war, hung in the balance, to be determined not by world leaders or armies of millions, but by a handful of pilots fighting tirelessly in the skies over Britain.

    Tony Holmes describes the key conflict of the Battle of Britain, the clash between the Spitfire and the Bf 109 - detailing not only the key elements of both aircraft types - the airframe, engine, armament and flying characteristics, but also the pilots' training and both British and German tactics. The growing influence of radar and the efforts of British coastal defences are also examined, as are real-life engagements - from both German and British perspectives. With a wealth of previously unpublished material including first-hand accounts from the veterans who strapped themselves into these now legendary machines as well as lavish illustrations and cockpit-view artwork, this book puts the reader in the midst of a dogfight. This is a unique insight into one of the greatest duels of history in the world's first major aerial battle.

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    Image of Supermarine Seafire (Crowood Aviation Series)

    Supermarine Seafire (Crowood Aviation Series)

    Kevin Darling

    Always overshadowed by its far more famous sibling the Spitfire, the Seafire was an aircraft adapted initially in haste to fill a large gap in the Fleet Air Arm's fighter inventory. The first Seafires were developed from the early marks of Rolls-Royce Merlin-powered Spitfire, but although the structure was strengthened to absorb some of the landing loads characteristic of carrier operation, the airframe would exhibit some alarming failures, a trait that continued through the life of the type. The next series of Seafires were Griffon powered and followed their RAF counterparts in introducing blow canopies and, later, modified wing planforms.

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    Image of Supermarine Spitfire MK.XII (Allied Wings)

    SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE MK.XII (Allied Wings)

    Phil LISTEMANN

    The full history of this first Griffon engined Spitfire variant is told in 44 pages, with the list of all the claims, the losses and other appendices. The success of this variant was satisfactory enough to open a new chapter of the Griffon engined marks.

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    Image of 2nd Tactical Airforce: V. 4: Squadrons, Camouflage Markings, Weapons and Tactics 1943 - 45

    2nd Tactical Airforce: V. 4: Squadrons, Camouflage Markings, Weapons and Tactics 1943 - 45

    Christopher Shores

    This superb new book completes the in-depth analysis of the 2nd TAF's operations from its initial formation in 1943 through to the ultimate defeat of Germany in May 1945. The informative text is interspersed with rare personal accounts from pilots as well as mini-biographies and specialist text boxes on key missions. This fourth volume includes detailed coverage of areas such as camouflage and markings and ordnance systems as carried by the wide range of aircraft deployed by 2nd TAF, and which supplements much of the material in the first three volumes.The authors have uncovered a significant amount of rare and previously unpublished material which will delight modellers around the world. Meticulous listings of all wings, commanding officers, bases and squadrons are provided, along with brief histories of each. There is also a dedicated section on Group Support Units and Repair Units, as well as a valuable section on tactics used by 2nd TAF arranged by type and role. Supplemented by fabulous colour artwork throughout, and rare pilots' albums, this is essential volume for all military aviation enthusiasts.

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    Image of 2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 2: Breakout to Bodenplatte, July 1944 to January 1945

    2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 2: Breakout to Bodenplatte, July 1944 to January 1945

    Chris Thomas

    It has been more than 30 years since the original and highly acclaimed history of 2nd Tactical Air Force was first published, and it has been long out of print. Now at last, this book is a completely rewritten and greatly expanded account of this important command's vital contribution to the Invasion of Normandy and the defeat of the forces of the Third Reich in Western Europe. The 2nd TAF, equipped with rocket- and bomb-carrying Typhoons, Tempests, Spitfires, Mosquitos, Mustangs and medium bombers, flew ground-attack and tank-busting missions in support of Montgomery's 21st Army Group as it advanced through Normandy and northwest Europe in 1944-45. The medium bomber units struck at enemy transport, ammunition dumps, and communication targets. The 2nd TAF comprised British, Canadian, Polish, Czech, Norwegian, French, South African, Australian, and New Zealand crews. This second volume covers the breakout from Normandy, the advance across the Low Countries, and the German ripostes in the Ardennes and Operation 'Bodenplatte' in the winter that followed.

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    Image of FIGHT FOR THE SKY: The Story of the Spitfire and Hurricane

    FIGHT FOR THE SKY: The Story of the Spitfire and Hurricane

    Douglas Bader

    Pen and Sword Books are proud to be reissuing this, the only book written by the legendary 'legless' ace Douglas Bader (immortalized by the film Reach For the Sky).

    He tells the inspiring story of the Battle of Britain from the viewpoint of 'The Few'. Using superb illustrations he traces the development of the Spitfire and Hurricane, and describes the nail-biting actions of those who flew them against far superior numbers of enemy aircraft. As an added bonus, other well-known fighter aces including Johnnie Johnson, "Laddie' Lucas and Max Aitken contribute to Douglas's book, no doubt out of affection and respect.

    This is a really important contribution to RAF history by one of the greatest - and certainly the most famous - pilots of the Second World War.

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    Image of Spitfire Ace: Flying the Battle of Britain

    Spitfire Ace: Flying the Battle of Britain

    Martin Davidson

    The Battle of Britain was one of the most famous air battles in the history of warfare, one filled with ruthless organisation, brilliant control, and command. At its heart is one particular figure, a legend ever since—the RAF fighter pilot—as well as one particular plane, a piece of machinery that has almost mythic historical glamour: the Supermarine Spitfire. This engaging volume reintroduces the few that flew in the Battle of Britain and includes interviews with many of the surviving veteran Spitfire pilots. Fully illustrated with 16 pages of photographs and contemporary archive material, it provides a vivid portrait of the fighter boys and their finest hour, their planes, and Fighter Command.

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    Image of R.J. Mitchell: Schooldays to Spitfire

    R.J. Mitchell: Schooldays to Spitfire

    Gordon Mitchell

    This book tells the definitive story of how the Spitfire, Britain's WWII single-seat fighter plane, was designed, built, and tested, and how close it came to not happening at all.

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    Image of Spitfire Wingman from Tennessee

    Spitfire Wingman from Tennessee

    James R Haun

    Climb into the cockpit of an 80-year aviation adventure, told by the bold character who lived it. More than the memoir of an aerobatic master born to fling his body through cloudbanks, Spitfire Wingman from Tennessee offers a unique bird's-eye perspective on events and personalities of WWII and the Cold War. His desire to fly fighters won him a stint as famed New Zealand ace Johnny Checketts' wingman. Personal encounters with Patton, Vandenberg, Yeager, Truman and Nixon are replayed with perception and wit. While jockeying P-40s, P-51s, and P-47s, he was privileged to see the war both from twenty thousand feet and as Staff Officer at 9th Air Force Headquarters in Brussels, where he watched 'the Brass' play chess with armies on two world fronts. A stripped-down Thunderbolt fighter-bomber became his personal 400-mph runabout.
    Beginning with fragile fabric-covered biplanes, the Colonel bears hands-on nostalgic witness to historic transformations steering manned flight from art toward automated science. Starting out as the Memphis 'Boy Wonder' who built his first airplane in 1933 by adapting a motorcycle engine, this gifted flyer takes you on an intimate inside journey from barnstormer to dog-fighter, to threading the Himalayan 'Hump,' to Berlin Airlift commander, then on to Presidential Squadron leader - finally becoming Chief Pilot of the Military Air Transport Service. Balancing dry humor with just enough technical detail to please aviation buffs, this self-revealing autobiography thunders on all twelve cylinders with sky-sweeping appeal.

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    Image of Wings on My Sleeve (Phoenix Press)

    Wings on My Sleeve (Phoenix Press)

    Eric Brown

    Eric Brown went to Germany in 1939 on an exchange course, and his first experience of the war came when the Gestapo arrested him, not knowing he was an RAF pilot. The rest is history. He is the only man alive to have flown every major and most minor combat aircraft of the Second World War (as well as all the early jets), and has been interviewed by the top Nazis. While testing the Nazi jets in war-stricken Germany, he interviewed (among others) Hermann Goering and Hanna Reitsch. A living legend among aviation enthusiasts, his amazing life story deserves to be told in full—from crashing in front of Winston Churchill to unmasking a Neo-Nazi ring in the 1950s to his terrifying flights in primitive jets and rockets.

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    Image of Faith, Hope and Malta: Ground and Air Heroes of the George Cross Island

    Faith, Hope and Malta: Ground and Air Heroes of the George Cross Island

    Tony Spooner

    This is the most comprehensive account of the Air Forces in Malta during Word War II. Malta was a vital base from which Allied aircraft could inflict serious damage on the crucial Axis supply route to Rommel in North Africa. In order to secure that route, the might of the Luftwaffe and Italian Air Forces were thrown together against the tiny island, affecting not just the defending servicemen and women, but the entire population. This book vividly describes how the fighters, bombers, torpedo, and reconnaissance aircraft of the RAF and FAA took the fight to the enemy and triumphantly succeeded with every odd stacked against them.

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    Image of Spitfire: Icon of a Nation

    Spitfire: Icon of a Nation

    Ivan Rendall

    The Spitfire was the finest fighter plane of its time, the weapon that saved Britain in its darkest hour. It was also a thing of beauty, beloved by the heroes who fought in it and the public that cheered as it flew overhead. Now, a magnificently produced book—filled with first-person reminiscences and lavishly illustrated with archival and contemporary photographs—pays fitting tribute to this enduring World War II icon.

     

     

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    Image of Spitfire in Combat

    Spitfire in Combat

    Alfred Price

    Probably the most famous fighter aircraft of all time, the Supermarine Spitfire's distinctive shape and sound mark it out from most other aircraft of the World War II period. From the biplane era of the 1930s to the start of the jet age in 1944, the Spitfire, through continuous modification and development, remained at the forefront of fighter design and proved itself equal or superior to any of its competitors. During the same period, other variants of the Spitfire proved highly effective in the photographic reconnaissance role. Alfred Price covers aspects of the aircraft’s history as diverse as the "Speed Spitfire," specially modified in 1938 for an attempt on the world landplane speed record. Fully illustrated, this is an ideal primer for those whose interest in the Spitfire is just beginning, while the details of all WWII key aviation battles are sure to add to the knowledge of those who are already familiar with this classic aircraft.

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    Image of Spitfire Saga: Rodney Scarse DFC

    Spitfire Saga: Rodney Scarse DFC

    Angus Mansfield

    Rodney Scrase's life in the RAF began in an old airship shed where he took the King's shilling in May 1941. He went on the fly Spitfires as far afield as America and Malta with No. 72 and No. 1 Squadrons, finally being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross in 1944. He was released from service with a record of four destroyed and three damaged, having taken part in the invasion of Italy, the attack on Tunis in 1943, and a stint as an instructor in the art of air to air gunnery. In Spitfire Saga, using Scrase's log books and interviews with the man himself, Angus Mansfield presents the unique story of one man's experience of flying the most iconic aircraft of World War II. Complete with thorough historical context and a true insider view of life as an RAF fighter pilot, this book is an excellent addition to any history enthusiast's library.

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    Image of ANZACs: Classic Warbirds No.12

    ANZACS, THE: Classic Warbird Series No. 12 (Classic Warbirds)

    Malcolm Laird

    An updated and extended version of the now out-of-print CW volume on ANZAC Spitfire pilots, this new book in the highly acclaimed "Classic Warbirds" series tells the stories of ten Australian and New Zealand pilots in WW2, flying Spitfires and Hurricanes based in Britain, the Middle East and the CBI theater. Based on interviews with the pilots and their written memoirs, this is a fascinating look at the personalities inside the fighter planes. Profusely illustrated with photos (many from the pilots' own collections) and Malcolm Laird's superb artwork, this is essential reading for students of WW2 air warfare, enthusiasts, and modelers.Malcolm Laird has been producing books, decal sheets and model kits for many years, and his "Ventura" products are highly regarded all over the world. Co-author Steve Mackenzie is an aviation historian.

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    Image of Spitfire Leader: The Story of Wing Cdr Evan 'Rosie' Mackie, Dso, Dfc & Bar, Dfc (Us), Top Scoring Rnzaf Fighter Ace

    SPITFIRE LEADER: The Story of Wing CDR Evan "Rosie" Mackie, DSO, DFC (US), Top Scoring RNZAF Fighter Ace

    Max Avery

    Evan "Rosie" Mackie is one of the least-known high-scoring fighter aces of the Commonwealth Air Forces during World War II. Joining the RNZAF in January 1941, he was posted to the UK on completion of training to serve with the New Zealand Spitfire Squadron, No 485, thence to North Africa to join 243 Squadron, RAF, which he commanded during the invasions of Sicily and Italy. He next led 92 Squadron and by early 1944, when his operational tour ended, he had already claimed some 15 enemy aircraft shot down, and shared two more. A further tour took him to Holland in 1944. Shortly before the conclusion of hostilities he was promoted again, this time to lead 122 Tempest Wing, bringing his personal victory tally to 20 and three shared in aerial combat, with three and another shared destroyed on the ground. Mackie is one of the two top-scoring New Zealanders, and this is a study of his military career, written by a journalist, aided by an historian.

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    Image of From Dogfight to Diplomacy: A Spitfire Pilot's Log 1932-1958

    FROM DOGFIGHT TO DIPLOMACY: A Spitfire Pilot's Log 1932-1958

    Donald MacDonell

    This is a tale of human fortitude in a life shaped by a love of flying, military service, war, imprisonment, diplomatic service and a wife who was eventually diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic. MacDonell's service career began in the 1930s when he studied at RAF Cranwell. After a spell at No 54 Squadron he went on detachment to the Fleet Air Arm and was posted to the Middle East and Malta. Shortly before the war he was promoted to Squadron Leader and worked at the Air Ministry during the Phoney War. When hostilities commenced he became CO of No 64 Squadron at Kenley carrying out convoy support operations and eventually fighting in the Battle of Britain over Kent. Now with a DFC, he is given command of a squadron at Leconfield to train urgently required new pilots before coming south again to Hornchurch. Eventually he is shot down over the English Channel and is rescued by a U-boat. This resulted in a lengthy period spent at several PoW camps in enemy occupied Europe and Germany. During this period he was involved with the famous 'Wooden Horse' escape and was eventually freed by advancing Russian troops. Upon his return to the UK he was promoted Wing Commander and worked on the Cabinet Office staff before moving to Headquarters Flying Training Command. He was then appointed Chief Flying Instructor at Cranwell before successfully applying for the post of British Air Attache in Moscow. Here he met the legendary leaders of post-war Russia, Khrushchev, Bulganin and Mikoyan and assisted in the organisation of the first civilian flights between London and Moscow. MacDonell has written this memoir with both humour and understatement; it is all too easy to underestimate the hardship he endured whilst captive and the significant part he played in battle and then in diplomatic circles.

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    Image of SWIFT TO BATTLE: 72 FIGHTER SQUADRON RAF IN ACTION: Volume 1: Re-formation in 1937, The Phoney War, Dunkirk, The Battle of Britain and Offensive Operations over Occupied Europe 1942

    SWIFT TO BATTLE: 72 FIGHTER SQUADRON RAF IN ACTION: Volume 1: Re-formation in 1937, The Phoney War, Dunkirk, The Battle of Britain and Offensive Operations over Occupied Europe 1942

    Tom Docherty

    This first of three volumes traces the history of 72 Fighter Squadron, one of the premier squadrons in the Royal Air Force. The aircraft flown, operational personnel and missions flown are fully described with firsthand accounts from pilots and both air and ground crew.

    Having been first established in 1917 the squadron was disbanded in February 1918. It was re-formed in February 1937 from 'B' Flight of 1 Squadron and was equipped with Gloster Gladiators. In 1939 it was re-equipped with Spitfires which were used in air defense and convoy protection sorties following the start of the war. In 1940 the squadron moved to assist in the evacuation of Dunkirk. During The Battle of Britain, 72 spent the early days at RAF Acklington as part of 13 Group before moving south during September to assist the main defense force. The squadron then flew penetration 'Circus' missions over occupied Europe with the intention of causing havoc to the German forces and also to lure German fighters into combat.

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    Image of Spitfire Mark V

    Spitfire Mark V

    Peter Caygill

    Produced in greater numbers than any other Spitfire variant, the Mark V, powered by a 12-cylinder Rolls-Royce engine, put the RAF Fighter Command on an equal playing field with the Luftwaffes Fw 190 and remained in service until the end of World War II.

    As an operational history, this illustrated account tells the aircrafts story from the viewpoint of the various squadrons that flew it, drawing on pilots combat reports, firsthand anecdotes, RAF intelligence and archival photography to present a detailed account of some of the most memorable air battles over northern France, Belgium and the Netherlands.

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    Image of In A Now Forgotten Sky: The 31st Fighter Group in WWII

    In a Now Forgotten Sky: The 31st Fighter Group in WW2

    Dennis C Kucera

    The first commercial history of the 31st Fighter Group, the highest-scoring fighter group in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations.

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    Image of Al Deere: Wartime Fighter Pilot, Peacetime Commander

    AL DEERE: Wartime Fighter Pilot, Peacetime Commander

    Richard Smith

    After having joined the RAF in 1937, New Zealander Al Deere was in the thick of the action right from the start of World War II, serving with distinction over France and Dunkirk in May and June 1940 against the dreaded Messerschmitts. He survived a crash-landing during a head-on attack and helped to defend London and the south-east during the Battle of Britain effecting numerous escapes in tight combat situations. He went on to command a flight in 602 Squadron, to lecture in America, to command RAF Kenley, Biggin Hill and then to lead the 145 French Wing in France before becoming Wing Commander, Plans with 84 Group. Post-war, he took up many more significant postings including commander of North Weald, and Aide de Camp to HM the Queen. If it could be said that he had a "good war", he enjoyed an ever better peace. The author had the full co-operation of family, friends and colleagues when researching the source material to write this biography. It includes many of Deere's letters and papers on the tactics and strategy of combat, and his previously unpublished story, "Escape".

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    Image of On Special Missions: The Luftwaffe's Research and Experimental Squadrons 1923-1945 (Air War Classics)

    On Special Missions: The Luftwaffe's Research and Experimental Squadrons 1923-1945 (Air War Classics)

    J Richard Smith

    This is the remarkable story of the Verschuchsverband, the Trials and Research Unit of the Luftwaffe High Command, one of the most intriguing, clandestine and rarely-covered elements of the Luftwaffe before and during World War 2. Using previously unpublished recollections from pilots who flew secret, long-range reconnaissance and spy-dropping missions over England, Iraq, Poland and the USSR, as well as hundreds of rare and fascinating photographs, the book recounts the history, operations and aircraft of the unit. Among the unit's many tasks, it was charged with testing and introducing newly developed reconnaissance, bomber and nightfighter aircraft into operational service. These aircraft include 'exotic' types such as the Ar 234 jet, the huge Do 335 fighter and extreme high-altitude Ju 86R.

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    Image of Supermarine Fighter Aircraft

    Supermarine Fighter Aircraft

    Victor F Bingham

    The firm of Vickers Supermarine is rightly famous for the Spitfire, perhaps the best-loved and most recognizable aircraft in the world. It was a fighter par excellence, continually updated and modified. This development kept the Spitfire in active service throughout the war, and the development is told here in fascinating detail. However, the Spitfire was not Supermarine's only fighter and this book also discusses the Spitfire's experimental predecessors and the aircraft that came after it. These include the navalized version - the Seafire, and the ultimate development of the Spitfire theme - the Spiteful and the Seafang. This will be required reading for fans of the Spitfire and anyone interested in the heady early days of jet aircraft development in Britain.

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    Image of Air Combat Legends Volume 1-Supermarine Spitfire and Messerschmitt Bf 109

    Air Combat Legends Volume 1-Supermarine Spitfire and Messerschmitt Bf 109

    David Donald

    When the United States entered WWII it was ill prepared to meet the threat posed by Axis air forces equipped with modern fighting aircraft. That all changed as the American war machine rapidly geared up for the conflict and US aerospace companies rushed to develop and ready for service a range of state-of-the-art warplanes. Three fighters stand out as pivotal in helping turn the tide to the Allies' advantage - the legendary twin-boom Lightning, the massive Thunderbolt and enormously successful Mustang. This second volume in the Air Combat Legends series examines the development, service record, combat action, operators, missionsand weapons of these great aircraft. Superbly illustrated throughout, this is a 'must-have' volume for those who want the inside stories on the fighters that helped America win the war.

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    Image of Hurricane and Spitfire Pilots at War

    Hurricane and Spitfire Pilots at War

    Terrence Kelly

    The Hawker Hurricane and the Supermarine Spitfire were the two outstanding British-built fighter aircraft of World War II. In the Battle of Britain they formed the backbone of the RAF's famous victory against the Luftwaffe. Although often compared with each other by contemporary historians, many miss the point that each aircraft had its outstanding merits and served different purposes. This book looks at the operation of these aircraft in Europe, the Middle East and the Far East throughout World War II. It includes many first-hand accounts from the pilots themselves who relive exciting memories of flying the aircraft in combat.

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    Image of 2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 1: Spartan to Normandy, June 1943 to June 1944

    2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 1: Spartan to Normandy, June 1943 to June 1944

    Christopher Shores

    The 2nd TAF, equipped with rocket- and bomb-carrying Typhoons, Tempests, Spitfires, Mosquitos, Mustangs and medium bombers, flew ground attack and tank-busting missions in support of Montgomery's 21st Army Group as it advanced through Normandy and north-west Europe in 1944-45. The medium bomber units struck at enemy transport, ammunition dumps and communication targets. The 2nd TAF comprised British, Canadian, Polish, Czech, Norwegian, French, South African, Australian and New Zealand crews. The first volume in this three-book set deals with the formation and expansion of 2nd TAF from its inception in June 1943 for the next 12 months, and with the initial critical month of the invasion. This volume, as with the two subsequent volumes, is not only profusely illustrated with many little known photographs, and with Chris Thomas's masterly artwork, but also contains daily listings of all claims made against enemy aircraft, and all losses, damage and casualties suffered by 2nd Tactical aircraft and aircrews in carrying out their arduous duties.

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    Image of Spitfire & Hurricane

    Spitfire & Hurricane

    This unique celebratory dossier contains- as authentic facsimile documents in full color- some of the most fascinating files surrounding the creation, testing and deployment of these fabulous aircraft, along with the achievements of their pilots. Included in the pack are: A color illustrated 16-page booklet detailing the story of the Spitfire and Hurricane Cutaway drawings of a Spitfire and a Hurricane Blueprints for the Spitfire and Hurricane Facsimile of the original Air Ministry F.5/34 specification Flight Lieutenant JB Nicholson's Victoria Cross commendation Letters written by Battle of Britain pilots and facsimile pilots combat reports Fighter Command reports on Spitfire and Hurricane A full size facsimile newspaper front page from the Battle of Britain A souvenir photographic print of the Spitfire and Hurricane in flight

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    Image of 185: The Malta Squadron

    185: The Malta Squadron

    Featuring the diary entries of the airmen involved, a unique account of the epic battle for Malta as experienced by fighter pilots of Number 185 Squadron. In 1943, after helping to win the air war over Malta, the unit took part in the Allied invasions of Sicily and Italy taking the fight to the enemy by bombing and strafing targets in support of Allied ground forces. Including rare combat and intelligence reports, Anthony Rogers provides the reader with a clear understanding of the war in the air. Life in Malta's longest-serving fighter squadron is narrated as an often humorous and sometimes poignant tale - all the more so with the knowledge that some contributors never survived the war.

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    Image of Spitfires, Thunderbolts, and Warm Beer: An American Fighter Pilot Over Europe (The Warriors)

    Spitfires, Thunderbolts, and Warm Beer: An American Fighter Pilot Over Europe (The Warriors)

    Philip D Caine

    In 1941, before America entered World War II, determined young LeRoy Gover signed on with Britain’s Royal Air Force to fly the plane of his dreams, the fast, sleek Spitfire. When America joined the fight, he transitioned to the powerful P-47 Thunderbolt. Former USAF pilot and aviation historian Philip D. Caine has skillfully selected from the young flyer’s letters and diary entries to create a vivid portrait of the kind of man who helped win the war. A story of great courage, Spitfires, Thunderbolts, and Warm Beer is a testament to the many other brave men who served.

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    Image of SPITFIRES OVER MALTA: The Epic Air Battles of 1942

    SPITFIRES OVER MALTA: The Epic Air Battles of 1942

    Brian Cull

    This book tells the story of the RAF's gallant stand in 1942 to hold Malta against all odds and to save the island from invasion, which, had it happened could have changed the whole course of the war in the Middle East.

    Between March and October 1942, some 400 Spitfires reached the beleaguered island, flown mainly from the decks of aircraft carriers that had ventured at great risk into the hostile waters of the Mediterranean. Once established on the three bombed-scarred airfields of Luqa, Takali and Hal Far, the Spitfires flew daily sorties to repel the might of the Luftwaffe and Regia Aeronautica based in Sicily, just 60 miles away.

    The cost was high. Very few of the Spitfires survived more than a few weeks, sometimes only days. Moreover, almost 100 Spitfire pilots paid the supreme price, young men from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Rhodesia, together with volunteers from the United States serving with the RAF or RCAF. At times the fighting was intense. In April 1942, Malta suffered a greater tonnage of bombs than the UK did in any one month at the height of the Battle of Britain. More than 1,000 Maltese civilians lost their lives in 1942. But the sacrifice was not in vain. Malta held out and finally the Luftwaffe and Regia Aeronautica conceded the battle was lost with Malta's Spitfire pilots being credited with at least 600 aerial victories during this period.

    Told in true Brian Cull style, this well-researched, well-written and very detailed book is accompanied by rare photos and contains much new material, especially from the logbooks and diaries of the pilots themselves.

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    Image of Poles in Defence of Great Britain: July 1940 - June 1941

    POLES IN DEFENCE OF BRITAIN: A Day-by-Day Chronology of Polish Day and Night Fighter Pilot Operations: July 1940 - June 1941

    Robert Gretzyngier

    To the Polish volunteers who were to fly and fight so brilliantly and tenaciously throughout the Battle of Britain, the United Kingdom was justifiably known as 'Last Hope Island'. Many of them lost their lives, many achieved glory. This book is a tremendous account of their contribution in those hectic days before the RAF began to take the offensive across the Channel.

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    Image of Spitfires and Yellow Tail Mustangs: The 52nd Fighter Group in World War II

    Spitfires and Yellow Tail Mustangs: The 52nd Fighter Group in World War II

    Tom Ivie

    The USAAF 52nd Fighter Group enjoyed an outstanding record in World War II, but to date its story has never been told. Activated in January 1941, it moved to England in July 1942 for an assignment with the Eighth Air Force. It flew combat missions in Spitfires to France during the summer of 1942 before being reassigned to the invasion force attacking North Africa in November 1942. After moving to North Africa, it was assigned to the Twelfth Air Force and was again equipped with Spitfires. As part of the Twelfth Air Force, it flew combat missions in the Tunisian campaign, and during the invasion of Sicily. In mid-1944, the 52nd was reassigned to the Fifteenth Air Force and converted to P-51 Mustangs. During the remainder of the war, it flew bomber escort and strafing missions to targets in Italy, France, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Hungary, Rumania, and Yugoslavia. For its outstanding service the Group was twice awarded the Distinguished Unit Citation. During its long campaign, the Group destroyed more than 425 enemy aircraft in aerial combat and damaged 135 plus many more on the ground. The 52nd Fighter Group produced 21 Aces.

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    Image of Flying to the Limit: Testing World War II Single-Engined Fighters

    FLYING TO THE LIMIT: Testing World War II Single-engined Fighter Aircraft

    Peter Caygill

    During the years preceding and during World War II, the RAF and the Royal Aircraft Establishment were responsible for the selection and procurement of British military aircraft and also to evaluate their capabilities against captured enemy models whenever possible. During the lend-lease agreement with the USA, the RAF and Fleet Air Arm operated several American designs, each of which was tested to evaluate its potential. This book looks at the key area of fighter aircraft and includes the test results and pilot's own first-hand accounts of flying seventeen different models that were designed in the UK, America and Germany. The reader will learn of the possibilities of air superiority offered by these types and also their weaknesses. Types included are The Hawker Hurricane, Supermarine Spitfire, Boulton Paul Defiant, Hawker Tempest and Typhoon, Messerschmitt Bf 109, Focke-Wulf Fw 190, Brewster Buffalo, Curtiss Mohawk, Bell Airacobra, Curtiss Tomahawk, Curtiss Kittyhawk, North American Mustang, Grumman Martlet, Republic Thunderbolt, Grumman Hellcat and Vought Corsair. All aircraft that saw a great deal of action throughout the War and which are now part of legend.

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    TWO-MAN AIR FORCE: Don Gentile and John Godfrey: World War II Flying Legends (Pen & Sword Aviation)

    Philip Kaplan

    American volunteers Don Gentile (pronounced Jen-tilly) and John Godfrey flew together as leader and wingman respectively, with the USAAF 4th Fighter Group based at Debden near Cambridge in England. At the end of their missions with the 4th the two of them had accounted for over 58 enemy aircraft destroyed. Major Gentile had scored 22 air and 6 ground kills before he was returned to the USA to help raise money for the war effort. Major Godfrey was credited with 18 air and 12 ground kills before he was shot down and taken prisoner of war. This is the story of their amazing adventures and wartime partnership from their basic training in Canada and then onto England where they first flew the Supermarine Spitfire. It continues with their transfer to the USAAF 4th Fighter Group when the US entered the war and when the two were retrained to fly the P-47 Thunderbolt and eventually the superb P-51 Mustang. These two ace pilots loved life as much as flying - and as well as being hell-bent on destroying the enemy in the skies of Europe they also lived life to the full in their off-duty time in England.

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    Spitfire Diary: A Pilot's Story

    EAW Smith

    The Supermarine Spitfire was one of the greatest Allied fighter planes of World War II. Accounts of its successful air-to-air combat from the Battle of Britain to D-Day and the end of the war are the stuff of legend—but they do not tell the complete story. Author E.A.W. Smith, himself a Spitfire pilot, reveals the rest of the amazing story of this extraordinary fighting machine in this unique and landmark memoir.

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    Image of WINGS OVER SUEZ: The Only Authoritative Account of Air Operations During the Sinai and Suez Wars of 1956

    WINGS OVER SUEZ: The Only Authoritative Account of Air Operations During the Sinai and Suez Wars of 1956

    Brian Cull

    Guiding the reader meticulously through the details of the air conflict between the Israelis and their Arab neighbors from the end of the 1948-49 war, the authors, each an expert in his own field then accurately reconstruct a blow-by-blow account of the Anglo-French air attacks on Egyptian airfields and other targets. With contributions by many of the pilots involved, the book is profusely illustrated with 200 photographs, many extremely rare.

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    Image of The Air Battle for Malta: The Diaries of a Spitfire Pilot

    AIR BATTLE FOR MALTA, THE: The Diaries of a Spitfire Pilot

    James Douglas

    This book provides an intriguing and realistic account of the struggle for the possession of Malta during World War II. The air battle raged for two and a half years during which time 14,000 tons of bombs were dropped on a defiant population. The history is based on the diaries of Lord David Douglas-Hamilton, the author's uncle, who was the leader of a Spitfire squadron that defended the island during the worst of the crisis.

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    Image of The Story of the Spitfire: An Operational and Combat History

    The Story of the Spitfire: An Operational and Combat History

    Ken Delve

    To many people, the Spitfire was the embodiment of air fighting during World War II. The Spitfire Story presents a thrilling appraisal of this remarkable aircraft's fighting capability and the tactics of the pilots who flew it. Using official evaluations and reports, alongside technical and tactical developments, plus the recollections of Spitfire pilots, the book provides an unparalleled insight into the combat career of this legendary plane. Despite some problems with their new aircraft, the Fighter Command pilots of 1940 were generally delighted with the Spitfire – speed, maneuverability and fire-power were all far greater than they had been with the biplanes of only a year or so earlier. Tactics, training and experience were another matter, and the RAF was out of date. The air battles over Britain in late 1940 forged the Spitfire legend – but how justified was it? There were only nineteen Spitfire squadrons in Fighter Command during the Battle of Britain, but as the RAF turned to the offensive the numbers of Spitfire units dramatically increased. The combat initiative was lost to improved Bf109s and Fw190s, but developments in the Spitfire clawed back the advantage, with increased performance and, crucially, better training. By 1944 the Spitfire was operating as a fighter-bomber in various theatres of war, with new tactics and new problems. To many fighter-pilots having bombs strapped under the aircraft verged on an insult – but with aerial targets in short supply this was the most effective, but risky, way of taking the war to the enemy. The Spitfire Story details the introduction, development and successes of this incredible aircraft, and charts the training and skills of its pilots. It is a compelling account which will be welcomed by both enthusiast and general reader alike. Ken Delve is the author of more than twenty aviation books, including Bomber Command, D-Day: The Air Battle and Night Fighter.

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    Image of SILVERED WINGS: The Memoirs of  Air Vice-Marshal Sir John Severne KCVO OBE AFC DL

    SILVERED WINGS: The Memoirs of Air Vice-Marshal Sir John Severne KCVO OBE AFC DL

    John Severne

    John Severne joined the RAF in 1944 and gained his wings two months after World War II ended. This book captures the author's great passion for flying, whether it be in jet-fighters, light aircraft, helicopters or making model planes and gives details of his long a illustrious career. His first posting was to No 264 Night Fighter Squadron flying the de Havilland Mosquito. On a flying instructor's course at the Central Flying School, he flew a Lancaster, Spitfire and his first jet - the Vampire. Posted to Germany as a flight commander on a Venom squadron, he was awarded an Air Force Cross for landing an aircraft that had caught fire. As a Squadron Leader, he became Equerry to the Duke of Edinburgh. Then followed a period as chief instructor on Britain's first supersonic fighter, the English Electric Lightning. Later he became 'Wing Commander Ops' at the joint HQ of Middle East Command where he was involved in counter-terrorist operations in Aden. As Station Commander of RAF Kinloss, he was responsible for the introduction of the Nimrod in 1971 and at the height of the Cold War when these new anti-submarine aircraft were a vital part of Britain's defense.

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    Image of Diver! Diver! Diver!: RAF and American Fighter Pilots Battle the V-1 Assault Over South-East England 1944-45

    Diver! Diver! Diver!: RAF and American Fighter Pilots Battle the V-1 Assault Over South-East England 1944-45

    Brian Cull

    During the summer months of 1944, a daily onslaught by V-1 jet-propelled flying bombs, heading for London and southern England, was countered in the skies of Kent and Sussex.

    To the pilots, British press, and bewildered public, Hitler's 'secret weapons' became known variously as Divers, Buzz Bombs, Flying Bombs, Doodlebugs, Dingbats, Robots, Jet-Ships, P-Planes, Witches and even Farting Furies. But they were dangerous, with thousands of civilians losing their lives.

    Launched from the Pas de Calais in France, the V-1s came in over the Channel at between 1,000 and 2,000 feet at speeds approaching 400 mph. They proved a difficult target to intercept, much less to bring down. However, many fighter pilots did become 'aces', one alone accounting for 60 of them. By March 1945, when the aerial bombardment ended, a staggering 10,000 V-1s had been launched (including 1,500 from the air). However, with 42 per cent being destroyed by the defenses, half of these alone by the RAF, it is clear tens of thousands of people were saved.

    In this significant work, respected historians detail every known success by the defending pilots of over 13 nationalities, and where detected, record all locations and casualties of V-1 impacts in London and the south east. In doing so, they rely heavily not only on official documents and combat reports, but also on the vital accounts of the pilots themselves and those on the ground, many of which are quoted verbatim.

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    Image of BADER'S LAST FIGHT: An In-Depth Investigation of a Great WWII Mystery

    BADER'S LAST FIGHT: An In-Depth Investigation of a Great WWII Mystery

    Andy Saunders

    On 9th August 1941 one of the greatest icons of the Second World War, Douglas Bader, was shot down, captured and later incarcerated. But by whom, and how? Was it by one of his deadly German opponents, as Douglas Bader himself maintained, or was it by one of his own side?

    There has been much debate and controversy among historians and in 2003 the author of this book revealed for the first time that Bader may have been victim to 'friendly fire'. That revelation was followed by interest in the national press and later by a TV documentary.

    In this book aviation historian Andy Saunders develops his hypothesis, backed up by strong evidence and a wealth of statistics, and separates fact from fiction. He expertly dissects all the material relating to the day itself, and subsequent events. He has also continued the quest to find the legendary fighter pilot's aircraft, which holds vital clues. And he has startling new material to divulge here also.

    This book will fascinate all who read it and will be seen by most observers to be the final word on one of the great mysteries of the entire war.

    REVIEWS

    "...will interest enthusiasts and historians alike and will be seen by many to hold the final answer to one of the great mysteries of the European air war."August 2008, Flight Journal

    "...will appeal to historians and general readers intrigued by this mysterious event."Book News, 07/2008

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    Image of BRITAIN'S GREATEST AIRCRAFT

    BRITAIN'S GREATEST AIRCRAFT

    Robert Jackson

    During the last century the British aircraft industry created and produced many outstanding airplanes. These aircraft were world leaders in advanced technology, utilizing inventions by British engineers and scientists such as radar, the jet engine, the ejector seat and vertical take-off and landing. This book describes the design-history, development and operational careers of twenty-two legendary military and civil airplanes. Each one has played a significant part in aviation history.

    Sopwith Camel, SE.5, Bristol F2B Fighter and the Airco DH4 were all great successes in the relatively early days of flight. In the thirties the Bristol Bulldog fighter was an outstanding export success and the Short 'C' Class flying boat, later to become the Sunderland of World War II fame, pioneered the long-distance routes to the Empire. The pugnacious foreign policy of Hitler's Reich rung sudden alarm bells, rapid advances in fighting aircraft for the RAF became a premium objective. The brilliant Geodic construction of the Vickers Wellington bomber helped it survive terrible punishment throughout World War II, both the Hawker Hurricane and the Supermarine Spitfire saved England from invasion and the Bristol Beaufighter, de Havilland Mosquito and Avro Lancaster took the war to enemy soil.

    The Gloster Meteor became the word's first operational jet fighter and the English Electric Canberra became the RAF's first jet bomber and was manufactured under license in the USA as the Martin B-57. In post-war years the Vickers Viscount became the world's first turboprop airliner and eventually became Britain's best selling commercial aircraft, whilst the de Havilland Comet became the world's first jet airliner. Despite Britain's recessionary years in the 50s and early 60s, military success came with the beautiful Hawker Hunter, the super-sonic Fairey Delta experimental aircraft that broke the World Air Speed Record and the Vickers Valiant that pioneered the operational techniques to deliver Britain's nuclear deterrent. Later, there followed the Mach 2 English Electric Lightning and the ill-fated TSR-2, the cancellation of which is still regarded as one of the greatest mistakes ever made in British aviation history. Finally, the Harrier, the world's first vertical take-off and landing jet fighter that is still in service and now only being built in the USA.

    Finally the Harrier, the world's first vertical take-off and landing jet fighter, still in service and now being further developed in the USA.

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    Image of FROM NORTH AFRICA TO THE ARAKAN: The Engrossing Memoir of WWII Spitfire Ace Alan McGregor Peart DFC, RNZAF

    FROM NORTH AFRICA TO THE ARAKAN: The Engrossing Memoir of WWII Spitfire Ace Alan McGregor Peart DFC, RNZAF

    Alan Peart

    Alan Peart was born in Nelson, New Zealand. Joining 610 Squadron on completion of training, he served against the Germans and then the Japanese. Operating from 'Broadway' airstrip, his was the only spitfire not destroyed during air strikes.

    This is an excellent first hand account of the air war in such varied theaters. The author writes of the appalling living conditions and the issues the aircrew faced living far from civilization.

    He survived to become an ace and tell his remarkable story. He now lives in Hamilton, NZ .

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    Image of Spitfire Pilot

    Spitfire Pilot

    David Crook

    "Spitfire Pilot" was written in 1940 in the heat of battle when the RAF stood alone against the might of Hitler's Third Reich. It is a tremendous personal account of one of the fiercest and most idealised air conflicts - the Battle of Britain - seen through the eyes of a pilot of the famous 609 Squadron, which shot down over 100 planes in that epic contest. Often hopelessly outnumbered, in their state of the art Spitfires, Crook and his colleagues committed acts of unimaginable bravery against the Messerschmidts and Junkers. Many did not make it and the author describes the absence they leave in the squadron with great poignancy. "Spitfire Pilot" is justly regarded as one of the classics of WWII and this new paperback edition, 66 years on, includes an introduction by the historian Richard Overy.

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    Image of THE SPITFIRE SMITHS: A Unique Story of Brothers in Arms

    THE SPITFIRE SMITHS: A Unique Story of Brothers in Arms

    Rod Smith

    In late 2001 Rod Smith died tragically at his own hand, leaving behind a part-written autobiography and many notes. At the request of his family, his friend, the historian Christopher Shores, took on the task of seeking to complete the story as nearly as possible to how he believed Rod had wished it to be.

    Rod and his brother Jerry both became Spitfire pilots during World War II, leaving their home in Canada only to find themselves - purely by chance - serving together in the defense of Malta during 1942. Jerry had already gained some fame as the first pilot ever to land a Spitfire on an aircraft carrier (due to a faulty fuel feed after being launched to fly to the beleaguered island). Both showed immediate promise as fighter pilots, but by the end of that year Jerry was dead - last seen chasing a German bomber out to sea - while Rod had become an 'ace' and would receive the D.F.C.

    Two years later, serving as a squadron commander in Western Europe, he claimed six Messerschmitts down within a single week, and was involved in the shooting down of the first German jet aircraft to fall to British Commonwealth fighters. He ended the war as one of Canada's highest scoring aces, with more than 13 victories to his credit. Qualifying after the war both as an aeronautical engineer and as a barrister, he brought a keen and analytical intellect to a passionate interest in aviation and aerial combat, writing many letters and articles of great depth and insight. His untimely death was a great loss not only to his family and friends, but to the wider world of aviation history as well.

    This book, containing many diary entries from each of the brothers, is a testament to them.

    REVIEWS

    "...the most comprehensive treatment of the subject ever penned...one of a kind testament to the multi-faceted Rod Smith and to biographer Chris Shores." Aviation History, November 2009

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    Image of BIGGIN HILL WING 1941, THE: From Defence to Attack

    BIGGIN HILL WING 1941, THE: From Defence to Attack

    Peter Caygill

    This book is an in-depth study of England's most famous fighter station during the year of the Battle of Britain. It looks at the political upheaval within Fighter Command that saw the removal of Dowding and Park and their replacement by Sholto Douglas and Leigh-Mallory. The ongoing 'Big Wing' controversy and the resulting change in tactics during 1941 are examined. The main part of the book is a chronological account of the squadrons of the Biggin Hill Wing with particular emphasis on the pilots. The units covered include No.'s 66, 72, 74, 92, 124, and 609 Spitfire Squadrons and 264 Defiant Night Fighter Squadron.

    The author's research is based on combat reports and squadron Operation Record Books and first-hand accounts written by the participant pilots in the battles over southern England and northern France. Extensive appendices will include Air Combat Claims of the Wing, Operational Aircraft Losses, Details of Selected Operations and The Great Escape - the marked influence of ex Biggin Hill pilots on the escape from Stalag Luft III in 1944.

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    Image of The RAF Eagle Squadrons: American Pilots Who Flew for the Royal Air Force

    The RAF Eagle Squadrons: American Pilots Who Flew for the Royal Air Force

    Philip D Caine

    This amazing book brings to life the 245 brave Americans who became the legendary Eagle Squadrons of the Royal Air Force. Itching to get into the action before the United States was brought into the war in 1941, these pilots, each of whom has his biography recorded here, wanted to contribute to the war effort, stop the Nazi invasion of the free world, and fly the best fighters of the day.

    Through his remarkable research, Brigadier General Phil Caine makes these young men real people. We see their youthful faces, watch them grow up and learn to fly in the United States, make the momentous decision to join the RAF or RCAF, even though their country was not yet at war, endure the dangerous voyage to England, and, for over 40 percent of them, become a prisoner or die. They fall in love with English girls and agonize over the death of a comrade. And those who survived became the nucleus of the famed Fourth Fighter Group.

    The RAF Eagle Squadrons: American Pilots Who Flew for the Royal Air Force is a “must read” for the student of World War II and the history of air power, or the general reader who just wants a “captivating read.” Caine is the author of three other books on Eagles: American Pilots in the RAF, Spitfires, Thunderbolts and Warm Beer, and Aircraft Down!

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    Image of A SALUTE TO ONE OF 'THE FEW': The Life of  Flying Officer Peter Cape Beauchamp St John RAF

    A SALUTE TO ONE OF 'THE FEW': The Life of Flying Officer Peter Cape Beauchamp St John RAF

    Simon St John Beer

    In a quiet churchyard in Amersham is the grave of an airman who lost his life fighting in the skies over southern England in October 1940. The author happened to come across this grave in 1998 and after some initial enquiries discovered that nobody in the town was aware that 'One of the Few' Battle of Britain pilots lay at rest in their parish. He determined to discover more about the short life of this hero and undertook several years of research to piece together this biography.

    Peter joined the RAF in November 1937 on a four-year short service commission at the age of twenty. In July 1938 he was posted to No. 87 Squadron being equipped with the then new Hawker Hurricane fighter. After war had been declared the Squadron was posted to Boos in France in support of the British Expeditionary Force, becoming operational on 10 September 1939. In March 1940 he was transferred to 501 Squadron in Tangmere and then again in April to 74 Squadron as an operational pilot at Hornchurch, equipped with Spitfires. It was from here that he fought his part in the Battle of Britain. For those who may have forgotten 'The Few', this stirring and yet sad story tells of the all-too-short life of one of the 543 young men who gave everything to defend Great Britain from Nazi aggression.

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    Image of SPITFIRE!: The Experiences of a Battle of Britain Fighter Pilot

    SPITFIRE!: The Experiences of a Battle of Britain Fighter Pilot

    Brian Lane

    A poignant and evocative story, Brian Lane was killed in action shortly after the book was first published.

    A brilliant memoir of a noted Battle of Britain Spitfire ace. Originally published in 1942 with a limited circulation due to wartime paper shortages; it has remained out of print until now.

    Brian Lane was only 23 when he when he wrote his dramatic account of life as a Spitfire pilot during the Battle of Britain in the summer of 1940. Lane was an 'ace' with six enemy 'kills' to his credit and was awarded the DFC for bravery in combat. The text is honest and vibrant, and has the immediacy of a book written close the event, untouched, therefore, by the doubts and debates of later years. Here we can read, exactly what it was like to 'scramble', to shoot down Messerschmitts, Heinkels, Dorniers and Stukas and how it felt to lose comrades every day. Squadron Leader Brian Lane DFC was not only an exceptional fighter pilot but likewise a gifted leader, at all levels. In what was still a hierarchical and class conscious culture, 'Chiefy' Lane was different: he knew everyone under his command by first names, no matter how lowly their rank or status, and in the air he was always unflappable, calmly making the right tactical decision and in the process earning unlimited respect amongst pilots and aircrew. All these years later the survivors still speak of him with an unparalleled affection and respect bordering upon a holy reverence. High drama has never before been so characteristically understated, written, as it was, by the 'Finest of the Few'.

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    Image of NO.453 (RAAF) SQUADRON, 1941-1945: Buffalo, Spitfire (Famous Commonwealth Squadrons of WW2)

    NO.453 (RAAF) SQUADRON, 1941-1945: Buffalo, Spitfire (Famous Commonwealth Squadrons of WW2)

    Phil H Listemann

    No.453 Squadron had a very bad start in Singapore in 1941-42, where it was one of the fighter units dedicated to the defense of this British colony. The pilots were highly motivated and skilled, however they were unable to prevent one of the worst military disasters suffered by the British Empire. The squadron was disbanded after its evacuation from the island following a very difficult and costly struggle over the Malayan jungle. It was reformed a few weeks later in the United Kingdom, to represent the Australians in Europe, after the departure of its two sister squadrons -Nos.452 and 457 Sqns. The squadron was then given another opportunity to prove what it was capable of against a new enemy - the Germans. It took part in various major actions, with an impressive combat record, until the War's end and then took part in the occupation of Germany. More than 60 photographs (some published for the first time) and 10 color profiles illustrate the book which contains 88 pages and, like the other titles of this series, there is a full pilot roster and appendices covering claims, losses, maps, airfields and the operational diary.

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    Image of DUXFORD 1940: A Battle of Britain Base at War

    DUXFORD 1940: A Battle of Britain Base at War

    Dilip Sarkar

    The story of the Battle of Britain as experienced by the pilots who flew from Duxford air base in Cambridgeshire.

    Author has interviewed more Battle of Britain pilots than any other historian. Over 200 historic photographs, most originate from the personal albums of Duxford survivors and have never been reproduced before.

    The Imperial War Museum site at Duxford is rightly recognised as the premier aviation museum in Europe, hosting exciting air shows and where the evocative sight and sound of an airborne Spitfire can be experienced most days. Back in the dark days of 1940, however, when Britain alone defied Nazi Germany, Duxford was a crucial Sector Station in Fighter Command's front line.

    Flying Hurricanes and Spitfires, Allied fighter pilots scrambled from Duxford's grass runway time and time again to engage the enemy. Indeed, from here that legendary airman Douglas Bader frequently sallied forth to drive back the Luftwaffe that fateful summer, alongside other 'aces' such as Brian Lane, George 'Grumpy' Unwin, and Alan 'Ace' Haines. Duxford's Station Commander was the flamboyant Group Captain 'Woody' Woodhall, who doubled as the fighter controller; the introduction to this book features his hitherto unpublished memoir on the Battle of Britain period, leading the reader perfectly into this unique collection of extremely rare photographs presented by well-known aviation historian Dilip Sarkar. Most photographs originate in the personal albums of Duxford survivors, and provide, therefore, an incredible window through which we are able to glimpse the life, and death, at Battle of Britain Duxford.

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    Image of Supermarine Spitfire

    Supermarine Spitfire

    Alfred Price

    The Spitfire was one of the most—perhaps the most—successful fighter designs of all time and its service career linked the biplane era with the jet age. During World War 2 it occupied a unique place in the psyche of the British people and many believed it played a major part in saving the nation from defeat during the grim days of 1940. The wing design gave it a distinctive silhouette, which led to its almost legendary status during the Battle of Britain, and its inimitable drone was immediately recognizable to those on the ground. The Spitfire was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft and was the only Allied fighter in production throughout the war. This handsome new history looks in detail at the development of the Spitfire from its heroics in the Battle of Britain right through action in the European Theater.

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    Image of Last of the Few: 20 Battle of Britain Fighter Pilots Tell Their Extraordinary Stories

    Last of the Few: 20 Battle of Britain Fighter Pilots Tell Their Extraordinary Stories

    Dilip Sarkar

    Spitfire and Hurricane fighter pilots recount their experiences of combat during the Battle of Britain.2,927 aircrew of RAF Fighter Command fought and won the Battle of Britain in 1940, 544 lost their lives in action. They flew to battle in Spitfires and Hurricanes, Defiants and Blenheims, although it is the two former fighter types - single-seaters both - that still inspire and capture our imagination.The legendary legless fighter 'ace' Douglas Bader once said that the Battle of Britain was 'not won by a few aces, but by the average squadron pilot who collectively did their bit.' One of those men, Peter Fox, described himself and his fellows as mere 'also rans' - but clearly, without them, Fighter Command could not have prevailed. In this book, Dilip Sarkar relates their stories, researched through personal interviews, correspondence and contemporary archive material. Many of the pilots featured became 'aces' in the Battle of Britain, others achieved such status afterwards whilst others went into action only to be instantly blasted out of the sky without even having seen the enemy. Their collective experience, however, is typical of those who flew Spitfires and Hurricanes in 1940.

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    Image of IN ALL THINGS FIRST: NO. 1 SQUADRON AT WAR 1939 - 45

    IN ALL THINGS FIRST: NO. 1 SQUADRON AT WAR 1939 - 45

    Peter Caygill

    'In All Thing's First' looks in detail at 1 Squadron during the Second World War with particular emphasis on the pilots and its operational activities. 1 Squadron was active from a very early stage when it flew to France on 8 September 1939 as part of the Advanced Air Striking Force and played a significant role in the Battle of France. Unlike most other squadrons that fought in France, it also played a major part in the Battle of Britain in 11 Group. Later in the war the Squadron had considerable success in the night intruder role and also took part in the defense against hit-and-run raiders. It was highly active over occupied Europe carrying out Rhubarb and Ramrod operations including the dive bombing of V-1 installations. When the V-1 campaign began 1 Squadron was the highest scoring Spitfire squadron. During the Second World War it flew the Hawker Hurricane from 1939-42 before converting to the Typhoon. In early 1944 it received Spitfire IXs and ended the war with the Griffon-powered Spitfire F.21.

    The main parts of the book are as follows: 1) Early Days - a brief look at the history of 1 Squadron up to 1939, 2) The First Team - pilot profiles, 3) The Phoney War - Blitzkrieg - The Withdrawal from France, 4) The Battle of Britain, 5) Sweeps and Circuses in 1941, 6) Night Intruders, 7) The Typhoon - combat with Fw 190 Jabos and Ramrods, 8) The Spitfire, 9) The V-1 Campaign and conversion to the Spitfire F.21, 10) The Post War Years - the No.1 Squadron story brought up to date. There will also be extensive appendices to include aircraft losses, details of selected operations and pilot escape and evasion.

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    Image of Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IX (Topcolours KG15015)

    Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IX (Topcolours)

    Swiation , Szlagor

    Visual study of the classic British Merlin 61 engined fighter. Includes a brief overview of the appearance of the aircraft throughout its service in various theaters and air forces. Follows with an extensive range of full color profiles (both port and starboard) plus select upper plan and lower wing surface views illustrating 20 aircraft. This volume features: Mk.IXc from Squadrons: 306 'Polish', 303 'Polish', 73 RAF, 132 'Norwegian', 302 'Polish', 602 RAF, 309th USAAF, 340 'Free French' (x2), 317 'Polish', 324 RAF, 402 RCAF, 40 SAAF, Israeli 101st (x2), 4th USAAF, 313 'Czech', 81 RAF, 154 RAF, 329 'Free French' plus Mk.IXe of the Israeli 101 Squadron (x2). Also includes bonus double decal sheet representing all schemes in 1/72, 1/48 and 1/32 scales. English text with English and Polish captions; Topcolors 15. 36 pages.

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    Image of Barney Barnfather: Life on a Spitfire Squadron

    Barney Barnfather: Life on a Spitfire Squadron

    Angus Mansfield

    Riversdale Robert 'Barney' Barnfather was an RAF fighter pilot who flew Spitfires in action almost continuously from November 1941 until the end of the war in Europe. Barney was often in the thick of the fighting and saw action in the offensive sweeps over France, in the desperate air battle for Malta, the fighting in North Africa, the invasions of Sicily and Italy, and finally on the fringes of the Third Reich over Austria in 1945. This type of experienced and brave pilot formed the backbone of Fighter Command and after many operational flying hours, clashes with enemy aircraft and even a mid-air collision, he survived it all relatively unscathed. Thanks to the fascinating personal log book that Barney kept of his experiences, the contributions from his former colleagues and extensive historical research, Angus Mansfield has produced a detailed and enthralling history of a Spitfire pilot's escapades thousands of feet above the battlefields of the Second World War.

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    Image of No 126 Wing RCAF (Aviation Elite Units)

    No 126 Wing RCAF (Aviation Elite Units)

    Donald Nijboer

    The success of No 126 Wing began before the D-Day landings, but its phenomenal performance after the Normandy invasion has no simple explanation. True, it profited from being in all the right places at all the right moments during the war - D-Day and the breakout, Falaise Gap, Operation Market Garden, the winter offensive in the Ardennes, and crossing the Rhine into Germany. But other wings with 2nd TAF participated in the same operations, without achieving nearly the same success as No 126.

    As a self-contained unit, the five squadrons of Spitfires of No 126 Wing were self-sufficient in everything they did. When the order came to move - men, fuel, ammunition and everything vital for its operation picked up and drove to the next farmer's field or suitable meadow. Often traveling in the dark on bombed out roads, these ground units did an amazing job of not only finding their new bases of operation, but preparing the field for the fighters ready for the next day's flights. Every landing strip was temporary and just miles from the frontline. Home was a tent, a slit trench a place of safety. Dysentery was a common companion, making some pilots too weak to fly. Often they were shelled by German artillery and mortars, and many times they found themselves behind enemy lines.

    This is a truly unique look at one of the most effective air force units ever devised. Before D-Day 1944, a mobile fighter wing had never been tried before, but after the Normandy landings the ground forces could not move without their valuable support. This book examines the wing's operations chapter by chapter as defined by the major ground operations. It also highlights the effectiveness of the Spitfire in the fighter-bomber role, as well as in its more familiar air-superiority mission - the Spitfire clearly dominated the skies over the advancing armies and proved itself once again to be the most effective fighter of World War 2. But as successful as the wing was, it was only as strong as the young men who gave so much of their physical strength, intelligence and courage to make it happen. Squadron biographies, therefore, are also included, as well as biographies of the top aces and a close examination of the day-to-day operations of a mobile fighter wing.

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    SPITFIRE MANUAL

    Dilip Sarkar

    How to fly the legendary fighter plane in combat using the manuals and instructions supplied by the RAF during the Second World War. An amazing array of leaflets, books and manuals were issued by the War Office during the Second World War to aid pilots in flying the Supermarine Spitfire, here for the first time they are collated into a single book. An introduction is supplied by expert aviation historian Dilip Sarkar. Other sections include aircraft recognition, how to act as an RAF officer, bailing out etc.

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    Image of A FIGHTER PILOT'S CALL TO ARMS: Defending Britain and France Against the Luftwaffe, 1940-1942

    A FIGHTER PILOT'S CALL TO ARMS: Defending Britain and France Against the Luftwaffe, 1940-1942

    Stanislav Fejfar

    Stunned into action by the rapid collapse of his country in 1938, Czech pilot Stanislav Fejfar escaped and traveled through Poland to serve initially with the French Foreign Legion, then as a sous-lieutenant with the French air force in early 1940. After the demise of that country, he fled to England in July 1940 to join the RAF. Posted to 310 Squadron, he saw much feverish action and he rapidly became an ace during the Battle of Britain but was to lose his life on 17 May 1942, shot down over Boulogne flying his beloved Spitfire.

    Until recently it was not known that throughout his short career, Stanislav kept a full day-by-day diary which has been translated by Henry Prokop and is the basis for this book. Augmented by the diligent research of Norman Franks and Simon Muggleton in unearthing previously unpublished combat reports, letters and other articles of memorabilia, together with their annotated comments, this is an extremely valuable and moving account by a man who gave his life defending freedom. A book which will be sought out by anyone interested in the history of the Battle of Britain. 2010 is the 70th anniversary of that momentous event.

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    Image of DIEPPE: THE GREATEST AIR BATTLE

    DIEPPE: THE GREATEST AIR BATTLE

    Norman Franks

    When Canadian troops and British Commandos made their now famous 'reconnaissance in force' against the harbor town of Dieppe on 19th August 1942, they were supported and protected by the largest array of Royal Air Force aircraft ever seen in WWII until that time. Air Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory, AOC of Fighter Command's No.11 Group, was given command of the air operation and had 46 Spitfire, 8 Hurricane, 3 Typhoon and 4 Mustang Squadrons under his direction, as well as 7 Boston and Blenheim squadrons of 2 Group and Fighter Command. On 19th August Leigh-Mallory commanded more squadrons than were available to Air Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding at any one time during the Battle of Britain two years previously.This book provides a detailed, minute by minute, hour by hour, blow by blow account of operations on a day which has become accepted as the one on which the Royal Air Force fought its greatest air battle. The RAF flew nearly 3,000 sorties: the Luftwaffe 945, Air combat, ground attacks, bombing and smoke laying missions cost the RAF over 100 aircraft and the Luftwaffe nearly 50. All this happened in just 16 hours.In addition to the in-depth research into the RAF's activities on this August day 68 years ago, there are also many personal accounts from pilots who took part adding color to the story of this unique battle in the history of the Royal Air Force. Norman Franks is a full time author and air historian, with several books on WWI and WWII published by Grub Street.

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    Image of AIR WARS OVER MALTA: No Place for Beginners

    AIR WARS OVER MALTA: No Place for Beginners

    Tony O'Toole

    The second of the new and exciting series of publications 'Air Wars' concentrates on significant air campaigns throughout the history of Aviation. 'Air Wars over Malta' chronicles the air battles during the George Cross Island's siege from late 1940 to early 1944, with a well-documented and informative text, hundreds of historical photos and pages of full color illustrations, documenting the color schemes and markings of the aircraft taking part.

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    FEW, THE

    Dilip Sarkar

    GEORGE UNWIN, Battle of Britain fighter ace: 'Dilip knows more about me and the pilots with whom I flew during the Battle of Britain than we do! If anyone ever needs to know anything about the RAF during the summer of 1940, don't ask the Few, ask him!'

    PETER TOWNSEND, Battle of Britain fighter ace: 'Dilip Sarkar understands perfectly the mysteries of air tactics and strategy, enabling him to write authoritative, lively and deeply touching stories of those days when friend and foe met in the air'.

    The Battle of Britain started on 10 July 1940, ending 16 weeks later on 31 October 1940. The Luftwaffe's intention was to destroy Fighter Command, domination of the skies being crucial to Hitler's invasion plan. During that fateful summer, young RAF fighter pilots, flying Spitfires and Hurricanes, were scrambled time and time again to face insuperable odds - and the Luftwaffe was, until that point, unbeaten.

    Dilip Sarkar has been fascinated by the Battle of Britain since childhood and began seriously researching the subject in the 1970s. He wrote thousands of letters and traveled extensively over the UK interviewing the fabled 'Few'. Over the last 30 years he has interviewed more Battle of Britain survivors than any other author and his archive is a unique collection of veterans 'voices'. In this new book Dilip Sarkar chronicles the Battle of Britain from start to finish, drawing extensively from his interviews with pilots.

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    The Spitfire Story

    Alfred Price

    The Spitfire is probably the most famous Second World War fighter aircraft. Alfred Price, international authority on the Spitfire, traces the life of the aircraft that has become a living legend. From the original design concept of Reginald Mitchell to the first flight in 1936, and on through 12 years of continuous development, this extensively illustrated history of the Spitfire has benefited from the help of many people engaged in the design, production and testing of the Spitfire, in particular Jeffrey Quill, the former Chief Test Pilot for Supermarine.

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    Image of The Spitfire Pocket Manual: All Marks in Service 1939-1945 (Pocket Manuals (Conway))

    The Spitfire Pocket Manual: All Marks in Service 1939-1945

    The Supermarine Spitfire was the definitive Allied fighter of World War II and ranks amongst the most famous aircraft of all time. This handbook brings together the most useful manuals produced for the plane's pilots and ground crew and reproduces them as they originally appeared when issued to RAF and other Allied air forces. It includes engine specs, cockpit layout, pilot's notes, flying instructions, emergency procedures, and fighting tactics.

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    Image of SPITFIRE VOICES: Life as a Spitfire Pilot

    SPITFIRE VOICES: Life as a Spitfire Pilot

    Dilip Sarkar

    Over 100 historic photographs most previously unpublished from veterans own personal collections.

    The firsthand combat experiences of Spitfire pilots from throughout the Second World War and in all theaters.

    Spitfire Voices represents an important oral history of the Spitfire from the pilot's perspective. The stories of survivors are not simply regurgitated, however, but placed into historical context using contemporary documents - often featuring detailed investigative work, as in the reconstruction of Wing Commander Douglas Bader being brought down over France not by an enemy fighter but by one of his own Spitfire pilots.

    Deeply moving stories of those who made the ultimate sacrifice in Spitfires are also included, the author drawing upon their personal letters, diaries, contemporary documents and the memories of their families and comrades. The book therefore features a wide-ranging experience, from air combat to ground attack, deck-landings, crashes and bailouts, victories and defeats. Illustrated with photographs from the albums of the pilots concerned, thereby increasing the originality and atmosphere of this comprehensive work, Spitfire Voices represents exactly what is was like flying to war in a Spitfire - in the words of those who lived to tell their tales.

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    HOW THE SPITFIRE WON THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN

    Dilip Sarkar

    Historians have previously argued that it was the Hurricane not the Spitfire that won the Battle of Britain. Although the Spitfire won the hearts of the British population at large 'stealing' the limelight, it was the Hurricane that achieved most during the battle. Dilip Sarkar turns this now established view on its head.

    'Dilip Sarkar understands perfectly the mysteries of air tactics and strategy' PETER TOWNSEND, Battle of Britain fighter ace.

    Although there were many more Hawker Hurricanes than Supermarine Spitfires engaged in the epic conflict fought over southern England in summer 1940, the public's imagination was captured by the shapely and charismatic Spitfire. According to legend, however, the Hurricane executed far greater damage on the enemy than all other defenses combined, and was therefore the unsung hero of our 'Finest Hour'. New research, though, confirms that the Spitfire, although less in number, was in fact supreme, and destroyed an equal number of enemy machines to the more numerous Hurricane force.

    Featuring interviews with pilots who flew to war in both Spitfires and Hurricanes, and following a detailed analysis of combat reports and casualty records, Dilip Sarkar shatters the myth and argues a persuasive case proving that the Hurricane was markedly inferior to the Spitfire during the Battle of Britain - which could have been won by Spitfires, but not Hurricanes, alone. A controversial thesis likely to provoke lively debate, the evidence presented by this retired police detective and expert aviation historian is nonetheless indisputable.

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    Spit "Taxi" Revisited

    Volume 32, Issue 12, 2004, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Peter R Arnold

    A news feature by Peter R. Arnold on the temporary re-creation of a wartime two-seat Spitfire

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    The Last

    Volume 32, Issue 05, 2004, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Peter R Arnold

    Peter R. Arnold recounts his role in arranging a new paint scheme for a BBMF Spitfire

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    Hidden Things Revealed

    Volume 30, Issue 05, 2002, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Jimmy Taylor

    World War Two photo-reconnaissance Spitfire pilot Jimmy Taylor reassesses his squadron's contribution to Operation Market Garden

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    A Spitfire With Bite

    Volume 30, Issue 01, 2002, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Tony Harmsworth

    Tony Harmsworth recounts the story behind the eyecatching sharkmouth paint scheme on David Lowy's Spitfire VIII

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    The Other Side Of The Camera

    Volume 28, Issue 10, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Lettice Curtis

    Built for photo-reconnaissance, Spitfire Mk XI PL983 became a racer and a display aircraft, and now it has been put back in the air in Kent to mark the Battle of Britain anniversary, as former wartime ATA pilot Lettice Curtis — who raced it in 1948 — reports

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    Survival Of The Fittest

    Volume 28, Issue 10, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    David Baker

    Hurricane, Spitfire, Bf 109 - they all fought in the Battle of Britain, but which was the best? David Baker addresses the thorny question

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    Spitfire Update

    Volume 28, Issue 08, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    It's back in the air! Richard Paver presents his latest progress report on Martin Sargeant's effort to put Spitfire Mk XI PL983 back in the air in time for the Battle of Britain anniversary airshow season

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    Pretty In Pink!

    Volume 28, Issue 08, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Richard Paver explains what possessed the Real Aeroplane Company to repaint Spitfire PR.XI PL965 in all-over pink

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    Spitfire Update

    Volume 28, Issue 07, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Richard Paver's regular progress report on putting Spitfire PL983 back in the air in rime for the Battle anniversary

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    Spitfire Update No 3

    Volume 28, Issue 05, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Richard Paver's monthly progress report on the effort to put Spitfire Xf PL983 hack in the air for the Battle of Britain 60th anniversary

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    Spitfire Update No 2

    Volume 28, Issue 04, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Richard Paver's latest report from Kent on the project to put Spitfire XI PL983 back in the air in time for the Battle of Britain 60th anniversary

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    Spitfire Update — No 1

    Volume 28, Issue 03, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    The race is on to put loiinei Doug Arnold Spitfire XI PL983 back in the air for the Battle ol Britain 60th anniversary this summer — and Richard Paver is following progress step-by-step

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    Preservation Profile

    Volume 27, Issue 12, 1999, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Battle of Britain Memorial Flight Spitfire DCC MK356 comes under the spotlight this month

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    Baby Bea Is Back

    Volume 27, Issue 06, 1999, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Flying again after a run of bad luck, the Dutch Spitfire Flight's Mk IX performed a farewell salute to RAF Mansion. Report and exclusive pictures by Richard Paver

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    A New Toy In The Shops

    Volume 27, Issue 03, 1999, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Col Pope explains the recent appearance of an all-silver Spitfire XVI in a Rolls-Royce car showroom

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    5-Star Spitfire

    Volume 26, Issue 12, 1998, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Chris Woods

    It wasn't only reconnaisance Spitfires that were painted blue: exclusive air-to-air pictures of Chris Woods's newly-restored Mk XVI

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    Spy Spitfires Over China

    Volume 26, Issue 12, 1998, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Edward Powles

    Flt Lt Edward Powles AFC condudes his two-part recollections of flying unofficial reconnaissance flights over communist China in the early Fifties

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    A Servant Of Four Masters

    Volume 26, Issue 10, 1998, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Tom Neil

    Wing Commander Tom Neil dfc* afc ae makes a welcome return to Aeroplane with an account of a wartime Spitfire trip which went as wrong as it possibly could

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    Spitfire Heaven

    Volume 26, Issue 07, 1998, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Sixty years after Spitfires first entered RAF service at Duxford, the type returned en masse for a record-setting setting celebration airshow, reports Tony Harmsworth

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    Preservation Profile

    Volume 25, Issue 06, 1997, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight's Spitfire PR.XIX PM631 is this month's subject

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    Spirit Of Reutech

    Volume 25, Issue 02, 1997, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Dave Becker

    Dave Becker reports on the SAAF Museum's Spitfire IX, named after the firm which rescued the fighter's rebuild

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    Operation Snapdragon

    Volume 24, Issue 12, 1996, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    David Wootton

    In 1948 the RAF wanted to test the practicality of scrambling Spitfires from Singapore to Hong Kong - a mere 2,300 miles. David Wootton tells the story

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    Preservation Profile

    Volume 24, Issue 11, 1996, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Richard Paver recounts the history of David Pennell's Spitfire Mk IX MJ730/ G-HF1X

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    First Solo

    Volume 24, Issue 07, 1996, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Alec Lumsden

    Alee Lumsden tells what it was like for a "sprog" pilot, with less than 200 hours' total flying time, to fly a Spitfire for the first time in 1941

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    Preservation Profile

    Volume 24, Issue 06, 1996, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Richard Paver gives the This is your life treatment to the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight's Spitfire PR.XIX PS915

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    The Flyers

    Volume 24, Issue 03, 1996, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Of the world's total population of some 200 Spitfires, no fewer than 46 are air- worthy. Part One of our guide to air- worthy examples covers Marks I to XI

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    Spitfires On Screen

    Volume 24, Issue 03, 1996, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Melvyn Hiscock talks to Mark Hanna of the Duxford-based Old Flying Machine Company about the challenges of flying Spitfires for TV and film cameras

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    Spitfires Into The Next Millennium

    Volume 24, Issue 03, 1996, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    The start of our special coverage to mark the 60th anniversary of the Supermarine Spitfire

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    Prisoner And Escort

    Volume 24, Issue 02, 1996, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Photographs of a captured Focke-Wulf Fw 190 in formation with two Spitfires in 1944

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    Burmese Stars

    Volume 24, Issue 01, 1996, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    In an exclusive report for Aeroplaneto mark the start of the Supermarine Spitfire's 60th anniversary year, Peter Arnold investigates a hitherto unsuspected cache of six surviving examples in Rangoon

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    On The Lighter Side

    Volume 23, Issue 11, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Dopey Edwards

    In the second of three articles taking a light-hearted look at RAF flying during World War Two, "Dopey" Edwards flies scrounged examples of the Magister, Spitfire and Hurricane

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    Missing, believed killed

    Volume 23, Issue 05, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Roy Nesbit

    in April last year an aviation archaeologist who excavated a wartime Spitfire crash site was arrested. Roy Nesbit investigates

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    Spitfire anatomy

    Volume 23, Issue 03, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    SJ Paine

    S.J.Paine concludes his engineering history of the Supermarine Spitfire and Seafire with descriptions of the Spitfires XVIII, PR.XIX, 21, 22 and 24, and the Seafires XVII, 45 and 46/47

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    Spitfire anatomy

    Volume 23, Issue 02, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    SJ Paine

    S.J. Paine's engineering history of the Supermarine Spitfire and the Seafire continues with notes on the PR.X, the F Mk XIV, Seafire XV and the Spitfire XVI

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    Spitfire anatomy

    Volume 23, Issue 01, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    SJ Paine

    SJ Paine continues his engineering history of the Supermarine Spitfire and Seafire

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    Spitfire reborn

    Volume 21, Issue 12, 1993, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Clive Du Cros describes his ten-year project to build an all-wooden flying reproduction of Supermarine Spitfire prototype K5054

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    Preservation profile

    Volume 21, Issue 09, 1993, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Richard Paver recounts the history of recently-restored Spitfire LF.IX MK732/G-HVDM

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    Preservation profile

    Volume 21, Issue 06, 1993, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Richard Paver describes the history and restoration of Eddie Coventry's Spitfire LF.XVIE TD248

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    Spitfire notebook

    Volume 21, Issue 06, 1993, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    This month's notebook features the two-seat Spitfire Trainers which appeared after World War Two

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    Yesterday's Winds

    Volume 20, Issue 11, 1992, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Part 2 Former 81 Sqn Spitfire PR.XIX pilot Flt Lt E. C. Powles AFC RAF (Retd) concludes his account of an alarmingly eventful flight from Hong Kong to French Indo-China and back in 1951

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    Preservation profile

    Volume 20, Issue 10, 1992, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Rudy Frasca's recently-restored Spitfire FR Mk XVIII TP280 is this month's subject

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    Yesterday's Winds -- Part 1

    Volume 20, Issue 10, 1992, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Former 81 Sqn Spitfire PR.XIX pilot Fit Lt E. C. Powles AFC RAF (Retd) recalls an alarmingly eventful flight from Hong Kong to French Indo-China (now Vietnam) and back in 1951

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    Propellers -part 2

    Volume 20, Issue 08, 1992, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Don Middleton

    Don Mfddleton concfudes his history of the propeller, tracing Second World War developments and the post-war evolution of the turboprop

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    Spitfire notebook

    Volume 20, Issue 06, 1992, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    -part 19 of the series features the later variants of the Spitfire XIV

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    Battle of Britain

    Volume 19, Issue 11, 1991, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Denis Crowley-Milling

    fact and myth Former Battle of Britain pilot Air Marshal Sir Denis Crowley-Milling KCB CBE DSO DFC AE sheds new light on certain aspects of the conflict -particularly the doctrine of the "Big Wing", a tactic in which he took part

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    Preservation profile

    Volume 19, Issue 10, 1991, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    David Tallichet

    David Tallichet'sAudley End-based Spitfire LF XVIE RW382 gets the This is your life treatment

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    A Spitfire made for two

    Volume 19, Issue 04, 1991, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    The restoration of Spitfire two-seater PV202 to flying condition is described by Hugh Smaffwood

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    Spitfire notebook -part 8

    Volume 19, Issue 02, 1991, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    The Spitfire Mk V and some of its high-altitude exploits over the Western Desert Skywriters - Mr Herrick's convertiplanes During the 1930s, in a quest for a stall-and spin-proof aircraft. Gerard Herrick conceived a machine which could convert from fixed-wing to partial rotary-wing operation while airborne

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    Spitfire notebook- Part 7

    Volume 18, Issue 12, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    First published in The Aeroplane Spotter in 1946-47, the series covers the early PR Spitfires this month

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    Spitfire notebook -part 6

    Volume 18, Issue 10, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    First published in The Aeroplane Spotter in 1946-47, the series covers the Spitfire Mks III and IV this month

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    Spitfire notebook -part 4

    Volume 18, Issue 08, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    The one-off Supermarine Speed Spitfire, adapted from a Mk I air frame in 1937-38 for an attempt on the World Landplane Speed Record

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    Spitfire notebook -part 3

    Volume 18, Issue 07, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    First published in The Aeroplane Spotter during 1946-47, the notebook this month examines the Spitfire Mkl

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    Star of Ramat

    Volume 18, Issue 05, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    David Peter Arnold

    David Peter Arnold reports on the recent "rediscovery" and restoration of an elusive Spitfire in Israel

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    From Malta with bombs -part 1

    Volume 16, Issue 09, 1988, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    LHF O'Neill

    Gp Capt L H. F. O'Neill DFC begins a two-part account of flying Spitfires on dive-bombing missions from Malta in 1943

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    Spitfires at home

    Volume 16, Issue 09, 1988, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    JM Ramsden

    J. M. Ramsden reports j from the Spitfire Anniversary Air Display held at Duxford on July 10

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    R. J. Mitchell: my father -part 2

    Volume 14, Issue 04, 1986, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Gordon Mitchell

    Dr Gordon Mitchell, son of Spitfire designer Reginald J. Mitchell, concludes a two-part biography of his father based on his book, R. J. Mitchell, published earlier this month

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    R. J. Mitchell: my father -part 1

    Volume 14, Issue 03, 1986, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Gordon Mitchell

    Dr Gordon Mitchell, son of Spitfire designer Reginald J. Mitchell, begins a two-part biography of his father based on his forth- coming book, R. J. Mitchell, due to be published on March 3

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    Probe Probare No 22: Supermarine Spitfire

    Volume 14, Issue 03, 1986, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Alec Lumsden , Terry Heffernan

    To mark the 50th anniversary of the first flight of the prototype Spitfire, which took place on March 5, 1936, Alec Lumsden and Terry Heffernan examine the A&AEE reports on the handling of K5054

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    Eyes in the sky -part 4

    Volume 13, Issue 09, 1985, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Roy Nesbit

    In Part Four of the series, Roy Nesbit describes the work of PRU Spitfires sent to North Russia in 1942-44. Their job was to safeguard Murmansk-bound Allied convoys by reporting German battleship movements in the Northern Norwegian fjords

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    Personal Album

    Volume 13, Issue 05, 1985, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Two pages of post-war RAF Spitfires from the album of Mr P. Clifton

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    It came to pieces in my hands

    Volume 13, Issue 01, 1985, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Denis Sweeting

    On September 10. 1942, 167 Squadron pilot Denis Sweeting took off from RAF Castleton in his Spitfire VB on a routine early morning scramble-a flight that was to have a far-reaching consequence for the young pilot

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    Preservation Profile

    Volume 12, Issue 05, 1984, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Spitfire LF Mk VIII. MT719, rescued from India by the Haydon-Baillies in 1977 and now based at Caselle in Italy, is this month's subject

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    The deafening silence: Part 2

    Volume 12, Issue 03, 1984, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Alex Henshaw

    Alex Henshaw concludes his two-part story of the series of mystifying Spitfire engine failures which he and his team experienced at Castle Bromwich during 1942

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    The deafening silence -part 1

    Volume 12, Issue 02, 1984, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Alex Henshaw

    Alex Henshaw opens a two-part article on the series of mystifying Spitfire engine failures which he and his team of test pilots experienced at Castle Bromwich during 1942

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    Preservation Profile: G-FIRE

    Volume 11, Issue 09, 1983, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Peter Arnold

    Spencer Flack's all-red Spitfire Mk XIVe, G-FIRE, is this month's subject; Peter Arnold has done the sleuthing

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    Shuttleworth's Spitfire P.R.Mk XI

    Volume 11, Issue 04, 1983, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    The Shuttleworth Trust has just put its Spitfire P.R.Mk XI Spitfire up for auction. Lettice Curtis, who once knew this aircraft well, recalls its history and describes the restoration work so far carried out by a group of volunteers at Duxford

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    Italian Spit

    Volume 11, Issue 03, 1983, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Brief history of Spitfire L.F. Mk. VIII I-SPIT/MT719 recently restored to airworthy condition in Italy

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    Saga of the unwanted Spitfire

    Volume 10, Issue 08, 1982, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    TF Neil

    Wg Cdr T. F. Neil recalls how he managed to acquire a Spitfire for personal use in 1944 and why he came to regret it

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    Spits in civvies

    Volume 10, Issue 07, 1982, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    After World War Two a few Spitfires were converted for civilian use. We look at some of those which shed their warpaint

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    Rare colour archive - Supermarine Spitfire F.21

    Volume 43, Issue 10, 2010, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Rare colour archive
    Another superb colour photograph unearthed from the Aeroplane archives; a Supermarine Spitfire F.21 - Serial number LA195

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    Merlins over Malta

    Volume 38 Issue 12, 2005, Aircraft illustrated

    Mark Ashley

    The spectacular and poignant return of a Spitfire and Hurricane to Malta - including air-to-airs

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    The power and the glory

    Volume 33 Issue 11, 2000, Aircraft illustrated

    What is it like to tly the Spitfire? Strap-in and find out! Free pull-out Poster

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    Driving a Rolls

    Volume 32 Issue 11, 1999, Aircraft illustrated

    John M Dibbs

    The best job in the world? Rolls-Royce pilot Andy Sephton provides a pilot's eye view of flying the Spitfire. Air-to-air photography by John Dibbs, The Plane Picture Co

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    Spitfire's sixtieth

    Volume 29 Issue 05, 1996, Aircraft illustrated

    Denis J Calvert

    The Spitfire celebrated its 60th birthday on 5 March. To celebrate the occasion, and its status as the birthplace of the legendary aircraft, the City of Southampton held a special programme of events. Denis J. Calvert was there *

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    Tim Wallis in Spitfire crash

    Volume 29 Issue 03, 1996, Aircraft illustrated

    Peter Marsh

    Warbird pilot Sir Tim Wallis was seriously injured in a Spitfire crash on New Year's Day. Peter Marsh provides the background

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    Exclusive: 'Historic' Spitfires

    Volume 26 Issue 04, 1993, Aircraft illustrated

    John M Dibbs

    Top warbird photographer John Dibbs provides stunning and exclusive air-to-air images of the Spitfires restored by Historic Flying Ltd

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    Return to Flight - A tribute to a Kiwi ace

    Volume 16, Issue 2, April 2009, Classic Wings Magazine

    The Spitfire Mk.IX was described by many of its pilots as the best of the breed and many of the RAF

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    Desert Delight

    Volume 15, Issue 3, June 2008, Classic Wings Magazine

    After a major delay in exiting the United States, Spitfire Tr.IX

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    Superlative Spitfire!

    Volume 14, Issue 4, August 2007, Classic Wings Magazine

    Precision AerospaceThere is no question that for many aviation enthusiasts around the world, there is no flying machine more appealing, more glamorous, more admired, than R J Mitchell's beautiful Spitfire. The elegant lines, elliptical wings and legendary flying characteristics, the whole story of how this machine inspired a nation as it helped to turn the tide of the unstoppable Nazi juggernaught during the Battle of Britain. For the past 20 years, an aviation gem has been undergoing a long and complex rebuild. Now restored to fully operational status, Spitfire Mk Vb, Bl628 is poised once again to thrill onlookers, and as a prelude we take a look at the mountain of work that has seen this accomplished, accompanied by some stunning air to air photos.

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    Spitfires For Everyone

    Volume 11, Issue 2, March 2004, Classic Wings Magazine

    Most of us cannot afford to own and fly a full size WW2 fighter aircraft, not only because of their rarity, but the huge costs involved. This article looks at an option to get up close and personal with one of these fabulous aircraft. We take a close look at the efforts of those who have worked to produce full size, realistic, V-12 powered Spitfire recreations which offer everyone the chance to own and fly one of these machines for less than the price of a new Cessna. This option will open the door to more people excited about being involved with WW2 aviation and we are sure to see an increasing number of these colourful machines at flying events in the near future.

    Under the spotlight are the Clive Du Cros' replica, Marcel Jurca MJ-100, the SAC Spitfire, and the 'Plans Delivery Spitfires'

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    ANZAC Spitfire Pilots

    Volume 4, Issue 4, October 1997, Classic Wings Magazine

    Classic Wings Downunder deals with Classic aircraft in our part of the world, so it's a great pleasure to publish these exerts from Ventura Publications new book about the pilots who flew and fought in the Second World War.

    The second book in Ventura's Classic Warbird Series "Spitfire-the ANZAC's" is based around the service careers of eight Australian and New Zealand pilots who served on Spitfires in WWII.

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    Spitfire Downunder

    Volume 4, Issue 3, July 1997, Classic Wings Magazine

    Perhaps as many as 700 Spitfires served in this region during the Second World War.

    Few remain. Even fewer are in flying condition.

    We take a look at the survivors, the projects, and the future prospects for the Spitfire Downunder.

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    Aircraft Profile 41 - Supermarine Spitfire I & II

    Philip JR Moyes

    "The Spitfire was a fighter par excellence. It was a thoroughbred through and through, combining as it did sheer perfection of line with handling qualities that were second to none. It was a fighter pilot's dream plane—fast, deadly and docile.The Spitfire obtained its first battle successes against the sporadic tip-and-run raiders in the "phoney" war, but the supreme trial of the "Spit." came during the Battle of Britain. Then it was that, alongside the more numerous Hurricanes, the Spitfire Is and Its won imperishable fame by smashing the awesome controlling formations of Luftwaffe bombers and their fighter escorts until the onslaught faltered and ceased.As the war progressed the Spitfire was continually modified and improved, and although the story of this development is outside the scope of this Profile, a few facts should, perhaps, be put on record. Most important of these are that the Spitfire remained a front-line fighter throughout the whole period of the war..."

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    Aircraft Profile 206 - Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IX

    Profile Publications Peter Moss

    JUST as the Vickers-Armstrong Supermarine Type 349 Spitfire Mark V (see Profile No. 166) was evolved as a "stop-gap" for the Mk. III, so too did the Mk. IX serve the same purpose for the Mk. VIII.
    It was on September 27, 1941, that Royal Air Force pilots reported the presence of a new radial-engine fighter during a daylight sweep over German-occupied Northern France. The superior speed and ceiling of this new Luftwaffe fighter, known to be the Focke-Wulf FW 190A-1, made it an urgent priority for the British to produce quickly and in quantity a fighter equal to this new threat.
    To meet this requirement, the Spitfire Mk. VIII was evolved from the Mk. VII. But as this variant was a complete redesign, production re-tooling would take time to accomplish. This factor was appreciated by the Air Staff planners and a decision was arrived at with urgency.

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    Aircraft Profile 166 - Supermarine Spitfire V Series

    Profile Publications Ted Hooton

    With the exception of the first two variants of the Spitfire (the Marks I and II, described in Profile No. 41), it is a remarkable fact that the most used and, generally, the most successful variants of this fighter were those originally developed as "stop gap" types. During World War II it was not always possible to allow time for development and pro¬duction of the best aircraft, and under the pressure of combat conditions, short-cuts were inevitable. Such was the case with the Spitfire Mk. V.
    During the Battle of Britain in 1940 the Spitfire I had barely maintained superiority over the German Messerschmitt Bf 109E, and the few Spitfire II's that took part had but a small increase in performance over the Mk. I. Therefore, in October 1940, the Air Staff of the Royal Air Force turned to the question of a replacement aircraft. The intended successor to the earlier Marks was the Mk. III, which had been under development since 1939, and had already flown. This aircraft had a...

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    SPITFIRES WITH SEA-BOOTS

    Volume 15, Issue 4, 1978, Air International

    Eric Brown

    apt Eric Brown concludes his two-part account, in our "Viewed from the Cockpit" series, of the evolution and operation of the Seafire. This instalment covers the introduction of the folding-wing Seafire III and describes the Griffon-engined variants.

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