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North American P-51 Mustang references, articles and publications

Mustangs Of The Silver Screen

Number 232, November 2000, Flypast magazine

The North American P-51 Mustang's career in movies from a mainly US viewpoint

Their Names Liveth For Everyone

Volume 27, Issue 8, 1991, Air Classics

Unraveling the mystery of two American Mustang pilots shot down over Czechoslovakia in 1945

Top Ace Of The Checkertail Clan

Volume 28, Issue 6, 1992, Air Classics

An examination of the World War Two combat history of Major Herschel H. Green

What's In A Name?

Volume 30, Issue 12, 1994, Air Classics

How photo recon Mustangs and Lightnings in the Ninth Air Force received their nicknames and nose art during World War Two..

Dogfight With A 262

Volume 28, Issue 1, 1992, Air Classics

While American Mustang pilot Lt. John Kirk knew his chances of catching the enemy jet weren't good, he was never one to pass up an opportunity

Photo Recon Mustang

Volume 30, Issue 5, 1994, Air Classics

Butch Schroeder's Award-Winning Mustang is a particularly rare variant..

Image of The Fight in the Clouds: The Extraordinary Combat Experience of P-51 Mustang Pilots During World War II

The Fight in the Clouds: The Extraordinary Combat Experience of P-51 Mustang Pilots During World War II

James P Busha

This is as close as you’ll get to a World War II–era P-51 Mustang without flying one yourself.
 
The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang first started appearing in real numbers in 1943, at the climax of the Allied campaign in World War II. Able to fly long ranges, it was the perfect escort, keeping bombers protected all the way from Allied bases in Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Pacific to a variety of Axis industrial targets and military installations and back. The Mustang would go on to provide pivotal air support on D-Day, and by the end of the war, the P-51 would be responsible for nearly half of all enemy aircraft shot down. In The Fight in the Clouds, aviation writer and EAA Warbirds of America editor James P. Busha narrates a spellbinding collection of tales of P-51 Mustang combat throughout the war. Drawing on interviews conducted with dozens of veteran P-51 pilots, the book traces the progress of war through the exciting, chronologically organized experiences of the men who actually flew the planes into war. You'll encounter Mustangs tangling with Soviet-built Yaks, a Mustang ace shooting down an Me 262 Stormbird, an epic long-range battle over the Pacific Ocean, and a score of other riveting accounts underscoring the P-51's versatility and its vital importance to the Allied victory. Bolstered by Busha's own commentary and historical analysis, along with a gallery of rare black-and-white period photographs, The Fight in the Clouds offers a cockpit-seat view of one of WWII's most celebrated aircraft and the men who bravely flew it into harm's way.

Image of The Fight in the Clouds: The Extraordinary Combat Experience of P-51 Mustang Pilots During World War II

The Fight in the Clouds: The Extraordinary Combat Experience of P-51 Mustang Pilots During World War II

James P Busha

This is as close as you'll get to a World War II - era P-51 Mustang without flying one yourself. The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang first started appearing in real numbers in 1943, at the climax of the Allied campaign in World War II. Able to fly long ranges, it was the perfect escort, keeping bombers protected all the way from Allied bases in Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Pacific to a variety of Axis industrial targets and military installations and back. The Mustang would go on to provide pivotal air support on D-Day, and by the end of the war, the P-51 would be responsible for nearly half of all enemy aircraft shot down. In The Fight in the Clouds, aviation writer and EAA Warbirds of America editor James P. Busha narrates a spellbinding collection of tales of P-51 Mustang combat throughout the war. Drawing on interviews conducted with dozens of veteran P-51 pilots, the book traces the progress of war through the exciting, chronologically organized experiences of the men who actually flew the planes into war. You'll encounter Mustangs tangling with Soviet-built Yaks, a Mustang ace shooting down an Me 262 Stormbird, an epic long-range battle over the Pacific Ocean, and a score of other riveting accounts underscoring the P-51's versatility and its vital importance to the Allied victory. Bolstered by Busha's own commentary and historical analysis, along with a gallery of rare black-and-white period photographs, The Fight in the Cloudsoffers a cockpit-seat view of one of WWII's most celebrated aircraft and the men who bravely flew it into harm's way.

Image of Fighting Hitler's Jets: The Extraordinary Story of the American Airmen Who Beat the Luftwaffe and Defeated Nazi Germany

Fighting Hitler's Jets: The Extraordinary Story of the American Airmen Who Beat the Luftwaffe and Defeated Nazi Germany

<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Robert-F.-Dorr/e/B001H6KXT4/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1">Robert F. Dorr</a>

Fighting Hitler's Jets brings together in a single, character-driven narrative two groups of men at war: on one side, American fighter pilots and others who battled the secret “wonder weapons” with which Adolf Hitler hoped to turn the tide; on the other, the German scientists, engineers, and pilots who created and used these machines of war on the cutting edge of technology. Written by Robert F. Dorr, renowned author of Zenith Press titles Hell Hawks!, Mission to Berlin, and Mission to Tokyo, the story begins with a display of high-tech secret weapons arranged for Hitler at a time when Germany still had prospects of winning the war. It concludes with Berlin in rubble and the Allies seeking German technology in order to jumpstart their own jet-powered aviation programs. Along the way, Dorr expertly describes the battles in the sky over the Third Reich that made it possible for the Allies to mount the D-Day invasion and advance toward Berlin. Finally, the book addresses both facts and speculation about German weaponry and leaders, including conspiracy theorists’ view that Hitler escaped in a secret aircraft at the war’s end. Where history and controversy collide with riveting narrative, Fighting Hitler’s Jets furthers a repertoire that comprises some of the United States’ most exceptional military writing.

Image of Building the North American P-51D Mustang (Airframe Constructor)

Building the North American P-51D Mustang (Airframe Constructor)

Daniel Zamarbide

A Detailed Guide to Building the Zoukei-Mura 1/32 Kit. 64 pages. Covers construction and finishing from start to finish including detailing, painting and weathering; detailed description of boxed kit, preparation and overview, walk-around images of the real aircraft, including diagrams from the Flight Manual; 5 pages of color profiles by Richard J. Caruana; In-depth bare metal 'how-to' guide; additional references and available decal sheets; additional detail and upgrade parts produced by Zoukei-Mura for their Mustang kit.

Image of Aces of the 78th Fighter Group (Aircraft of the Aces)

Aces of the 78th Fighter Group (Aircraft of the Aces)

Thomas Cleaver

Eighth Air Force 78th FG flew P-38 Lightning, P-47 Thunderbolt, and P-51 Mustang fighters in air combat against German Luftwaffe Me-109, Fw-190, and Me-262 aircraft.

The 78th FG was originally established as the fourth of the P-38 fighter groups that were expected to perform fighter escort in the newly formed Eighth Air Force. Arriving in England in November 1942, the group lost most of its personnel and all of its aircraft as attrition replacements to units in the North African theatre in February 1943. Left with no flying personnel other than flight leaders, and no aircraft, the group was re-equipped with the P-47 Thunderbolt and newly trained P-47 pilots in March 1943. The 78th flew its first sweep along the Dutch coast in April in company with the 4th FG. Along with the 56th FG, these groups would be the first units in VIII Fighter Command, and as such "wrote the book" on long range fighter escort in the ETO. The 78th FG would ultimately prove to be the only Eighth Air Force fighter group to have flown the P-38 Lightning, P-47 Thunderbolt, and P-51 Mustang in its operational career. Flying from Duxford, in Cambridgeshire, the group's pilots shot down 316 enemy aircraft in air combat, with a further 144 claimed as probables or damaged. Once turned loose in 1944 to attack German airfields, the 78th was also credited with the destruction of 320 aircraft by strafing. The story of the 78th FG will be researched through extensive first-person interviews with eight surviving pilots and ground personnel of the unit, and also using previously recorded interviews with two leading ace pilots who are no longer alive. Photos will be gathered from surviving group members where possible, with emphasis on never-before-published imagery, in addition to other photos from historical collections.

Image of Spitfires & Yellow Tail Mustangs: The U.S. 52nd Fighter Group in WWII (Stackpole Military History Series)

Spitfires & Yellow Tail Mustangs: The U.S. 52nd Fighter Group in WWII (Stackpole Military History Series)

Tom Ivie

  • Story of one of the best fighter units in the Mediterranean theater, which earned two Distinguished Unit Citations and produced 21 aces
  • Vivid episodes of aerial combat during the key campaigns for Tunisia, Sicily, Italy, and more
  • Nicknamed "Yellow Tails" for the color markings on their aircraft
  • The unit flew British Spitfires before switching to P-51 Mustangs
  • Includes rare photos and color artwork

  • Image of P-51 Mustang Nose Art Gallery

    P-51 Mustang Nose Art Gallery

    John M Campbell

    Book by Campbell, John M., Campbell, Donna

    1/05/1994

    Image of Battle Colors Vol.5: Pacific Theater of Operations: Insignia and Aircraft Markings of the U.S. Army Air Forces in World War II

    Battle Colors Vol.5: Pacific Theater of Operations: Insignia and Aircraft Markings of the U.S. Army Air Forces in World War II

    Robert Watkins

    Volume five of the Battle Colors series shifts to the Pacific Theater of Operations with a focus on the Fifth, Seventh, Eleventh and Thirteenth U.S. Army Air Forces. As with previous volumes the primary emphasis of this work is group/squadron emblems in addition to combat aircraft tactical markings.

    Image of American Eagles, Vol. 4: P-51 Mustang Units of the Eigth Air Force

    American Eagles, Vol. 4: P-51 Mustang Units of the Eigth Air Force

    Roger Freeman

    Of the primary fighter types used by the USA in the European Theatre of Operations in World War II, the P-51 Mustang became the principle escort for heavy bombers. There were over 1,700 in service by the end of hostilities, the majority with the 14 fighter groups of the Eighth Air Force, and it is the decor of these units' Mustangs with which this book is primarily concerned. Roger Freeman provides not only a valuable reference source for artists and modelers, but also aids the identification of aircraft in photographs. The photographs reproduced in this study have for the most part been selected to show particular markings in detail, and in the case of the P-51 Mustang, the variety of schemes is considerable. The book also reproduces a selection of combat reports from leading Mustang pilots.

    Image of Aces At War: The American Aces Speak

    Aces At War: The American Aces Speak

    Eric Hammel

    ACES AT WAR
    The American Aces Speak
    by
    Eric Hammel


    Adding to the first three volumes of his acclaimed series, The American Aces Speak, leading combat historian Eric Hammel comes through with yet another engrossing collection of thirty-eight first-person accounts by American fighter aces serving in World War II, the Israeli War of Independence, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War

    Aces At War is a highly charged excursion into life and death in the air, told by men who excelled at piston-engine and jet-engine aerial combat and lived to tell about it. It is an emotional rendering of what brave airmen felt and how they fought in the now-dim days of America’s living national history.

    Ride with Flying Tigers ace Charlie Bond as he is shot down in flames over the Chinese city he alone has been able to defend against Japanese bombers. Share the loneliness of command as Lieutenant Commander Tom Blackburn decides the fate of the fellow Navy pilot whose F4U Corsair malfunctions in a desperate battle over Rabaul. Feel 2d Lieutenant Deacon Priest’s overwhelming sense of duty to a friend as he lands his P-51 Mustang behind German lines to rescue his downed squadron commander. Share Lieutenant Colonel Ed Heller’s desperation as he fights his way out of his uncontrollable F-86 Sabre jet over the wrong side of the Yalu River. And join Major Jim Kasler as he leads what might be the most important air strike of the Vietnam War.

    These are America’s eagles, and the stories they tell are their own, in their very own words.

    The Legend Of Y-29

    Volume 23, Issue 8, 1987, Air Classics

    Recalling a huge aerial battle between the best of the Luftwaffe and a squadron of American Thunderbolts and Mustangs

    Stiletto's Story

    Volume 22, Issue 3, 1986, Air Classics

    What really happened to Stiletto during the 1985 Reno Air Races?

    Unknown' North Americans: North American Fighter and Trainer Projects

    Volume 101, September 2002, Air Enthusiast

    Jared Zichek

    As one of the most popular subjects in the literature of aviation history, it seems every aspect of the developmental history of the North American P-51 Mustang has already been covered, often many times over. Fortunately, the wellspring of primary source material on this thoroughbred aircraft isn't entirely dry, and occasionally some interesting scraps of information surface regarding unusual projected derivatives that never left the drawing board.

    Reno for Gearheads: Tweaking Fighters for Racing

    Volume 99, May 2002, Air Enthusiast

    Graham White

    Watching the incredible racers hurtle around the circuit at Reno, Nevada, few people give regard for the incredible engineering - as well as flying - that makes for success. Those looking for a 'usual' Reno report had best avert your gaze now. This concentrates on the unique go-faster features and state-of-the-art engineering that makes Unlimited class air racing the world's fastest motor sport.
    I wish I could also give race results. Alas, owing to the despotic acts of terrorists on September 11, 2001, no races occurred - therefore, no race results. Twenty-nine Unlimiteds had entered for 2001, ranging from balls-to-the-wall, out-and-out racers to 'stock' warbirds.

    Magnificent Mustang: A Production History of the North American P-51

    Volume 95, September 2001, Air Enthusiast

    Kenneth Wixey

    Dictionaries refer to the Mustang as a feralised horse of the American prairies, the small, hardy, half-wild horse of America, or a wild horse of Mexico and California. A rather appropriate description when applied to the North American Aviation NA-73 single-seat fighter, which after emerging from that company's Inglewood, California, works, became quite a wild Pegasus (a mythical winged horse) indeed.

    Meteors v MiGs

    Volume 7 Issue 03, 1974, Aircraft illustrated

    WHEN the Pacific War ended on " August 15, 1945, 77 (Fighter) Squadron, RAAF, was operating from Labuan with its Curtiss Kittyhawks (code letters "AM"), and was assigned to Japan for duty as part of the British Commonwealth Occupation Force. During the next month, the squadron was re-equipped with fast, efficient new CA17 Mustangs, and after several delays finally arrived at Iwakuni on February 21, 1946, to carry out normal training and surveillance patrols in southern Japan.

    Nos 76 and 82 Squadrons, RAAF, also in Japan, were withdrawn to Australia in 1949 so that when the North Korean Army crossed the 38th Parallel into South Korea on June 25, 1950, No 77, at Iwakuni, was the only RAAF fighter unit still serving in Japan.
    UN help was immediately offered to South Korea, and four days after the invasion, No 77 was placed under the command of the US 5th Air Force and ordered to prepare for action at once, upon which the Mustangs were fitted with long-range fuel tanks,...

    Image of P-51 Mustang: From 1940 to 1980 (Planes and Pilots)

    P-51 Mustang: From 1940 to 1980 (Planes and Pilots)

    Andre Jouineau

    This new addition to the Planes and Pilots series from Histoire and Collections has 82 pages packed with full color graphic representations of this great World War II fighter. As with earlier books in the series the emphasis is on the wide range of markings and the many variants of this aircraft. An essential book for modelers and aviation enthusiasts.

    Also includes detail of personalized markings and nose art.

    Image of George Preddy, Top Mustang Ace

    George Preddy, Top Mustang Ace

    Samuel L Sox

    This is a biography of Major George E. Preddy, Jr. who became the leading active ace in the European Theater of Operations during World War II. When he was killed on Christmas Day 1944 by Allied ground fire, he was the top P-51 Mustang ace of all time, with 27 aerial and five ground victories. George's younger brother, Bill, was killed on April 17, 1945 while strafing an enemy aerodrome near Prague. A chapter is devoted to his short career in which he claimed two aerial victories.

    Image of North American P-51 Mustang Portfolio (Aircraft Portfolio)

    North American P-51 Mustang

    Aircraft Portfolio's RM Clarke

    A seldom seen Fine softcover, its contents are tight, bright and clean, free of any internal markings or personalizations. Now in a protective sealed plastic bag.

    Image of To Fly and Fight: Memoirs Of A Triple Ace (Warcraft)

    To Fly and Fight: Memoirs Of A Triple Ace (Warcraft)

    Clarence E , Clarence E Anderson

    Touching, thoughtful, and dead honest, To Fly and Fight is the story of a boy who grew up living his dream. During World War II Anderson flew with Chuck Yeager in the famed 357th Squadron where he became a triple ace by shooting out of the sky fifteen enemy planes. Following World War II, Anderson became a test pilot and later commanded jet fighter squadrons in South Korea and Okinawa. Then, in 1970, at an age when most pilots have long-since retired, Anderson flew combat strikes over Vietnam.

    Powder puff pilots -part 2

    Volume 18, Issue 04, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Joy Frazer

    In the concluding half of Joy Frazer's feature on the history of women military pilots, Joy Frazer examines female flying achievements in the jet age

    'Red Tail' Project

    Number 248, March 2002, Flypast magazine

    We highlight the CAF's newly restored P-51C 'Tuskegee Airmen', with a photographic portfolio..

    Tunes Of Glory

    Number 71, June 1987, Flypast magazine

    Michael Irvin

    We examine the outstanding career of Pierce McKennon of the 4th Fighter Group

    Legend of a piano playing flying ace

    TacR Specialists

    Number 179, June 1996, Flypast magazine

    From first operations with Lysanders as part of the British Expeditionary Force to the final attacks on V-Weapons sites, 26 Squadron specialised in the Tactical Reconnaissance role

    RAF in Luftwaffe colours

    Number 179, June 1996, Flypast magazine

    Cynrik De Decker , Jean-Louis Roba

    Throughout World War Two, RAF aircraft fell into German hands - and were put to good use nu their new 'owners'; Jean-Louis Roba and Cynrik De Decker investigate this little known part of the air power story

    Image of New Heavens: My Life as a Fighter Pilot and a Founder of the Israel Air Force (Aviation Classics)

    New Heavens: My Life as a Fighter Pilot and a Founder of the Israel Air Force (Aviation Classics)

    Boris Senior

    Although Boris Senior may not be well known outside Israel, he played an important, even vital, part in the formation of the Israel Air Force (IAF) and in the 1948 War of Independence. Those who are familiar with his efforts and dedication have an abiding respect and appreciation for this transplanted South African who nearly died when shot down on a mission in 1945 for the Royal Air Force.

    Leaving the RAF after World War II, Senior dedicated himself to the formation of the state of Israel by joining the Irgun to fight British control of Palestine. Originally undertaking surreptitious operations to undermine the governing authority in Palestine, the onset of the 1948 War of Independence had him back in combat, this time against Israel’s Arab neighbors. He flew combat sorties in such widely differing aircraft as the Spitfire and, of all things, a Beechcraft Bonanza, a general-aviation type. Senior used his own money to buy supplies and aircraft, personally under-taking multiple dangerous missions to fly new acquisitions to Israel. His tireless work to form an air defense system for the newly formed State of Israel laid the groundwork for the modern-day Israel Air Force.

    Through all his experiences, Senior has maintained an abiding understanding of the overall situation that still bedevils the Middle East, particularly Israel and its neighbors. Now, as a senior citizen, his fondest wish is to see the resolution of the age-old problems that result in so many Israelis and Arabs dying in attacks and counterattacks, more than fifty years after he helped launch the IAF.

    Fire bombs

    Volume 4 Issue 05, 1971, Aircraft illustrated

    James D Oughton

    A brief account of the napalm bomb

    DURING fighter and fighter-bomber operations over North-West Europe in the period around the Overlord invasion, there was a build-up of reports from pilots and others of jettisoned drop-tanks bursting into flames when striking the ground. Fire had long been accepted as a major anti- personnel weapon, and, to determine the possibility of using the standard drop-tanks filled with a highly inflammable substance as a ground attack weapon, tests were put in hand with full and partially-filled tanks using various grades of fuel oil. The results were inconclusive primarily because the liquid gave a flash fire of limited duration and dispersion area. Further investigations were begun into the possibility of developing a more suitable inflammable filling.

    While this investigation was proceeding, a series of trials using Mustang and Typhoon aircraft-was initiated within the Royal Air Force ; the trials were designed to evaluate feasibility and...

    Don Gentile

    Volume 4 Issue 05, 1971, Aircraft illustrated

    Harry Holmes

    HARRY HOLMES tells the story of the American World War II fighter ace

    "TO the Pilots of the 4th Fighter Group, US 8th Air Force at Debden. Essex. Don Gentile fully deserved the nickname "Gentle" , for on the ground he was a shy, quiet and slightly nervous type. However, as soon as he stepped into a cockpit he lost all of his insecurities and became extremely self-confident, with wonderful skill, judgement and reflexes-all of the many talents which go into the making of a superb fighter pilot.

    This young pilot, Don Salvatore Gentile, was born on
    December 6, 1920. to Italian parents in Piqua, Ohio. His interest in aviation developed at an early age and much of his leisure time was spent at the local airport. By the time he was 17 Gentile had flown solo and was working as a waiter in order to save enough money to buy his own aero plane . After losing $300 in a second-band aircraft deal, Gentile's father bought him an Arrow Sport biplane
    and the teenager's...

    Image of On-target Profile: RAF & Commonwealth Mustang's: No. 2 (On Target Profile 2)

    RAF & Commonwealth Mustang's: No. 2 (On Target Profile 2)

    On Target Profiles Jon Freeman

    Designed with the modeller in mind, with full-colour profile illustrations throughout accompanied by several pages offering profile and plan artwork. Extended captions accompany each illustration or set of illustrations. In RAF and Commonwealth service. There are not many fighters which achieve a legendary status in history but the P-51 Mustang is certainly one of the few exceptions. As the American-built equivalent to the Spitfire the Mustang was employed by a multitude of different air arms including, among others, the RAF, RCAF, RAAF, RNZAF, SAAF and the USAF. On Target Profile 2 concentrates purely on the machines operated by the Commonwealth nations. A large percentage of these did of course belong to the Royal Air Force and as such many of the profiles focus on machines operated by the United Kingdom. Some of the most interesting schemes worn by Canadian, Australian and South African aircraft are also included among others and the combination of all these makes for a...

    US Aircraft in the British Services 1914-55

    Volume 19, Issue 02, 1957, Air Pictorial

    Bruce Robertson

    THIS instalment continues the type-by-type record of the aircraft supplied to Britain under the lease-lend programme. The types are described in the approximate order in which they were first made the subject of lease-lend transactions.

    Your Questions Answered

    Volume 39, Issue 02, 1977, Air Pictorial

    JJ Halley , Norman L Avery

    Q: I believe that the Mustang was tested aboard an aircraftcarrier. Please provide Details.-D. Benfield, Stamiord, Lincs.

    Q: Would you please publish a history of No. 107 Squadron ?- John Reaper, Torry, Aberdeen

    Image of Aces of the Mighty Eighth (General Aviation)

    Aces of the Mighty Eighth

    Jeremy C Scutts , John C Stanaway

    The three most distinguished and best known US fighter aircraft of World War II were undoubtedly the P-38, the P-51 and the P-47. This title assesses the relative strengths and weaknesses of each legendary aircraft, and uncovers the personalities and achievements of their greatest "ace" pilots. The daylight raids on the Third Reich, when the P-51 pilots went head to head with the cream of the Luftwaffe; the less-celebrated yet equally outstanding exploits of the P-38 over Germany's heartland and the evolving combat tactics that enabled the heavy P-47 to hold its own against more nimble German opponents are all detailed in this volume.

    THE ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE

    Volume 47, Issue 2, 1994, Air International

    Matthew Wright

    Conceived in 1921, the Royal Australian Air Force is responsible for protecting an area of over 7,000,000km2
    and a population of some 17 million. Matthew Wright reviews the current structure and aircraft, and outlines its history.

    "ESTABLISHED on March 31. 1921. the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is one of the oldest air forces in the world. and today has an establishment numbering 24,142 personnel and more than 150 aircraft. From a widespread network of bases, the force provides air defence for the Australian sub-continent which. with its immense coastline and huge desert expanses , has always posed problems to defence planners...."

    FIGHTER A TO Z

    Volume 36, Issue 5, 1989, Air International

    Continuing the AIR INTERNATIONAL encyclopaedia of the world's fighter aircraft. from the North American P-51H Mustang to the North American F-86A Sabre.

    RECORDS AT RENO

    Volume 34, Issue 2, 1988, Air International

    Bill Johnston

    Bill Johnston provides a words-end- pictures report on the Unlimited-class racers at Aeno in 1987

    Mustang - the willing warhorse - part 4

    Volume 25, Issue 6, 1983, Air International

    Completing our history of the North American P-51 in the "Warbirds" series, we describe the Cavalier conversions and bring the story up-to-date with details and a cutaway drawing of the Piper enforcer

    Mustang - the willing warhorse

    Volume 25, Issue 4, 1983, Air International

    In the second installment of this "Warbirds" feature, the development of the merlin Mustang is described, and its operational deployment up to the end of World War II is recorded

    Beginner's luck?

    Volume 25, Issue 1, 1983, Air International

    Tegler J

    Being the story of how a rookie won at Reno, in the shape of a much-modified and lovingly rebuilt P-51 Mustang named "Dago Red" which took first place in the Unlimited Championship at the 1982 Reno Races. John Tegler provides the details

    Image of Mustangs Over Korea: The North American F-51 at War 1950-1953 (Schiffer Military History)

    Mustangs Over Korea: The North American F-51 at War 1950-1953

    David R McLaren

    Mustangs Over Korea is a documentary history of one of the most famous fighters ever built during a historically almost unrecognized war. Flown by four air forces in support of the United Nations, the F-51 Mustang dropped more napalm and fired more rockets than any other aircraft during that conflict and in the process suffered the highest number of losses. Told is the story of the bravery of the fighter-bomber pilots in the serious air-to-mud war against horrendous anti-aircraft fire, and also the first swirling air battles against the vaunted MiG-15.

    BRITAIN'S BLUENOSER'

    Number 241, August 2001, Flypast magazine

    Alan F Crouchman

    Alan F Crouchman concludes the fascinating story of Robs Lamplough's combat veteran P-51 Miss Helen.

    AMJET's Warbirds

    Number 162, January 1995, Flypast magazine

    Robert Rudhall

    An amazing collection in the USA. Although a little known organisation, several of AMJET's warbirds have already won several awards for excellence

    Image of North American A-36A Apache (Yellow (MMP Books))

    NORTH AMERICAN A-36A APACHE

    MMP Books - Yellow Przemyslaw Skulski

    The initial version of the famous P-51 Mustang to go into USAAF service was the dedicated fighter-bomber variant, the A-36A "Apache". This book describes and illustrates the design and development of this version of the most famous American WWII fighter.It contains: Scale plans, photos and drawings from technical manuals, superb color illustrations of camouflage and markings, rare black and white archive photographs, and color photos of the preserved aircraft. It is essential reading for aviation enthusiasts and scale aeromodelers.

    Image of Great Book of World War II Airplanes

    Great Book of World War II Airplanes

    Jeffrey L Ethell

    A remarkable overview of World War II aviation encompasses more than four hundred full-color photographs and illustrations, twenty-four foldout panels, detailed cutaway views, and authoritative profiles of twelve aircraft that changed the course of the war.

    Image of P-51 Mustang in Action - Aircraft No. 211

    P-51 Mustang in Action - Aircraft No. 211

    Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

    The P-51 Mustang was one of the most outstanding aircraft developed by the Allies during World War II. Indeed it combined the finest powerplant developed in Great Britain with the best airframe developed by American engineers. The Mustang could climb much faster than the Japanese Zero and out dive any Axis planes. It had no equal in terms of range. P-51s accounted for the destruction of more than 9,000 Luftwaffe aircraft with a loss of slightly more than 2,500 Mustangs, a ratio of almost 4 to 1. And that was just against the Germans! Dozens of period photographs from around the world illustrate the production, development, and evolution of the legendary Mustang. Illustrated with more than 130 photographs, plus color profiles and detailed line drawings; 64 pages.

    A Gathering of Mustangs and Legends

    Volume 51 ,Issue 3, 2006, American Aviation Historical Society (AAHS) Journal

    Photos by Joe Handelman , Text by Al Hansen

    The largest assemblage of the most famous fighter of World War II took place April 7-10, 1999, at "A Gathering of Mustangs and Legends," Kissimmee, Florida, airport. Approximately 65 Mustangs attended this gathering that was a real challenge for the Stallion 51 organization. For the non-flying P-51 fan with a camera, this was a once-in-a-lifetime chance to photograph, in one location, Mustangs from all over the United States.
    Joe Handelman, a retired dentist and long-time aviation photographer and member of AAHS, generously loaned AAHS his photos from the Gathering.

    Reno '84 in retrospect

    Volume 28, Issue 3, 1985, Air International

    Bill Johnston

    Since 1964, Reno as been the home of the US National Championshop air races, and event best known for the Unlimited Class races contested by hotted-up single-seat fighters. Particpants in the 1984 event are illustrated

    Unlimited racing with the hot ships

    Volume 2, Issue 5, 1972, Air International

    One of the minor phenomena of the US aviation scene is the use of hotted-up World War II fighter types to provide spectacular "unlimited" races at a number of locations each year. Our Veteran and Vintage Department presents a colourful glimpse of these nostalgia-provoking aircraft

    The Baby-Faced Ace

    Number 189, April 1997, Flypast magazine

    Harry Holmes

    The 'Welcome Friend' Coca Cola advertisement showing an American GI sharing a drink with a young American GI sharing a drink with a young RAF Leading Aircraftsman appeared on billboards all over the United States during 1943, but the American public could never have guessed that the baby-faced 'Britisher' would turn out to be one of their country's top fighter aces during World War Two. Harry Holmes tells the story of Ralph K Hofer

    'Just one race'

    Number 251, June 2002, Flypast magazine

    Scott Germain

    Ron Bucarelli has bought a Griffon Mustang back to Reno for a once-only contest. Scott Germain explains why

    KOREAN WAR CHEETAHS

    Number 233, December 2000, Flypast magazine

    Warren Thompson

    Warren E Thompson describes the South African Air Forces part in the Korean War, from Mustangs to Sabres

    Cavalier Conscripts

    Number 44, March 1985, Flypast magazine

    Paul Coggan

    Paul Coggan details the ultimate in Mustang custom conversions that culminated in the Enforcer

    Image of Fighter Command: American Fighters in Original WWII Color

    Fighter Command: American Fighters in Original WWII Color

    Jeffrey L Ethell

    Contrary to the impression left by most World War II books, the war was not fought in black and white. The planes, the people and the times were the most colorful in history.

    1/07/1991

    Shangri-La lives!

    Number 28, November 1983, Flypast magazine

    Jeffrey L Ethell

    Our American correspondent Jeff Ethell reports on the P-51 B Mustang which has been built from junk by Pete Regina as a replica of Don Gentile's

    Thoroughbred Pedigree

    Number 308, March 2007, Flypast magazine

    Alan F Crouchman

    Alan Crouchman pieces together the past of Peter Teichman's Mustang 'Jumpin' Jacques'. She may well have served with the legendry 'Tuskegee Airmen'.

    Magic Really Does Happen

    Number 312, July 2007, Flypast magazine

    Frank B Mormillo

    Wrecked by a ramp accident, the Eberhardt family Mustang looked like it would be out of the sky for years. Frank B Mormillo explains how 108 days later, the P-51 was back in the air.

    The 'Final Round-up'

    Number 317, December 2007, Flypast magazine

    Jarrod Cotter

    Jarrod Cotter reports from the Gathering of Mustangs and Legends, predicted to be the last time that so many P-51s and those associated with them will get together.

    Taking to the Silk - Twice

    Number 321, April 2008, Flypast magazine

    Warren Thompson

    Lt Melvin V Corley survived two bale-outs, once from an F-51 over Korea and later from an F-104. Warren E Thompson describes his lucky breaks.

    Day of the Ghost Bombers

    Number 326, September 2008, Flypast magazine

    Jerry Scutts

    US Eighth Air Force Mustangs duped the Luftwaffe into thinking they were a bomber stream. Jerry Scutts describes an incredible conflict.

    Tribute to an Ace

    Number 327, October 2008, Flypast magazine

    Jack Roush

    Jack Roush's newly-restored, award-winning, P-51B Mustang described by David Leininger.

    Airfields of SW England

    Number 191, June 1997, Flypast magazine

    We are concluding our three-part look at the World War Two period airfields in the SW of England, with Hampshire and the final part of Gloucestershire.

    'Marinell' makes Two!

    Number 330, January 2009, Flypast magazine

    Maurice Hammond

    Maurice Hammond's second P-51 restoration recently took to the skies. Jarrod Cotter tells the story of this resurrection.

    The Horsemen Cometh!

    Number 337, August 2009, Flypast magazine

    Frank B Mormillo

    Frank B Mormillo profiles the three-ship Mustang team heading for the UK and a unique appearance at ‘Flying Legends’.

    Mustang’s Triumphant Return

    Number 339, October 2009, Flypast magazine

    David Leininger

    A rare P-51C Mustang is back in action. David Leininger presents a stunning photographic tribute.

    Happy Days

    Number 343, February 2010, Flypast magazine

    An award-winning restoration is one of the most eye-catching Mustangs around. David Leininger photography.

    Fighter Legend

    Number 345, April 2010, Flypast magazine

    David Leininger

    David Leininger goes ‘face-to-face’ with Mustang ‘ace’ ‘Bud’ Anderson.

    A Life on the Edge

    Volume 36, Issue 08, 2008, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Tony Harmsworth

    The first half of Tony Harmsworth's profile of the colourful life of RAF Mustang pilot, Life photographer and diamond smuggler Terry Spencer

    The Atomic Mustangs of Emu

    Volume 36, Issue 04, 2008, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Geoff Goodall

    Geoff Goodall relates the story of the RAAF Mustangs used during the testing of British atomic weapons in Australia's outback in the late 1950s

    One Thousand Hours in a Mustang

    Volume 36, Issue 03, 2008, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Photographer Richard Paver reports on the Mustang milestone reached by P-51 owner Rob Davies, who recently logged his 1,000th hour in the type

    Flying the Legend

    Volume 35, Issue 12, 2007, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Paul Redlich

    The Tri-State Warbird Museum's President and Mustang pilot Paul Redlich guides us through flying America's most famous piston fighter. With photography by Xavier Meal

    Mustang Show Report

    Volume 35, Issue 12, 2007, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Tony Harmsworth

    The Gathering of Mustangs and Legends held at Columbus, Ohio, commemorated both man and machine. Aeroplane's Assistant Editor, Tony Harmsworth, was there and spoke to the veterans who flew the P-51 into history

    Mustang with a Difference

    Volume 33, Issue 02, 2005, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Michael O'Leary

    Michael O'Leary describes the world's only two-seat, dual-control, high-back P-51

    Dutch Mustang

    Volume 6 Issue 12, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Trevor Pask

    Following last month’s survey of 1/72 scale P-51D Mustang kits, Trevor builds ‘the winner’, the Tamiya offering – in Netherlands East Indies Air Force markings...

    Korean War Mustangs

    Volume 6 Issue 11, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Tony O’Toole

    Models five of the currently available F-51D Mustang kits in 1/72 scale – and gives them marks out of ten!

    Mustangles: Part Three: The Wandering Caribous

    Volume 4 Issue 5, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Vic Scheuerman

    Models a pair of No 442 (Caribou) Squadron, RCAF, Mustang Mk IVs, whilst, Randy Lutz builds Wg Cdr James Eric Storrar's, Mustang Mk IVA - using IPMS Canada’s quaintly named ‘Sweating Beaver’ decals

    Mustangles Part Two: RAF Mustang Mk IVs

    Volume 4 Issue 5, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Nick Greenhall

    The second of a multi-part series devoted to modelling the immortal Mustang - describes how he chose and built a camouflaged Mustang Mk IV of No 19 Squadron RAF... and Neil Robinson gets in on the act by building a ‘silver’ Mustang Mk IVA also of No 19 Squadron - both based at Peterhead in March/April 1945, with the short-lived but distinctive black and yellow nose bands!

    Unsung Hero

    Volume 4 Issue 5, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

    Peter Wass

    Ex-RAF wartime fighter pilot, Peter Wass, relates his memories of flying Mustangs with No 19 Squadron in 1944/45

    Fear the Ghost

    Volume 46, Issue 12, 2010, Air Classics

    Complete history of a famous racer and Jimmy Leewards plans for the future

    Personal Album

    Volume 4, Issue 05, 1976, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Our selection this month comes from an album submitted by Mr AL Homersham of Epson, Surrey, and features aircraft seen in the middle east during 1946-48

    Image of Mustang Aces of the 357th Fighter Group (Aircraft of the Aces)

    No. 96 - Mustang Aces of the 357th Fighter Group

    Aircraft of the Aces Chris Bucholtz

    The 357th Fighter Group produced 42 aces, more than any other group within the USAAF. It was also the first group in the Eighth Air Force to be equipped with the P-51. Thanks to this fighter and the talented pilots assigned to the group (men such as Bud Anderson, Kit Carson, John England and Chuck Yeager) the 357th achieved a faster rate of aerial victories than any other Eighth Air Force group during the final year of the war. It also claimed the highest number of aerial kills - 56 - in a single mission.

    The group was awarded two Distinguished Unit Citations (the unit equivalent of the Medal of Honor). Written by Chris Bucholtz, this book is crammed full of first-hand accounts, superb photography and some of the most colorful profiles to be found in World War II aviation.

    No. 45 - P-51 Mustang in Action

    Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

    The P-51's design story begins in early 1940. The British Purchasing Commission (BPC) contacted North American Aviation (NAA) about the possibility of the company license-building P-40 Tomahawks for the RAF. The North American people balked at the idea and instead tried to convince the BPC that they should build an entirely new fighter of NAA's own design. Although skeptical because North American had previously produced only trainer aircraft, the BPC agreed reluctantly to view the proposal. In January 1940, 'Dutch' Kindeberger, president of North American, and lee Atwood, vice president, proposed the construction of 320 NA-73s, as the new aircraft was called, for the RAF. The NA-73 was to be powered by an Allison engine, cost no more than $40,000.00 per aircraft and be armed to BPC specifications. The proposal was accepted by the BPC in April 1940 and thus was the Mustang born.

    UK-based Mustangs

    Volume 55, Issue 12, 1993, Air Pictorial

    Keith Saunders

    Keith Saunders details the various P-51s that are currently based in the British Isles and looks at their history.

    Image of Merlin Power: The Growl Behind Air Power in World War II

    Merlin Power: The Growl Behind Air Power in World War II

    Victor Bingham

    The Rolls-Royce Merlin is considered by many to be the most outstanding liquid-cooled reciprocating piston engine of World War II. It powered the majority of Allied aircraft in Europe, including British and American designs. This book examines the origins of the engine's development from its predecessor, the Kestrel, through its single-stage conception to its two-speed, two-stage final form. Twenty-two Merlin powered aircraft are then examined in depth with examinations of development, design, construction and eventual operation. Wonderful design drawings by Lyndon Jones are themselves masterpieces. Included amongst the aircraft described in the book are the Avro Lancaster, Lincoln and York, the de Havilland Mosquito and Hornet, the Bristol Beaufighter II and IV, the Hawker Hurricane and Supermarine Spitfire, the North American Mustang, the Handley Page Halifax, the Curtiss P40 Kittyhawk and the Vickers Wellington.

    Image of Very Long Range P-51 Mustang Units of the Pacific War (Aviation Elite Units)

    Very Long Range P-51 Mustang Units of the Pacific War (Aviation Elite Units)

    Carl Molesworth

    The pilots called themselves the 'Tokyo Club'. It was a simple task to become a member. All you had to do was strap yourself into a heavily loaded P-51 Mustang, take off from Iwo Jima (a postage-stamp sized volcanic island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean), fly 650 miles north over the sea - often through monsoon storms - in your single-engined aircraft to Japan, attack a heavily defended target in the vicinity of the enemy's capital city and then turn around and fly home while fretting over your shrinking fuel supply and perhaps battle damage as well. If your gas held out and you were not blown off-course on your return trip, you landed back at 'Iwo' after an eight-hour flight. Do it once and you earned membership in the club. Do it 15 times and you earned a trip home. But make one mistake or have one touch of bad luck, and you had a very good chance of ending up dead.
    This book will tell the little-known story of these brave men and their efforts to defeat the aerial forces defending Japan during the final five months of World War 2. Used initially to provide fighter escort for B-29s bombing Tokyo and other Japanese cities, the Iwo Jima-based P-51s enjoyed such success that they were soon called on to make low-level attacks against ground targets in preparation for the invasion of Japan.
    The book will cover the three Mustang-equipped Very Long Range fighter groups of the USAAF's Seventh Fighter Command - the 15th, 21st and 506th FGs - based on Iwo Jima with an action-packed text, many rare photos drawn from private collections and appendices providing statistical information. These units flew some of the most colourful P-51s ever seen in USAAF, and the author has extensive photographic references available to allow Jim Laurier to produce profile illustrations of 30 P-51D/Ks in their finery.

    Image of P-51 Mustang (Combat Legends)

    P-51 Mustang (Combat Legends)

    Kevin Darling

    The Mustang was the greatest godsend to the massive daylight bomber fleets that pounded Hitler's Reich during WW2. It was the first aircraft to have the range and ability to intercept and destroy German fighters that had previously decimated Allied attacks and caused the loss of many US aircrew members. Designed and built in the USA to a British specification, the early models were under-powered and it was not until the famous Merlin engine was installed that its full potential was realized. The type played a vital part in all wartime theatres and went on to serve with many air forces in post-war years. This is the perfect introductory book for the general reader, enthusiast and modeler alike wishing to find a succinct yet detailed introduction to the design and history of the Mustang.

    Image of North American P-51H Mustang: Includes Lightweight Fighters XP-51F, XP51G, XP51J (Air Force Legends)

    P-51H Mustang: Includes Lightweight Fighters XP-51F, XP51G, XP51J (Air Force Legends)

    David R McLaren

    The North American Aviation Corporation's series of "Lightweight" Mustangs, the XP-51F, XP51G, XP-51J, and ultimately the P-51H, came as a result of North American's further development of their standard P-51A and B/C designs. These efforts were the direct result of combat experience in Europe in attempting to counter the fast German Luftwaffe's Focke Wulf 190 with its higher rate of roll, and the requirement in the Pacific Theater for a light, long-range fighter to counter Japanese aircraft, particularly the long-range, high manueverable Mitsubishi A6M Reisen ("Zero" or "Zeke").

    Image of USAAF Fighter Units: Europe 1942-1945 (Osprey Airwar 8)

    USAAF Fighter Units: Europe 1942-1945 (Osprey Airwar 8)

    Rene J Francillon

    This book traces the combat history of USAAF fighter units in the European theatre of World War 2. Major aircraft types are all covered, and their missions detailed. Aircraft markings and aircrew uniforms are shown in full colour illustrations.

    15/07/1977

    Image of Excalibur III: The Story of a P-51 Mustang (Famous Aircraft of the National Air & Space Museum)

    Excalibur III: The Story of a P-51 Mustang (Famous Aircraft of the National Air & Space Museum)

    Robert C Mikesh

    Excalibur III The Story of a P-51 Mustang by Robert C. Mikesh, (1978, Paperback). Excalibur III (North American P-51C) nearly missed its chance for glory by not being assigned to a combat squadron. Instead of ending up in the Boneyard, it went on to amass great racing victories and records and also to develop new navigational techniques for air transportation routes across the top of the world. The inside pages of the Book are in Very Good Condition. The front and back covers show some wear along the edges.

    17/08/1978

    Image of Roar Of The Tiger : From Flying Tigers to Mustangs , A Fighter Ace's Memoir

    Roar Of The Tiger : From Flying Tigers to Mustangs , A Fighter Ace's Memoir

    James H Howard

    A World War II pilot recounts his experiences, which included flying with Claire Chennault's fabled Flying Tigers, matching his P-40 Tomahawk fighter against a force of Japanese Zeros. Reprint. K. LJ.

    20/07/1991

    Image of The Cutting Edge: A Half Century of U.S. Fighter Aircraft R&D

    The Cutting Edge: A Half Century of U.S. Fighter Aircraft R&D

    Mark Lorell

    The proposition that innovation is critical in the cost-effective design and development of successful military aircraft is still subject to some debate. RAND research indicates that innovation is promoted by intense competition among three or more industry competitors. Given the critical policy importance of this issue in the current environment of drastic consolidation of the aerospace defense industry, the authors here examine the history of the major prime contractors in developing jet fighters since World War II. They make use of an extensive RAND database that includes nearly all jet fighters, fighter-attack aircraft, and bombers developed and flown by U.S. industry since 1945, as well as all related prototypes, modifications, upgrades, etc. The report concludes that (1) experience matters, because of the tendency to specialize and thus to develop system-specific expertise; (2) yet the most dramatic innovations and breakthroughs came from secondary or marginal players trying to compete with the industry leaders; and (3) dedicated military R&D conducted or directly funded by the U.S. government has been critical in the development of new higher-performance fighters and bombers.

    25/10/1998

    Image of To Fly and Fight: Memoirs of a Triple Ace

    To Fly and Fight: Memoirs of a Triple Ace

    Clarence E Anderson

    Touching, thoughtful, and dead honest, To Fly and Fight is the story of a boy who grew up living his dream. During World War II Anderson flew with Chuck Yeager in the famed 357th Squadron where he became a triple ace by shooting out of the sky fifteen enemy planes. Following World

    War II, Anderson became a test pilot and later commanded jet fighter squadrons in South Korea and Okinawa. Then, in 1970, at an age when most pilots have long-since retired, Anderson flew combat strikes over Vietnam.

    1/07/1999

    Image of Herky!: The Memoirs of a Checker Ace (Schiffer Military History)

    Herky! The Memoirs of a Checkertail Ace

    Herschel H Green

    The dramatic life story of one of the legendary USAAF fighter pilots of World War II who fought across the skies over the Mediterranean and southern Europe in the great aerial campaigns against the Luftwaffe Herschel H. Herky Green. By the time Colonel Green was grounded by orders of higher headquarters, he was the leading ace of the 15th Air Force with eighteen aerial victories.

    1/01/2000

    Image of Hot Shots: An Oral History of the Air Force Combat Pilots of the Korean War

    Hot Shots: An Oral History of the Air Force Combat Pilots of the Korean War

    Jennie E Chancey

    Known as the "Forgotten War," the Korean War heralded a new era of warfare--one where countries from around the world struggled over the fate of a relatively small peninsula jutting into the Sea of Japan. Between 1950 and 1953, more than fifty thousand Americans gave their lives in pursuit of democracy for the Korean people.

    The Korean War was also the proving ground for post-World War II aviation, when the first generation of jet aircraft took to the skies to tangle in deadly combat. It was the battlefield of Sabres and MiGs, American Hot Shots and Communist Honchos. And more than ever before, control of the skies meant victory or failure in the ground war raging below.

    Now, fifty years after the war's outbreak, Hot Shots captures the voices of the original top guns, the pilots who flew Mustangs, Sabres, and Shooting Stars and confronted a superior number of enemy aircraft. Among the men who tell their stories are Lieutenant Colonel Duane E. "Bud" Biteman, one of the first fliers in the war; Lieutenant General Frederick "Boots" Blesse, double ace who led efforts to refine tactical training for the new jet pilots; Colonel Cecil Foster, who fought in one of the longest-running air-to-air jet encounters; and Colonel Harold Fischer, a double-ace flier who was captured behind enemy lines and held as a POW until 1955, two years after the official end of the war.

    Editors Chancey and Forstchen combine these compelling firsthand accounts with dozens of never-before-published photographs of air force pilots at work, as well as a history of the major events of the war. Hot Shots brings to vivid life the risk, dedication, and bravery of these forgotten heroes. May their sacrifice not be in vain.

    1/04/2000

    Image of Straight Down!: The North American A-36 Dive-Bomber in Action

    Straight Down!: The North American A-36 Dive-Bomber in Action

    Peter Smith

    This story, which has largely been ignored by historians, charts the development of the North American A-36 dive-bomber, the training of its young pilots, and finally, through their own eyes, the graphic accounts of combat missions in Europe and Asia come to life in unbelievable detail.

    27/08/2000

    Image of Griffon-Powered Mustangs - Raceplane Tech Vol. 1

    Griffon-Powered Mustangs - Raceplane Tech Vol. 1

    A Kevin Grantham

    This first volume in the Raceplane Tech Series features the evolution of the world record-setting Red Baron; World Jet Mustang development and racing history; the evolution of Miss Ashley II, airframe and cockpit modifications, including Lear Jet wings; F-86 tail; Griffon engine development; and unlimited racing results. Raceplane Tech, Volume 1.

    12/10/2000

    Image of Black Knights: The Story of the Tuskegee Airmen

    Black Knights: The Story of the Tuskegee Airmen

    Lynn Homan

    The story of the men and women who served at Tuskegee Army Air Field from 1941 to 1946.

    31/01/2001

    Image of Tuskegee Airmen Story, The

    Tuskegee Airmen Story, The

    Lynn Homan

    A grandfather reminisces about his service as a Tuskegee Airman.

    30/09/2002

    Image of Flying Legends: P-51 Mustang

    Flying Legends: P-51 Mustang

    John M Dibbs

    The greatest fighter to emerge from WWII is brought vividly to life through the stunning photographs of John Dibbs. The story is told through quotes and anecdotes of the greatest Mustang Aces of WWII. Poignant archival images are complemented by 21 of the most accurate Mustang restorations flying today. Filled with details of the men, machines and battle groups, plus forewords by Aces "Bud" Anderson and Col. Robert Goebel.

    30/11/2002

    Image of I Was a P-51 Fighter Pilot in WWII: A Collection of Hard-to-Find Stories About Aviation in The Piston-Powered Era, 1903-1945

    I Was a P-51 Fighter Pilot in WWII: A Collection of hard-to-find Stories about Aviation in The Piston-Powered Era 1903?1945

    James White

    SOME OF THE 150 STORIES IN THIS BOOK:·What WWII was all about·How the German Luftwaffe began and ended·Adolph Hitler's Nazi party and the Waffen SS·8th Air Force raids over Europe·P-51 Mustang battles with Me-109·1093's Cleveland Air Races·Wright Brother's flight in 1903·WWI Bi-planes in France·P-40s in the Flying Tigers·D-Day and P-47 Thunderbolts·Winter War in Finland·Barbarossa and airplane battles·Zeros in Southeast Asia·P-39 Airacobras fight for Russia·War-Booty in WWII·Hitler robs art treasures·How P-51 Mustangs stopped the Luftwaffe·How the Nazi Gestapo operated·The author's personal observations of WWIIThis book is dedicated to Orville and Wilbur Wright who discovered flight in 1903You may purchase this book ISBN 0-595-28235-0 from www.iuniverse.com

    18/11/2003

    Image of 479th Fighter Group in World War II: In Action over Europe With the P-38 And P-51

    479th Fighter Group in World War II: In Action over Europe With the P-38 And P-51

    Terry A Fairfield

    This book is the result of nearly six years of research, gathering of materials and interviews. It presents a chronological listing of the 479th Fighter Group's activities during the World War II era, from its beginnings until its deactivation. Based upon a summation of the group's historical records, the account also contains personal anecdotes provided by many of the group's former members as well as over 650 photos that serve to illustrate the narration. Hopefully through the assemblage of this information the memory of the group and the men who comprised the living, lifeblood of the 479th FG will be better known and remembered by future generations.

    30/01/2004

    Image of Modelling the P-51 Mustang (Modelling Guides)

    Modelling the P-51 Mustang (Osprey Modelling)

    Stan Spooner

    The North American P-51 Mustang had a humble genesis as a British request for single engine escort fighter. The projects in the book take the modeller from the aircraft's beginnings to the ultimate manifestation of this elegant and deadly bird, the F-82 G/H Twin Mustang. The North American P-51 Mustang had a humble genesis as a British request for single engine escort fighter. "Dutch" Kindelberger's North American design team created, in just six months, a prototype that would become, arguably, World War II's most important fighter aircraft. The aircraft was designed around the innovative laminar flow wing, which resulted in a much more efficient flow of air across the top of the wing, thereby reducing drag and increasing range. Modelling is the perfect format to appreciate this revolutionary design feature which created a highly maneuverable plane with excellent range.

    This book pays attention to the crucial details and methods needed to model the Mustang, at differing skill levels and with unique finishing tips and styles - showing the benefits of scratch built components, all illustrated in a clear concise and easy to use manner.

    21/08/2007

    Image of P-51 Mustang Pilot's Flight Manual

    P-51 Mustang Pilot's Flight Manual

    Periscope Filmcom

    Used primarily as a long-range bomber escort in raids over Germany, the North American P-51 Mustang earned a reputation for toughness and agility in dogfights. Carrying a two-stage supercharged V-12 Merlin engine and armed with six .50 caliber machine guns, the P-51 helped the Allies gain air superiority in the skies over Europe. P-51s were flown by the famed Tuskegee Airmen, and remained in service during the Korean War. World airforces made extensive use of the Mustang, some into the 1980's. Originally published by North American Aviation and classified "Restricted", this manual was declassified long ago and is here reprinted in book form. This affordable facsimile has been reformatted, and color images appear as black and white. Care has been taken however to preserve the integrity of the text.

    3/05/2006

    Image of In Their Own Words: True Stories and Adventures of the American Fighter Ace

    In Their Own Words: True Stories and Adventures of the American Fighter Ace

    James Oleson

    More than 100 legendary pilots have granted and shared personal glimpses of their illustrious military careers to help create this tribute to the American Fighter Ace.In Their Own Words: True Stories and Adventures of the American Fighter Ace explores and illustrates the courage, resourcefulness and patriotism of America's fighter aces. These heroic flyers have given personal glimpses and recollections on what it took to fly, fight and survive combat missions in World War II and Korea.

    13/11/2007

    Image of The Flying Greek: An Immigrant Fighter Ace's WWII Odyssey with the RAF, USAAF, and French Resistance

    The Flying Greek: An Immigrant Fighter Ace's WWII Odyssey with the RAF, USAAF, and French Resistance

    Col Steve N Pisanos USAF (Ret)

    Steve N. Pisanos’s The Flying Greek is both the classic tale of an immigrant’s bond with America and an aerial adventure. When young Pisanos arrived in the U.S. in 1938, he worked, studied English, and learned to fly. He earned a private pilot’s license in 1941, and soon after Germany invaded Greece, he volunteered for the embattled British Royal Air Force. He served with the 268 and 71 Eagle Squadrons. The 71 Eagle Squadron was one of three Eagle squadrons comprised of U.S. volunteers. In 1942, he became a naturalized U.S. citizen while in London, England. He was the first individual in American history to become a citizen while outside the U.S. border, and his becoming a citizen allowed him to be commissioned a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army Air Forces.

    In riveting detail, Pisanos recounts his combat record, from fighter sweeps and bomber escort missions to dogfighting, flying the Spitfire, the P-47, and the P-51. While flying a P-47 named Miss Plainfield, he scored his first aerial victory on May 21, 1943. By January 1, 1944, he had become an ace. After his tenth confirmed kill, he crash-landed his P-51 in France and spent six months with the French Resistance, successfully evading capture. Because of his exposure to the French operations, the Air Force could not risk his capture again, so he returned to the U.S. and became a test pilot at Wright Field where he also attended the Air Force’s test pilot school.

    Despite grave danger, Pisanos set aside his pride, fears, and misgivings to help achieve a greater good. The Flying Greek is an entertaining and remarkable journey that will interest historians and aviation enthusiasts.

    15/02/2008

    Image of North American P-51 Mustang: 1940 Onwards (all marks) (Owners' Workshop Manual)

    North American P-51 Mustang: 1940 Onwards (all marks) (Owner's Workshop Manual)

    Jarrod Cotter

    The North American P-51 Mustang holds an important place in US aviation history as its finest fighter aircraft of all time. During the Second World War it was the only Allied fighter capable of flying to Berlin and back from Britain without refueling. Read about the Mustang’s illustrious combat history and take a close-up look at how it is constructed. Discover what it takes to own and fly this classic fighter, and find out how engineers keep it airworthy. Centrepieces of this manual are co-author Maurice Hammond’s Second World War-vintage Merlin-engine P-51Ds – Janie and Marinell.

    15/03/2011

    Image of Mustang Ace: Memoirs of a P-51 Fighter Pilot

    Mustang Ace: Memoirs of a P-51 Fighter Pilot

    Robert J Goebel

    MUSTANG ACE
    Memoirs of a P-51 Fighter Pilot
    by
    Robert J. Goebel

    When Robert Goebel left home to join the Army Air Corps in 1942, he was a 19 years old and a high-school graduate. The only previous time he had traveled far from his native Racine, Wisconsin, was an epic trip in the summer of 1940, when he and a pal had ridden the rails to Texas and back to visit two of Bob's brothers who were in the service.

    Even during his weeks in Pre-flight training, young Goebel found that he felt at home in the service, and he looked forward to the great adventure on which he had embarked out of a sense of patriotism and yearning to see the wide world. Easygoing and quick to learn, Cadet Goebel worked his way steadily through the Basic, Primary, and Advanced phases of military flight training, and found in himself an aptitude for flight. However, like nearly all of his comrades, Goebel could not learn how to hit a flying target with the guns mounted on the trainers he flew. Nevertheless, he—and they—graduated to fighter school and, after earning their wings and commissions, were sent on to join an operational fighter unit—in Panama.

    The months of rigorous operational flying in Panama seasoned Lieutenant Goebel and his young companions, and made better aviators of them, but it did little to advance their gunnery skills. When a new crop of novices arrived, Goebel and his companions found themselves on their way to Europe to join the fight. They wound up in North Africa in the Spring of 1944 with orders to join the 31st Fighter Group in Italy.

    Just as Goebel and his young companions were about to join the leading fighter group in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations, the 31st turned in its British-made Spitfire fighters for new P-51 Mustang fighters. Within weeks, Bob Goebel had flown his first combat missions and had lost his element leader, who was shot down in a swirling dogfight.

    But master the job he did. A steady succession of bomber-escort missions over southeastern Europe slowly and then more rapidly forced Lieutenant Goebel to settle in and master aerial gunnery and the mentally taxing high-speed dogfights in which he became engaged. At last, he shot down his first German fighter. And he advanced to positions of leadership, in due course leading the entire 31st Fighter Group deep into enemy territory. At length, he shot down a fifth German and thus became an ace—a Mustang Ace. And then he shot down three Germans in one day on a mission to Ploesti, Rumania. He flew to Russia and back, and supported the invasion of southern France. In the end, by September 1944, he had eleven confirmed victories to his credit and was one of the 308th Fighter Squadron's most respected combat leaders.

    When he was sent home at the end of his combat tour, Captain Bob Goebel was not yet 22 years old.

    1/10/1991

    Image of Mustang: North American P-51 (Living History Series World War II)

    Mustang: North American P-51 (Living History Series World War II)

    Paul Perkins

    The third volume in the "Living History" series, MUSTANG uses historical reenactors and magnificently restored aircraft to show cockpits, flight dress, gun ports, engines, and ground service responsibilities of the Mustang, perhaps the most important fighter of WWII. 58 color photos, 47 b&w photos and illustrations. b&w photos and illustrations.

    1/03/1995

    Image of The Tuskegee Airmen: The Men Who Changed a Nation

    The Tuskegee Airmen: The Men Who Changed a Nation

    Charles E Francis

    Long before Civil Rights, the Tuskegee Airmen fought for equality. First they integrated the Armed Forces, then a whole nation and did it with competency, skill, valor, and courage in combating the enemy abroad and racism at home. Because they stood tall, African Americans and fellow Americans are the better for it. The book of over 500 pages also contains about 100 photos, an appendix full of documents, and an Index of 25 pages.

    1/06/1997

    Image of 249 At War : The Authorized History of the Raf's Top Claiming Squadron of WWII

    249 At War : The Authorized History of the Raf's Top Claiming Squadron of WWII

    Brian Cull

    This is an exciting history of the Royal Air Force's foremost fighting squadron, formed during WWII, details the unit's combat roles and the planes they flew.

    1/10/1997

    Image of The 356th Fighter Group in WWII, in Action Over Europe with the P-47 and P-51 (Schiffer Military History Book)

    The 356th Fighter Group in World War II in Action over Europe

    Kent D Miller

    Here for the first time is the story of the 356th Fighter Group which flew in the European Theater of Operations during the Second World War. This 9th Air Force unit spent over two years in England, occupying the airfield at Martlesham Heath, in the county of Suffolk. Originally entering combat flying P-47 Thunderbolts, and later switching to P-51 Mustangs, the 356th dispatched its aircraft on 407 missions across the Channel. Between the time of the first, on October 15, 1943, and the final mission on May 7, 1945, the 356th was credited with destroying 277 enemy planes. As the principle of bomber escort was strictly adhered to by the 356ths leaders, pilots of the group often had to pass up opportunities to engage enemy fighters and increase their scores. While this fact helped earn the 356th a reputation as being a hard luck outfit, due to their low victory to loss ratio, the gratitude and praise from the bomber crews more than offset this misnomer.

    1/03/2003

    Type Report

    Number 111, October 1990, Flypast magazine

    Nick Veronico

    Nick Veronico chronicles the amazing number of surviving P-51's.

    P-51 at 50

    Number 111, October 1990, Flypast magazine

    Pull-out to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the first flight of the Mustang, we offer reader a chance to fly in one

    Swiss Mustangs

    Number 64, November 1986, Flypast magazine

    Paul Coggan

    Paul Coggan and Salvador Mate Heurtas recall the Swiss experience with P-51s.

    Type Report

    Number 51, October 1985, Flypast magazine

    Stuart McKay

    Stuart McKay extends his wingspan and Paul Coggan pays tribute to the Mustang's creator.

    Enforcer Rejected

    Number 40, November 1984, Flypast magazine

    has cancellation of the Piper Enforcer programme brought the P-5ID Mustang line to an end?

    Type Report

    Number 32, March 1984, Flypast magazine

    This new series on the more popular aircraft in the preservation world brings up-to-date information on the Mustang and Tiger Moth.

    New Mustangs for old

    Number 11, June 1982, Flypast magazine

    Paul Coggan

    Paul Coggan updates the news on current P-51 Mustang preservation projects around the world.

    Rebirth of the Mustang?

    Number 7, February 1982, Flypast magazine

    Donald Hannah

    Paul Coggan updates us on the Piper Enforcer, which is based on the wartime P-51 Mustang.

    Raf Mustangs In Action

    Number 255, October 2002, Flypast magazine

    Graham Pitchfork

    Bomb Venice - But Don't Break Anything Precious! Graham Pitchfork Starts A Two-Parter On An Amazing Airstrike.

    Strange Encounter

    Number 222, January 2000, Flypast magazine

    Shlomo Aloni

    Flying A P-51 For The Israeli Air Force, A Pilot Tries To Piece Together A Fascinating Encounter. Shiomo Aloni Undertakes The Detective Work.

    Mustang Generations

    Number 219, October 1999, Flypast magazine

    Dick Phillips

    Warbird Historian Dick Phillips Presents A 'Before And After' Portfolio Of Selected P-51s.

    Warbird Market

    Number 197, December 1997, Flypast magazine

    A Look At The Current State Of The Market In The Usa What Do You Have To Pay For A P-51? Or A T-28

    Mustang Miscellany

    Number 3, September 1981, Flypast magazine

    One of the most preserved WW11 aircraft is the Mustang. Paul Coggan reviews the latest finds.

    Image of 315 Squadron

    315 Squadron

    Wojtek Matusiak

    On 8th January 1941, the Air Ministry approved the formation of a new Polish fighter squadron at RAF Acklington, just north of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Most of the pilots were from the Polish city of Deblin, a famous nursery for Polish airmen, and 315 squadron became known as "Deblinski". The Polish pilots flew Hurricanes, Spitfires and Mustangs and served at bases throughout England and Norhtern Ireland during the Battle of Britain and until the end of the war. This book is the definitive work by leading Polish aviation authorities and the only book available in English on this subject.

    Image of North American P-51D Mustang (MMP: Yellow)

    NORTH AMERICAN P-51D MUSTANG (MMP: Yellow)

    Robert Peczkowski

    This detailed monograph covers the design and development of the P-51D Mustang family, the main wartime production variant of this classic fighter.

    The P-51D model introduced the definitive ‘bubble’ canopy and heavier armament, and was the mount of many aces. After W.W.II the Mustang saw action again in Korea, and also served with many other air forces around the world. 'North American P-51D Mustang' contains comprehensive technical details of the American built P-51D, P-51K and the Australian CAC Mustangs.

    Numerous specially selected original NAA technical photographs

    Production and service photos

    A wide range of color profiles from 29 nations

    Rare color photographs from WWII

    Detailed photographs featuring modern highly accurate restorations, inside and out, and including under rebuild and servicing details.

    Full plans in three popular scales

    Illustrated with photos throughout, including a comprehensive walk-around section showing all aspects of the airframe, and diagrams from official manuals.

    This book provides all the core technical details of the P-51D family in one compact, economical volume.

    REVIEWS

    A very extensive walk around section in color covers all aspects of the airframe, combining wartime photos and 31 excerpts from technical manuals and color photos of many restored Mustangs...invaluable to modelers

    Cybermodeler




    This book has it all…. Cockpit illustrations and photos from every angle, full color detail images of the landing gear and wheel wells, excellent technical images of the engine showing all the “plumbing”….and full color profiles and color images….. a true modeler’s delight.

    This publication is highly recommended!
    IPMS

    Image of P-51 Mustang vs Fw 190: Europe 1943-45 (Duel)

    P-51 Mustang vs Fw 190: Europe 1943-45 (Duel)

    Martin Bowman

    Discover the history of a classic duel as the finest American and German pilots are pitted against each other in the war-torn skies over Europe, in two of the most advanced fighter planes of the age, the P-51 and the Fw 190.

    This exciting first book in a brand new, innovative series describes the design and development of these rivals and analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of each fighter through an examination of the key elements of airframe, engine, armament and flying characteristics. Also explored is the training the combatants received prior to tours of duty, providing an insight into the lives of the pilots as they tested both themselves and their planes in the deadly art of combat. Specially commissioned cockpit digital artwork allows the reader to relive the thrill and terror of a dogfight as these two evenly matched opponents battled for supremacy in the skies above Europe.

    Image of P-51 D/K: Mustangs Over the Third Reich (Air Battles)

    P-51 D/K: Mustangs Over the Third Reich (Air Battles)

    Tomasz Szlagor

    Lavishly illustrated, this book covers the combat history of the P-51 D/K Mustangs over the Third Reich. The P-51 fighter aircraft was in service with Allied air forces in Europe and also saw limited service against the Japanese in the Pacific War. The D became the most widely produced variant of the Mustang. A variation of the P-51D equipped with an Aeroproducts propeller in place of the Hamilton Standard propeller was designated the P-51K.

    Content includes an introduction to the P-51D, Jets, Jabos, Mistels and Russians, as well as a bibliography and appendices.

    About the Series: Air Battles is a series of books focusing on World War II air battles of specific aircraft and units. Each volume contains information on the planes involved, lists of scores, pilot reports and portraits, color profile artwork and maps. Over 50 photographs feature in each book, with free extras for modelers, such as masking foil and decal sheets.

    Image of P-51 Mustang Pilot's Flight Operating Instructions

    P-51 Mustang Pilot's Flight Operating Instructions

    United States Army Air Force

    Used primarily as a long-range bomber escort in raids over Germany, the North American P-51 Mustang earned a reputation for toughness and agility in dogfights. Carrying a two-stage supercharged V-12 Merlin engine and armed with six .50 caliber machine guns, the P-51 helped the Allies gain air superiority in the skies over Europe. P-51s were flown by the famed Tuskegee Airmen, and remained in service during the Korean War. World airforces made extensive use of the Mustang, some into the 1980's. Originally published by North American Aviation and the U.S. Army Air Force in 1945, this manual was originally classified "Restricted". It was declassified long ago and is here reprinted in book form. This affordable facsimile has been reformatted, and color images appear as black and white. Care has been taken to preserve the integrity of the text

    Image of North American P-51 Mustang (Crowood Aviation)

    North American P-51 Mustang (Crowood Aviation)

    Malcolm V Lowe

    The P-51 Mustang is one of the greatest warplanes of all time. Developed as a private venture, it was seized upon by the British as the answer to their shortage of fighter aircraft in the early months of World War Two. Early Allison-engined Mustangs lacked performance at high altitude, but the great promise of the airframe was clear, and when fitted with the Rolls-Royce Merlin the Mustang became one of the best pistoned-engined fighters ever built. Not only was its performance on a par with the best British and German fighters of the era, but it was the first single-engined fighter with range sufficient to accompany bombers from Great Britain to Berlin and back. This new history of the Mustang tells the full story of its development, technical features and operational history, and also looks at its long post-war career as warbird and racer. Malcolm Lowe also dispels many of the myths that have grown up around the Mustang.

    Image of 2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 2: Breakout to Bodenplatte, July 1944 to January 1945

    2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 2: Breakout to Bodenplatte, July 1944 to January 1945

    Chris Thomas

    It has been more than 30 years since the original and highly acclaimed history of 2nd Tactical Air Force was first published, and it has been long out of print. Now at last, this book is a completely rewritten and greatly expanded account of this important command's vital contribution to the Invasion of Normandy and the defeat of the forces of the Third Reich in Western Europe. The 2nd TAF, equipped with rocket- and bomb-carrying Typhoons, Tempests, Spitfires, Mosquitos, Mustangs and medium bombers, flew ground-attack and tank-busting missions in support of Montgomery's 21st Army Group as it advanced through Normandy and northwest Europe in 1944-45. The medium bomber units struck at enemy transport, ammunition dumps, and communication targets. The 2nd TAF comprised British, Canadian, Polish, Czech, Norwegian, French, South African, Australian, and New Zealand crews. This second volume covers the breakout from Normandy, the advance across the Low Countries, and the German ripostes in the Ardennes and Operation 'Bodenplatte' in the winter that followed.

    Image of North American P-51 Mustang - Warbird Tech Vol. 5

    North American P-51 Mustang - Warbird Tech Vol. 5

    Frederick A Johnsen

    The WarbirdTech series is the first new, innovative look at military aircraft to arrive in the marketplace in the last fifteen years. Individual volumes in this series provide a first-ever "layman's technical" analysis and review of the world's most exciting combat aircraft. Included are photos, drawings and excerpts from previously "secret" and "restricted" technical manuals produced by the government and the aircraft manufacturers. Included are vintage photos of aircraft during prototype and manufacturing stages, exploded views, cutaways and phantom drawings form tech manuals, disassembled aircraft, rare variants and experimental models etc. Special emphasis is placed on the unique and ground-breaking design and performance aspects of each aircraft.

    This series is for the enthusiast who has read all the combat stories, seen all the camouflage and markings books and now wants to learn the fascinating technical details behind the design and performance of combat aircraft.

    Image of German Jets Versus the U.S. Army Air Force: Battle for the Skies over Europe

    German Jets Versus the U.S. Army Air Force: Battle for the Skies over Europe

    William Hess

    Through first-hand interviews with German and American pilots and analysis of air combat reports, Hess addresses this critical period as he recounts the new jets strengths and weaknesses, Allied counter tactics, German blunders, and stories of the first-ever prop versus jet air combat. Includes coverage of Adolf Gallands jet units, the Me 163 and 262, and the Arado 234.

    Image of The Flypast Book of the P-51 Mustang

    The FlyPast Book of the P-51 Mustang

    Robert Rudhall

    During WWII the Mustang was to the Americans what the Spitfire was to the British-a symbol of hope and strength. The P-51 fought in almost every theatre of war, in various roles and with great success. When powered by the famed Merlin engine, the P-51 became the supreme long-range escort fighter and was able to fly with the bomber stream all the way to their targets and back to base. Today well over 100 Mustangs survive in airworthy condition, this total increasing year by year as airframes are lovingly restored and take to the skies again.

    Image of Warbirds of WW2 (Enthusiast Color)

    Warbirds of WW2 (Enthusiast Color)

    Jeffrey L Ethell

    The most recognizable and popular American fighter planes from World War II are featured in this colorful package. P-38 Lightning, P-40 Warhawk, and P-51 Mustang combine in this value priced

    Image of The Warlords Volume 1: The 4th, 20th & 55th Fighter Groups (Warlords (Specialty Press))

    The Warlords Volume 1: The 4th, 20th & 55th Fighter Groups

    Barry & Ann Money

    Intended to be the first of a series of books which will illustrate, in color, every U.S. Eighth Air Force fighter aircraft of World War II for which photographic evidence can be found. Not just the machines of the well-known aces, but all the other aircraft used by pilots who did their duty but did not get the glory.Aimed primarily at modelers, this first volume has over 500 highly accurate color profiles of the aircraft of the 4th, 20th and 55th Fighter Groups, arranged by squadron and cross-indexed to pilot and type. Black and white photos support the artwork, to show something of the reality of the times, and, in a small way, act as a tribute to those men who fought largely unrecognized.

    Image of Red Tail Captured, Red Tail Free: Memoirs of a Tuskegee Airman and POW

    Red Tail Captured, Red Tail Free: Memoirs of a Tuskegee Airman and POW

    Alexander Jefferson

    This book is a rare and important gift. One of the few memoirs of combat in World War II by a distinguished African-American flier, it is also perhaps the only account of the African-American experience in a German prison camp.Alexander Jefferson was one of 32 Tuskegee Airmen from the 332nd Fighter Group to be shot down defending a country that considered them to be second-class citizens. A Detroit native, Jefferson enlisted in 1942, trained at Tuskegee Institute, Alabama, became a second lieutenant in 1943, and joined one of the mostdecorated fighting units in the War, flying P51s with their legendary-and feared -red tails.Based in Italy, Jefferson flew bomber escort missions over southern Europe before being shot down in France in 1944. Captured, he spent the balance of the war in Luftwaffe prison camps in Sagan and Moosberg, Germany.In this vividly detailed, deeply personal book, Jefferson writes as a genuine American hero and patriot. It's an unvarnished look at life behind barbed wire- and what it meant to be an African-American pilot in enemy hands. It's also a look at race and democracy in America through the eyes of a patriot who fought toprotect the promise of freedom.The book features the sketches, drawings, and other illustrations Jefferson created during his nine months as a kriegie(POW) and Lewis Carlson's authoritative background to the man, his unit, and the fight Alexander Jefferson fought so well.

    Image of Spitfire Wingman from Tennessee

    Spitfire Wingman from Tennessee

    James R Haun

    Climb into the cockpit of an 80-year aviation adventure, told by the bold character who lived it. More than the memoir of an aerobatic master born to fling his body through cloudbanks, Spitfire Wingman from Tennessee offers a unique bird's-eye perspective on events and personalities of WWII and the Cold War. His desire to fly fighters won him a stint as famed New Zealand ace Johnny Checketts' wingman. Personal encounters with Patton, Vandenberg, Yeager, Truman and Nixon are replayed with perception and wit. While jockeying P-40s, P-51s, and P-47s, he was privileged to see the war both from twenty thousand feet and as Staff Officer at 9th Air Force Headquarters in Brussels, where he watched 'the Brass' play chess with armies on two world fronts. A stripped-down Thunderbolt fighter-bomber became his personal 400-mph runabout.
    Beginning with fragile fabric-covered biplanes, the Colonel bears hands-on nostalgic witness to historic transformations steering manned flight from art toward automated science. Starting out as the Memphis 'Boy Wonder' who built his first airplane in 1933 by adapting a motorcycle engine, this gifted flyer takes you on an intimate inside journey from barnstormer to dog-fighter, to threading the Himalayan 'Hump,' to Berlin Airlift commander, then on to Presidential Squadron leader - finally becoming Chief Pilot of the Military Air Transport Service. Balancing dry humor with just enough technical detail to please aviation buffs, this self-revealing autobiography thunders on all twelve cylinders with sky-sweeping appeal.

    Image of The U.S. 86th Fighter Group in WWII: 1942-1945

    86th Fighter Group in World War 2 1942-1945

    Steve Luce

    This volume is the commemoration of the sacrifices and dedication of a group of extremely courageous, though largely unheralded young men who volunteered to answer a call, and to prosecute to its finish, in a manner up close and very personal, a war not of their making so as to make the world free of tyranny and a safer, better place in which to live. Written by Steve Luce, the son of one of the members of the 86th, their story is presented by over 225 photographs from the veterans, most never before published and with personal stories about their war experiences. This is the story of the men and machines of the 86th Fighter-Bomber Group, 12th Air Force. The 86th was operationally assigned only two aircraft during WW II. From their combat debut in early July, 1943, out of Korba, Tunisia and later based out of Italy, until the summer of 1944 they flew the North American A-36 Apache or Invader. They also flew a small number of the straight P-51, the cannon-armed version of the same airframe, for pinpoint demolition work where the Browning .50 caliber weapon, of which the A-36 carried six, was considered too light, and bombs were considered too inaccurate. From the summer of 1944 until VE-Day they flew the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt. In the interim between official assignments, they filled in with P-40s.

    Image of The Pioneer Mustang Group: The 354th Fighter Group in World War II

    The Pioneer Mustang Group: The 354th Fighter Group in World War II

    Steve Blake

    As the first unit to fly the Merlin-engined P-51B in combat, the 354th Fighter Group adopted the nickname "Pioneer Mustang Group." Until D-Day, it escorted 8th AF heavy bombers to targets on the European Continent. The group then moved to France and supported Patton's Third Army from Normandy to Bavaria, and also participated in the Battle of the Bulge. Its pilots scored over 600 confirmed air victories, and forty-three of them became aces. This book is an almost day-to-day account of their aerial combat experiences and the "gypsy" lifestyle they and their support personnel led as they moved from one airfield to another across Western Europe.

    Image of Mustang Ace

    Mustang Ace

    Robert J Goebel

    MUSTANG ACE Memoirs of a P-51 Fighter Pilot by Robert J. Goebel When Robert Goebel left home to join the Army Air Corps in 1942, he was a 19 years old and a high-school graduate. The only previous time he had traveled far from his native Racine, Wisconsin, was an epic trip in the summer of 1940, when he and a pal had ridden the rails to Texas and back to visit two of Bob's brothers who were in the service. Even during his weeks in Pre-flight training, young Goebel found that he felt at home in the service, and he looked forward to the great adventure on which he had embarked out of a sense of patriotism and yearning to see the wide world. Easygoing and quick to learn, Cadet Goebel worked his way steadily through the Basic, Primary, and Advanced phases of military flight training, and found in himself an aptitude for flight. However, like nearly all of his comrades, Goebel could not learn how to hit a flying target with the guns mounted on the trainers he flew. Nevertheless, he-and they-graduated to fighter school and, after earning their wings and commissions, were sent on to join an operational fighter unit - in Panama. The months of rigorous operational flying in Panama seasoned Lieutenant Goebel and his young companions, and made better aviators of them, but it did little to advance their gunnery skills. When a new crop of novices arrived, Goebel and his companions found themselves on their way to Europe to join the fight. They wound up in North Africa in the Spring of 1944 with orders to join the 31st Fighter Group in Italy. Just as Goebel and his young companions were about to join the leading fighter group in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations, the 31st turned in its British-made Spitfire fighters for new P-51 Mustang fighters. Within weeks, Bob Goebel had flown his first combat missions and had lost his element leader, who was shot down in a swirling dogfight. But master the job he did. A steady succession of bomber-escort missions over southeastern Europe slowly and then more rapidly forced Lieutenant Goebel to settle in and master aerial gunnery and the mentally taxing high-speed dogfights in which he became engaged. At last, he shot down his first German fighter. And he advanced to positions of leadership, in due course leading the entire 31st Fighter Group deep into enemy territory. At length, he shot down a fifth German and thus became an ace-a Mustang Ace. And then he shot down three Germans in one day on a mission to Ploesti, Rumania. He flew to Russia and back, and supported the invasion of southern France. In the end, by September 1944, he had eleven confirmed victories to his credit and was one of the 308th Fighter Squadron's most respected combat leaders. When he was sent home at the end of his combat tour, Captain Bob Goebel was not yet 22 years old.

    Image of 359th Fighter Group (Osprey Aviation Elite 10)

    359th Fighter Group (Osprey Aviation Elite 10)

    Jack H Smith

    Nicknamed the 'Unicorns', the 359th FG was one of the last groups to arrive in the UK for service in the ETO with the Eighth Air Force. First seeing action on 13 December 1943, the group initially flew bomber escort sweeps in P-47s, before converting to the ubiquitous P-51 in March/April 1944. Throughout its time in the ETO, the 359th was credited with the destruction of 351 enemy aircraft destroyed between December 1943 and May 1945. The exploits of all 12 aces created by the group are detailed, along with the most significant missions flown. This book also discusses the various markings worn by the group's three squadrons, the 368th, 369th and 370th FSs

    Image of 354th Fighter Group (Osprey Aviation Elite 7)

    354th Fighter Group (Osprey Aviation Elite 7)

    William Hess

    ‘I think the success of the 354th as the leading group in the European theatre for aerial victories is due to several things. First was the initial training of the squadrons before deployment to England. Colonel Ken Martin nurtured the group from its infancy, and all the excellence that later showed through could be placed at his doorstep. Despite his youth, he knew how to foster teamwork and demand perfection in flying. There was nothing more important than getting the group off on the right foot. Second, our pilots were taught to fly mutual support, and practised it faithfully. There were no "hot" pilots in the 354th, only "excellent" pilots. Third, men like Glenn Eagleston gave advice and warnings about combat tactics and guarding one's tail. This prepared our pilots for lurking dangers, something the other groups may not have done.’ Brigadier General James Howard, Commanding Officer of the 354th Fighter Group

    Image of 352nd Fighter Group (Osprey Aviation Elite 8)

    352nd Fighter Group (Osprey Aviation Elite 8)

    Tom Ivie

    Nicknamed the ‘Bluenosed Bastards of Bodney’ due to the garish all-blue noses of their P-51s, the 352nd FG was one of the most successful fighter groups in the Eighth Air Force. Credited with destroying almost 800 enemy aircraft between 1943 and 1945, the 352nd finished fourth in the ranking of all groups within VIII Fighter Command. Initially equipped with P-47s, the group transitioned to P-51s in the spring of 1944, and it was with the Mustang that its pilots enjoyed their greatest success. Numerous first-hand accounts, 55 newly commissioned artworks and 140+ photos complete this concise history of the ‘Bluenosers’.

    Image of In A Now Forgotten Sky: The 31st Fighter Group in WWII

    In a Now Forgotten Sky: The 31st Fighter Group in WW2

    Dennis C Kucera

    The first commercial history of the 31st Fighter Group, the highest-scoring fighter group in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations.

    Image of One Down, One Dead: The personal adventures of two Fourth Fighter Group combat pilots as they face the Luftwaffe over Germany

    One Down, One Dead: The personal adventures of two Fourth Fighter Group combat pilots as they face the Luftwaffe over Germany

    Frank Speer

    Two WWII fighter pilots, raised on different continents and trained in different countries, fight life or death combat with the Luftwaffe over Europe. They flew P-51 Mustangs in the 4th Fighter Group and contributed to the Group score of a record 1000-plus enemy planes destroyed, the highest total of any Allied Group. They became Aces within a day of each other; then one was killed in combat on D-Day, while the other, having been shot down, trekked across northern Germany in a futile effort to evade capture.

    He is finally captured and as a POW, is forced to participate in a "Death March." After several unsuccessful attempts, he and a fellow POW finally escape. Leading a handful of French forced-laborers they capture 25 German soldiers, turn them over to Patton's advancing Third Army and eventually return to the U.S. by hospital ship.

    Image of P-51 Mustang: Development of the Long-Range Escort Fighter

    P-51 Mustang: Development of the Long-Range Escort Fighter

    Paul A Ludwig

    Not just another book on the P-51 Mustang, this detailed and controversial book forms an investigative analysis into the often - and little-known - troubled design and development history of America's premier piston-engined fighter aircraft. Supported by hundreds of rare photos and superb color artwork, author Paul Ludwig weaves a carefully crafted story.

    Image of On Special Missions: The Luftwaffe's Research and Experimental Squadrons 1923-1945 (Air War Classics)

    On Special Missions: The Luftwaffe's Research and Experimental Squadrons 1923-1945 (Air War Classics)

    J Richard Smith

    This is the remarkable story of the Verschuchsverband, the Trials and Research Unit of the Luftwaffe High Command, one of the most intriguing, clandestine and rarely-covered elements of the Luftwaffe before and during World War 2. Using previously unpublished recollections from pilots who flew secret, long-range reconnaissance and spy-dropping missions over England, Iraq, Poland and the USSR, as well as hundreds of rare and fascinating photographs, the book recounts the history, operations and aircraft of the unit. Among the unit's many tasks, it was charged with testing and introducing newly developed reconnaissance, bomber and nightfighter aircraft into operational service. These aircraft include 'exotic' types such as the Ar 234 jet, the huge Do 335 fighter and extreme high-altitude Ju 86R.

    Image of 2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 1: Spartan to Normandy, June 1943 to June 1944

    2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 1: Spartan to Normandy, June 1943 to June 1944

    Christopher Shores

    The 2nd TAF, equipped with rocket- and bomb-carrying Typhoons, Tempests, Spitfires, Mosquitos, Mustangs and medium bombers, flew ground attack and tank-busting missions in support of Montgomery's 21st Army Group as it advanced through Normandy and north-west Europe in 1944-45. The medium bomber units struck at enemy transport, ammunition dumps and communication targets. The 2nd TAF comprised British, Canadian, Polish, Czech, Norwegian, French, South African, Australian and New Zealand crews. The first volume in this three-book set deals with the formation and expansion of 2nd TAF from its inception in June 1943 for the next 12 months, and with the initial critical month of the invasion. This volume, as with the two subsequent volumes, is not only profusely illustrated with many little known photographs, and with Chris Thomas's masterly artwork, but also contains daily listings of all claims made against enemy aircraft, and all losses, damage and casualties suffered by 2nd Tactical aircraft and aircrews in carrying out their arduous duties.

    Image of Spitfires and Yellow Tail Mustangs: The 52nd Fighter Group in World War II

    Spitfires and Yellow Tail Mustangs: The 52nd Fighter Group in World War II

    Tom Ivie

    The USAAF 52nd Fighter Group enjoyed an outstanding record in World War II, but to date its story has never been told. Activated in January 1941, it moved to England in July 1942 for an assignment with the Eighth Air Force. It flew combat missions in Spitfires to France during the summer of 1942 before being reassigned to the invasion force attacking North Africa in November 1942. After moving to North Africa, it was assigned to the Twelfth Air Force and was again equipped with Spitfires. As part of the Twelfth Air Force, it flew combat missions in the Tunisian campaign, and during the invasion of Sicily. In mid-1944, the 52nd was reassigned to the Fifteenth Air Force and converted to P-51 Mustangs. During the remainder of the war, it flew bomber escort and strafing missions to targets in Italy, France, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Hungary, Rumania, and Yugoslavia. For its outstanding service the Group was twice awarded the Distinguished Unit Citation. During its long campaign, the Group destroyed more than 425 enemy aircraft in aerial combat and damaged 135 plus many more on the ground. The 52nd Fighter Group produced 21 Aces.

    Image of Flying to the Limit: Testing World War II Single-Engined Fighters

    FLYING TO THE LIMIT: Testing World War II Single-engined Fighter Aircraft

    Peter Caygill

    During the years preceding and during World War II, the RAF and the Royal Aircraft Establishment were responsible for the selection and procurement of British military aircraft and also to evaluate their capabilities against captured enemy models whenever possible. During the lend-lease agreement with the USA, the RAF and Fleet Air Arm operated several American designs, each of which was tested to evaluate its potential. This book looks at the key area of fighter aircraft and includes the test results and pilot's own first-hand accounts of flying seventeen different models that were designed in the UK, America and Germany. The reader will learn of the possibilities of air superiority offered by these types and also their weaknesses. Types included are The Hawker Hurricane, Supermarine Spitfire, Boulton Paul Defiant, Hawker Tempest and Typhoon, Messerschmitt Bf 109, Focke-Wulf Fw 190, Brewster Buffalo, Curtiss Mohawk, Bell Airacobra, Curtiss Tomahawk, Curtiss Kittyhawk, North American Mustang, Grumman Martlet, Republic Thunderbolt, Grumman Hellcat and Vought Corsair. All aircraft that saw a great deal of action throughout the War and which are now part of legend.

    Image of By the Skin of My Teeth: Flying Raf Spitfires and Mustangs in World War II And USAF Sabre Jets in the Korean War

    BY THE SKIN OF MY TEETH: The Memoirs of an RAF Mustang Pilot in World War II and of Flying Sabres with USAF in Korea

    Colin Downes

    This is a memoir of flying with the Royal Air Force in war and peace during a career in military and civil aviation covering a half century. The text is filled with personal experiences, reminiscences and impressions and is written in four parts. Part One covers the years leading to the author's graduation and the winning of his RAF Wings. This is followed by action-packed stories of flying propeller-driven fighters, Spitfires and Mustangs, during and just after the Second World War. The author then tells of his unique experiences of front-line fighter operations when he flew jets with the United States Air Force during the Korean War. The final chapter covers the remainder of his RAF Service flying until retirement.

    Image of Two-Man Air Force

    TWO-MAN AIR FORCE: Don Gentile and John Godfrey: World War II Flying Legends (Pen & Sword Aviation)

    Philip Kaplan

    American volunteers Don Gentile (pronounced Jen-tilly) and John Godfrey flew together as leader and wingman respectively, with the USAAF 4th Fighter Group based at Debden near Cambridge in England. At the end of their missions with the 4th the two of them had accounted for over 58 enemy aircraft destroyed. Major Gentile had scored 22 air and 6 ground kills before he was returned to the USA to help raise money for the war effort. Major Godfrey was credited with 18 air and 12 ground kills before he was shot down and taken prisoner of war. This is the story of their amazing adventures and wartime partnership from their basic training in Canada and then onto England where they first flew the Supermarine Spitfire. It continues with their transfer to the USAAF 4th Fighter Group when the US entered the war and when the two were retrained to fly the P-47 Thunderbolt and eventually the superb P-51 Mustang. These two ace pilots loved life as much as flying - and as well as being hell-bent on destroying the enemy in the skies of Europe they also lived life to the full in their off-duty time in England.

    Image of 2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 3: From the Rhine to Victory, January to May 1945

    2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 3: From the Rhine to Victory, January to May 1945

    Christopher Shores

    It is more than 30 years since the original and highly-acclaimed history of 2nd Tactical Air Force was first published, and it has been long out of print. Now at last, a completely rewritten and greatly expanded account of this important command's vital contribution to the Invasion of Normandy and the defeat of the forces of the Third Reich in Western Europe has been prepared. The 2nd TAF, equipped with rocket- and bomb-carrying Typhoons, Tempests, Spitfires, Mosquitos, Mustangs, and medium bombers, flew ground attack and tank-busting missions in support of Montgomery's 21st Army Group as it advanced through Normandy and northwest Europe in 1944-45. The medium bomber units struck at enemy transport, ammunition dumps, and communication targets. The 2nd TAF comprized British, Canadian, Polish, Czech, Norwegian, French, South African, Australian, and New Zealand crews.

    Image of Latin American Air Wars 1912-1969

    Latin American Air Wars 1912-1969

    Dan Hagedorn

    The aircraft were colorful and their crews were often courageous - but virtually unknown beyond the South American Continent. With drawings and a detailed text this volume offers a remarkable historical bonanza for students of aeronautical history and aircraft modellers craving something new.

    Image of 332nd Fighter Group - Tuskegee Airmen (Aviation Elite Units)

    332nd Fighter Group - Tuskegee Airmen (Aviation Elite Units)

    Chris Bucholtz

    The USAAC's Tuskegee Experiment, designed to prove that African-Americans were not capable of flying combat aircraft, ironically resulted in the creation of one of the USAAF's elite units.

    Crewed by highly-educated and exceptionally motivated men, the 99th Fighter Squadron, led by Col Benjamin O. Davis (later joined by the 100th, 301st, and 302nd FS to form the 332nd Fighter Group), first flew ground attack missions in P-40s in North Africa and participated in the destruction and surrender of Pantelleria, off Sicily. Later, after the unit was equipped with P-51 Mustangs, the 'Redtails' began flying escort missions deep into Germany.

    The unit scoreboard boasted 111 aerial kills (including several Me 262 jets), 150 strafing victories, 950 vehicles and railway rolling stock destroyed, and the sinking of a German destroyer by war's end. The group were both feared and respected by the Germans, who called them the "Schwartze Voglemenschen" (Black Birdmen), and revered by others as the "Black Red-tail Angels", partly because of their distinct red-tailed aircraft, and partly because they never lost a bomber under escort to enemy attack (a feat which was unmatched by any other USAAF fighter group in World War II). The pilots of the 332nd FG attribute their success to the discipline instilled by Col Davis, who is reputed to have told them, 'If you lose a bomber, don't bother to come back.'

    This book will reveal the true story of the unit who rose above discrimination to achieve elite status.

    Image of Diver! Diver! Diver!: RAF and American Fighter Pilots Battle the V-1 Assault Over South-East England 1944-45

    Diver! Diver! Diver!: RAF and American Fighter Pilots Battle the V-1 Assault Over South-East England 1944-45

    Brian Cull

    During the summer months of 1944, a daily onslaught by V-1 jet-propelled flying bombs, heading for London and southern England, was countered in the skies of Kent and Sussex.

    To the pilots, British press, and bewildered public, Hitler's 'secret weapons' became known variously as Divers, Buzz Bombs, Flying Bombs, Doodlebugs, Dingbats, Robots, Jet-Ships, P-Planes, Witches and even Farting Furies. But they were dangerous, with thousands of civilians losing their lives.

    Launched from the Pas de Calais in France, the V-1s came in over the Channel at between 1,000 and 2,000 feet at speeds approaching 400 mph. They proved a difficult target to intercept, much less to bring down. However, many fighter pilots did become 'aces', one alone accounting for 60 of them. By March 1945, when the aerial bombardment ended, a staggering 10,000 V-1s had been launched (including 1,500 from the air). However, with 42 per cent being destroyed by the defenses, half of these alone by the RAF, it is clear tens of thousands of people were saved.

    In this significant work, respected historians detail every known success by the defending pilots of over 13 nationalities, and where detected, record all locations and casualties of V-1 impacts in London and the south east. In doing so, they rely heavily not only on official documents and combat reports, but also on the vital accounts of the pilots themselves and those on the ground, many of which are quoted verbatim.

    Image of 4th Fighter Group - Debden Eagles (Aviation Elite Units)

    4th Fighter Group - Debden Eagles (Aviation Elite Units)

    Chris Bucholtz

    Formed around a nucleus of pilots already seasoned by their experience as volunteers in the RAF's Eagle Squadrons, the 4th Fighter Group was established in England in October 1942. Initially flying Spitfires, the Debden Eagles went on to fly the P-47 and P-51, becoming in July 1943, the first Eighth Air Force fighter group to penetrate German air space. The group's record of 583 air and 469 ground victories was unmatched in the Eighth Air Force, and the group produced a cast of characters that included legendary aces Don Blakeslee, Pierce McKennon, 'Kid' Hofer, Duane Beeson, Steve Pisanos and Howard Hively.

    While primarily a bomber escort group, the 4th also played roles in supporting the D-Day landings, Operation Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge and the crossing of the Rhine. The group's achievements came at a price, however, for 248 aircraft were lost in combat, with 125 pilots killed in action and 105 being taken prisoner - a 42 percent casualty rate. Packed with first hand accounts, detailed aircraft profiles and full combat histories, this book is an intriguing insight into the best-known American fighter unit in World War 2.

    Image of UPWARD AND ONWARD: LIFE OF AIR VICE-MARSHAL JOHN HOWE CB, CBE, AFC

    UPWARD AND ONWARD: LIFE OF AIR VICE-MARSHAL JOHN HOWE CB, CBE, AFC

    Bob Cossey

    John Howe started his flying career in the postwar South African Air Force, learning to fly on Tiger Moths, Harvards and Spitfires. He was posted to No 2 Squadron SAAF and sent to Korea to fly with South Africa's contribution to the war in support of the UN forces. There he flew the Mustang F-51D fighter-bombers in front-line action during his first tour. A second tour saw him with the US Infantry as a Forward Air Controller operating on the ground.

    As the political situation in South Africa became more extreme he resigned from the SAAF and came to England where he was asked by the RAF to fly their first jet fighters and later instruct on Vampires, converting later to the Hunter and joined 222 Squadron at Leuchars. During the Suez crisis he again operated as a Forward Ground Controller and landed on the beaches with 40 Commando. He was appointed CO of 74 'Tiger' Squadron to introduce the supersonic Lightning into service with the RAF. Traveling extensively, demonstrating the remarkable capabilities of the new fighter. His late career took him to Fighter Command's HQ, RAF Staff College and the Joint Warfare School. After a posting to the USA on an exchange tour flying most of the Century Series Fighters and the Phantom he returned to the UK to head up 228 OCU to introduce the Phantom FGR2 into operational service.

    Towards the end of his 44 year service career he commanded the RAF base at Gutersloh on the front line of the Iron Curtain flying and his final posting was Commandant of the RAF Regiment

    Image of 479th Fighter Group: Riddle's Raiders (Aviation Elite Units)

    479th Fighter Group: Riddle's Raiders (Aviation Elite Units)

    John C Stanaway

    Formed in October 1943, the 479th FG claimed an impressive history against the Luftwaffe during the final year of the war. Originally flying P-38s, the 479th's pilots had a fierce pride of arms. They earned a Presidential Distinguished Unit Citation in the late summer of 1944 and were also credited with the USAAF's first German jet kill in July 1944. Eventually transitioning to the P-51D in September 1944, the 479th excelled with the Mustang. The 479th FG was credited with scoring the last aerial victory claimed by the Eighth Air Force's VIII Fighter Command, on 25 April 1945. By VE-Day, 29 pilots flying in the group had earned ace status.

    Image of FIGHTER BASES OF WW2 US 8TH ARMY AIR FORCE FIGHTER COMMAND USAAF 1943-45: P-38 Lightning, P-47 Thunderbolt and P-51 Mustang Squadrons in East Anglia, ... Northamptonshire (Aviation Heritage Trail)

    FIGHTER BASES OF WW2 US 8TH ARMY AIR FORCE FIGHTER COMMAND USAAF 1943-45: P-38 Lightning, P-47 Thunderbolt and P-51 Mustang Squadrons in East Anglia, Cambridgeshire ... Northamptonshire (Aviation Heritage Trail)

    Martin W Bowman

    This book covers the bases used during the Second World War by the American fighter units that flew in support of the 8th Air Force's heavy bomber forces.

    The long-range Lightnings, Thunderbolts and Mustangs escorted the Mighty Eighth's Flying Fortresses and Liberators on their deep penetration raids into occupied Europe and Germany. Fighter cover was vital, since the USAAF flew daylight raids and in the early months the number of US aircraft lost to the defending Luftwuffe fighters was unacceptably high.

    The airfields included are Bodney, Bottisham, Boxted, Debden, Duxford, East Wretham, Fowlmere, Halesworth, Honington, Horsham St. Faith, King's Cliffe, Leiston, Martlesham Heath, Raydon, Steeple Morden, Wattisham and Wormingford.

    This book looks at the history and personalities associated with each base, what remains today and explores the favorite local wartime haunts where aircrew and ground crew would have sought well-deserved entertainment and relaxation. Other museums and places that are relevant will also be described and general directions on how to get them included.

    Image of DIEPPE: THE GREATEST AIR BATTLE

    DIEPPE: THE GREATEST AIR BATTLE

    Norman Franks

    When Canadian troops and British Commandos made their now famous 'reconnaissance in force' against the harbor town of Dieppe on 19th August 1942, they were supported and protected by the largest array of Royal Air Force aircraft ever seen in WWII until that time. Air Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory, AOC of Fighter Command's No.11 Group, was given command of the air operation and had 46 Spitfire, 8 Hurricane, 3 Typhoon and 4 Mustang Squadrons under his direction, as well as 7 Boston and Blenheim squadrons of 2 Group and Fighter Command. On 19th August Leigh-Mallory commanded more squadrons than were available to Air Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding at any one time during the Battle of Britain two years previously.This book provides a detailed, minute by minute, hour by hour, blow by blow account of operations on a day which has become accepted as the one on which the Royal Air Force fought its greatest air battle. The RAF flew nearly 3,000 sorties: the Luftwaffe 945, Air combat, ground attacks, bombing and smoke laying missions cost the RAF over 100 aircraft and the Luftwaffe nearly 50. All this happened in just 16 hours.In addition to the in-depth research into the RAF's activities on this August day 68 years ago, there are also many personal accounts from pilots who took part adding color to the story of this unique battle in the history of the Royal Air Force. Norman Franks is a full time author and air historian, with several books on WWI and WWII published by Grub Street.

    Image of Building the P-51 Mustang: The Story of Manufacturing North American's Legendary World War II Fighter in Original Photos (Specialty Press)

    Building the P-51 Mustang: The Story of Manufacturing North American's Legendary World War II Fighter in Original Photos (Specialty Press)

    Michael O'Leary

    The P-51 Mustang holds a fascination unlike any other World War II aircraft, and countless books have been written about nearly every aspect of the Mustang's colorful history. However, the story of manufacturing the airplane itself is usually contained only in the opening chapters of these books. Now, for the first time, here is a major work devoted strictly to telling the story of how this legendary airplane was designed and built using rare original factory photographs, documents, and unique engineering information. The author uses more than 300 original photos culled from his personal archive of official factory and USAAF images, many of which have never before been seen in any publication whatsoever. This book will provide a vital missing link in the saga of this famed World War II aircraft, and is sure to become a valued addition to the libraries of P-51 modelers, historians, enthusiasts, and pilots in both the United States and England.

    NORTH AMERICAN P-51 MUSTANG, THE: Part 2

    Dana Bell

    More details will be available on this exciting new title soon.

    Fighters In Transition

    Volume 29, Issue 08, 2001, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Peter Carmichael , Robert F Dorr

    Marking the 50th anniversary ot the Korean War — and 49 years since Fleet Air Arm Sea Fury pilot Lt Peter "Hoagy"'Carmichael shot down a MiG-15 — Robert F. Dorr examines prop-versus-jet air combat in Part Two of his series

    Preservation Profile

    Volume 30, Issue 11, 2002, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Frank B Mormillo

    It's back! A concise history of a very unusual North American Mustang, by Frank B. Mormillo

    Blue-Nosed Bastard

    Volume 30, Issue 10, 2002, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Richard Paver photographs a very historic Mustang over Duxford and Bassingboum

    Personal Album

    Volume 29, Issue 08, 2001, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    World War Two RAF Mustangs and Typhoons — and derelict Luftwaffe types

    A New Life For The Red Racer

    Volume 29, Issue 07, 2001, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Polished and perfect, Kermit Weeks's recently-restored rare North American P-51C Mustang was once a Bendix Trophy racer.

    Morgan'S Machines

    Volume 27, Issue 07, 1999, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Richard Paver flies air-to-air photographic sorties witli collector Paul Morgan's Sea Fury and newly-repainted Mustang

    American Friends

    Volume 27, Issue 05, 1999, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Jerry Scutts

    Jerry Scutts looks back at the exploits of USAAF Mustangs in the UK during World War Two

    We Can Build You A Better Airplane Than The P-40

    Volume 27, Issue 05, 1999, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Lee Atwood

    The late Lee Atwood, vice-president of North American in 1940, describes the aerodynamic advantages which helped him sell the Mustang to the RAF

    From Warrior To Warbird

    Volume 27, Issue 05, 1999, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Michael O'Leary

    Michael O'Leary examines the Mustang's transition from military fighter to private-owner's treasure

    Keep It Simple

    Volume 27, Issue 05, 1999, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Michael O'Leary

    Robustness and simplicity was the key to the P-51's success, says Michael O'Leary, who traces the Mustang's origins

    Astronaut'S Delight

    Volume 26, Issue 02, 1998, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Frank Borman

    Former test pilot and astronaut Frank Borman is over the moon about his immaculate Mustang trainer, described and photographed by Frank Mormillo

    Preservation Profile

    Volume 23, Issue 12, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Richard Paver delves into the history of Paul Morgan's P-51 D Mustang, G-SUSY

    Preservation profile

    Volume 22, Issue 11, 1994, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Richard Paver

    Richard Paver recounts the life story of the Dutch Historic Aircraft Company's P-51 D Mustang Damn Yankee

    Mustangs in miniature

    Volume 22, Issue 05, 1994, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Master modeller Peter Cooke explains how he achieves the ultimate accuracy with his scale models of the P-51 D

    Tangmere Summer

    Volume 21, Issue 09, 1993, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Roland Beamont

    Roland Beamont recalls testing the P-51 D and the Bf 109 with the CFE's Tactics Branch in 1945

    Preservation profile

    Volume 14, Issue 06, 1986, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    History of the P-51D Mustang 45-1 1582 currently owned and flown by The Air Museum at Chino Airport in Southern California

    Shangri-La

    Volume 10, Issue 02, 1982, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Michael O'Leary

    Michael O'Leary tells how the last remaining airworthy P-51B Mustang was put together in the USA

    On the beach

    Volume 9, Issue 10, 1981, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    The resurrection of a P-51D Mustang from a beach in France

    Mustang masterpiece

    Volume 41 Issue 11, 2008, Aircraft illustrated

    Is P-51D Happy Jack’s Go Buggy the finest Mustang restoration ever? We go air-to-air

    Cover Photo / Article

    Volume 33 Issue 08, 2000, Aircraft illustrated

    The Right Stuff - holding the sticks are none other than Gen 'Chuck' Yeager and Col Bud Anderson - At first it appears to be 'just' two Mustangs in formation. Now look closely

    Full Metal Jacket

    Volume 33 Issue 04, 2000, Aircraft illustrated

    There are few finer sights in aviation than a Mustang in full flight. And there are few finer air-to-air images than this month's centrespread!

    Mustang Rodeo

    Volume 32 Issue 06, 1999, Aircraft illustrated

    Peter R March

    Peter R. March puts on the sun block and heads stateside to capture the action from the Mustang Gathering in Kissimmee, Fl. Photography by the author and John Dibbs

    THE ALLISON MUSTANGS - PART TWO

    Volume 16, Issue 10, 1980, Air Classics

    Part Two of the combat history of the least-known Mustangs

    C.A.C's Piston Engined Fighters

    Volume 17, Issue 2, March 2010, Classic Wings Magazine

    Craig Justo was fortunate enough to capture a significant formation in Australian skies when an Australian built Wirraway, Boomerang and Mustang got together for a unique photo opportunity. Following an overview of the history of these types produced at the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation

    Cart Horses - TT Mustangs

    Volume 16, Issue 4, August 2009, Classic Wings Magazine

    Among the more obscure Mustang variants are the airframes that were modified for use as target tugs. Although widely used by many air forces they are rarely photographed; most references ignore them completely. The biggest operator appears to have been the USAAF/USAF (and the Air National Guard) with smaller numbers used by the Italian Air Force, the RAF, the RCAF, and locally by the RAAF, the RNZAF and a civilian contractor in Australia. David Muir, author of

    P-51 Dove of Peace

    Volume 12, Issue 2, March 2005, Classic Wings Magazine

    Imported into New Zealand by Robert Borrius Broek, this P-51 has recently flown at its new home at Wanaka. We look at the aircraft's history from its shipment to Australia, return to the U.S. for rebuild and include not only historic photos, but some stunning air to air shots of it over the spectacular Alpine scenery.

    Square One Aviation

    Volume 11, Issue 3, May 2004, Classic Wings Magazine

    Having built a reputation of unrivaled excellence in the rebuild and restoration of P-51 Mustangs, Square One has recently moved in a new direction. Purchased from long time owner Elmer Ward by Ross Anderson, the Company will now offer P-51 major sub assemblies and parts to the market place. This move has seen the immediate availability of selected cowl formers, engine mounts and main fuselage longerons. In the near future wing and fuselage fillet sets will also be available for customers rebuilding aircraft on their own premises. This is a marked change in philosophy, previously all work carried out was specifically directed at aircraft being worked on in the Square One workshop.

    STOP PRESS. It is with great sadness that we record the tragic death of Ross Anderson in the crash of his Harmon Rocket on July 7th. Our thoughts are with his family, friends and staff at Square One.

    Allison Powered

    Volume 7, Issue 4, September 2000, Classic Wings Magazine

    The Allison V-1710 engine was a liquid-cooled V-12 engine of considerable importance to the Allied defense and operations in the SW Pacific Theater.

    In its various models it powered many aircraft used in the Theater, including the Lockheed P-38, Bell P-39/P-400, Curtiss P-40, and North American P-51A Mustang.

    As with the Rolls Royce "Merlin" liquid-cooled V-12, the V-1710 is more than a single engine model

    Mammoth Mustang Meet!

    Volume 6, Issue 3, June 1999, Classic Wings Magazine

    Where better to host the all time greatest post-war Mustang gathering, than the home of Stallion '51 where dedication to safe P-51 operations is part of daily business.

    The folks at Kissimmee, Florida had been planning the Gathering of Mustangs and Legends for some time, and there were many ups and downs along the way, particularly in securing suitable sponsorship.

    That the planning and preparation culminated in a type-specific event like no other before it is now a successful page in Warbird History.

    Mustang Survivors Downunder

    Volume 3, Issue 1, January 1996, Classic Wings Magazine

    In the previous article mention is made of the three CAC built Mustangs which have been flying in Australia over the past decade or so. We've been privileged to witness these aeroplanes being displayed at airshows right up and down the East Coast of Australia.

    Considering the period over which this number of operational machines has remained constant it is interesting to reflect on the fact that to date 19 different Australian Mustangs have been allocated civillian call signs, and this doesnt include the ones based over in New Zealand, five at last count.

    Thompson Trophy Racers: The Pilots and Planes of America's Air Racing Glory Days 1929-49

    Huntington R

    Hot homebuilts to stripped, streamlined warbirds, the Thompson Trophy racers are the most fascinating raceplanes ever built.

    Tremendously powerful and looking too stubby to fly, the 1932 Gee Bee R-1 was the hairiest of the home-builts. Few though it was controllable and no one thought it could win. But win it did: piloted by the legendary Jimmy Doolittle, the Gee Bee set records that were not broken until 4 years later.

    Swift, lithe and beautiful, the extensively modified P-51 Beguine was the thoroughbred of warbird racers. With its impressive qualifying speed of 405.6mph and obvious aerodynamic refinement, Beguine was a favourite to win the 1949 Thompson. But it was not to be: the inexperienced pilot crashed in a high-speed turn on lap 2, killing himself and two innocents.

    Thompson Trophy Racers takes you back to experience the high-decibel excitement of the racehorse start, the wingtip-to-wingtip danger ‘round the pylons, the elation of the winners on the...

    Aircraft Profile 100 - The North American P-51B & C Mustang

    Profile Publications Richard Atkins

    "In all some 670 Mustang I and II's were procured by the R.A.F. while 358 model P-51 and P-5lA's were delivered to the U.S.A.A.F. These machines performed satisfactorily in spite of the powerplant deficiencies but they could be classified only fair at best. It required the marriage of the Rolls Royce Merlin engine to the Mustang airframe to create the beginnings of a really great combat airplane.   Life for the P-51 B began in late 1942 in the form of two prototype XP-51 B airplanes identified as A.A.F. serial numbers 41-37352 and 41-37421, equipped with the V-1650-3 engine. The major differences in appearance between the A and B created by the Merlin engine are evident from the firewall forward and in the coolant radiator structure. The carburettor air intake was moved from the top to the bottom of the nose and all nose guns were removed. The coolant radiators were enlarged requiring a deepening of the fuselage in the area of the radiators..."

    Aircraft Profile 8 - North American P-51D Mustang

    Profile Publications Edward Shacklady

    "Of all the fighters that took part in the great conflict that was World War II, perhaps the finest was the North American P-51 Mustang. Pilots swore by this sleek machine that looked right and whose performance outshone the majority of its contempories. That the basic design was fundamentally right can be seen in how the speed increased from the prototypes 382 mph to the final models, the P-51H , 487 mph without too radical change in outline or construction"....

    French Mustangs

    Number 56 , 1989, Wingspan/Planes Magazine

    Alf Granger

    The 51D in service with France's Armee de l'Air is the subject of Richard Ward's colour feature this month, Alf Granger's super-detailed three-view

    Korean Mustangs

    Volume 7 Issue 2, 2005, Combat Aircraft Magazine

    Warren Thompson

    It is well known that the venerable F-51 Mustang gave outstanding service in the Korean War, but its use in the 1950-53 conflict by the Republic of Korea AF has not been documented in much depth - until now! With words and archive photography, Warren E. Thompson fills in the gaps

    Pretty Woman

    Volume 6 Issue 3, 2004, Combat Aircraft Magazine

    Germain S

    Scott Germain/WarbirdAeroPress. Comintroduces Tony Banta's P-51 D Mustang Kimberly Kaye - a first-class rebuild of this classic fighter.

    Adrenaline Rush - Mustangs... but not as we know them!

    Volume 5 Issue 4, 2004, Combat Aircraft Magazine

    Frank B Mormillo , Germain S

    Frank B. Mormillo and Scott Germain attempt to catch up with the new breed of racing P-51s — now smashing the 500mph barrier!

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