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North American F-86 Sabre references, articles and publications

Image of Early US Jet Fighters: Proposals, Projects and Prototypes

Early US Jet Fighters: Proposals, Projects and Prototypes

Tony Buttler

In the aftermath of World War II the development of military fighter aircraft in the USA continued apace to take advantage of a new form of propulsion the jet engine. With incredibly swift progress, post-war fighter design embraced supersonic types and the early development of the American jet fighter reached its maturity.

Design competitions were held which led to the F-87 to F-93 series of fighters and, not to be outdone, the US Navy ran competitions for carrier-based jets which resulted in the Douglas Skyknight, Grumman Panther and Vought Cutlass.

All projects resulted in a large number of design studies and proposals including plans for a Navy Long Range Escort Fighter (the abandoned OS-112). Some are quite well known but, following recent access to the papers in the Sarah Clark and George Spangenberg document collections in the US National Archives, many further previously unknown or unseen designs have come to light including new information on the types that were flown.

Competitions for, amongst others, the McDonnell Demon carrier based jet fighter together with flying boat fighters culminated in the first full supersonic design competitions held for each service including the MX1554 (Convair F-102 Delta Dagger) and OS-130 (Vought F8U Crusader) programs.

Early US Jet Fighter, Proposals, Projects and Prototypes tells the story of these developments backed up with three-view drawings, manufacturer's models and rare photographs.

Appendices illustrate the effort being put into this work during the 1940s and 1950s, by detailing American research establishments and test facilities, chief designers, flight characteristics and a curious one-off study of an in-flight refuelling concept.

Image of British Cold War Fighters

British Cold War Fighters

<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Tim-McLelland/e/B0034PMJOS/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1">Tim McLelland</a>

Explores the development of the British jet fighter, tracing the first designs to the jets which entered service with the RAF and Fleet Air Arm. Each type is examined, how the design was created and translated into operational aircraft. The development and history of each is studied with narrative leading to the present day and the latest generation of Typhoons.

Image of Latin American Fighters: A History of Fighter Jets in Service with Latin American Air Arms

Latin American Fighters: A History of Fighter Jets in Service with Latin American Air Arms

Iñigo Guevara Moyano

This book for the first time describes the military fighter jet aviation in Latin America. It covers the eventful history of fighter jets in 17 countries ranging from Mexico in the north down to Argentina in the south.

Each country is covered type by type in chronological order. Information on each type is being provided related to purchase, squadron service, losses, upgrades and service history.

Each type ends with a table covering the number of delivered aircraft, different types and subtypes, delivery dates and known serial numbers.

Each of the over 100 aircraft types mentioned could be covered with at least one picture.

An appendix lists the existing plastic scale model kits in 1/72, 1/48 and 1/32 scale as wells as decal sheets in regards to the 17 Latin American air forces featured in the book.

This book for the first time describes the military fighter jet aviation in Latin America. It covers the eventful history of fighter jets in 17 countries, ranging from Mexico in the north down to Argentina in the south.

Each country is covered type by type in chronological order. Information on each type is being provided related to purchase, squadron service, losses, upgrades and service history. Each type ends with a table covering the number of delivered aircraft, different types and subtypes, delivery dates and known serial numbers.

An appendix lists the existing plastic scale model kits in 1/72, 1/48 and 1/32 scale, as well as decal sheets in regards to the 17 Latin American air forces featured in the book.

Fighter A to Z

Volume 36, Issue 6, 1989, Air International

Continuing the Air International encyclopaedia of the world's fighter aircraft, from the North American F-86D to the F-86F Sabre

Image of F-86 Sabre vs MiG-15: Korea 1950-53 (Duel)

F-86 Sabre vs MiG-15: Korea 1950-53 (Duel)

Doug Dildy

As the routed North Korean People's Army (NKPA) withdrew into the mountainous reaches of their country and the People's Republic of China (PRC) funneled in its massive infantry formations in preparation for a momentous counter-offensive in the last months of 1950, both lacked adequate air power to challenge US and UN air supremacy over both the battlefields and the logistics channels from China into North Korea. Reluctantly, Josef Stalin agreed to provide the requisite air cover, introducing the superior swept-wing MiG-15 to counter the American's straight-wing F-80 jets and to repel the United States Air Force (USAF) B-29 bomber formations that were interdicting the PRC's flow of troops and supplies into North Korea. This in turn prompted the USAF, against its conventional wisdom of retaining its first-line air-defence fighters to face Soviet air forces across the 'Iron Curtain' in Europe, to deploy its very best - the F-86A Sabre - to counter this threat. Thus began a two-and-a-half-year struggle in the skies over a corner of North Korea known as "MiG Alley."

In this period, the unrelenting campaign for aerial superiority witnessed the introduction of successive models of these two revolutionary jets - the MiG-15bis, the F-86E, and eventually the F-86F - into combat. It also saw the transition of operational leadership on the communist side from the Soviet "volunteers" to the newly formed Chinese PLAAF air divisions, and witnessed the re-introduction of the NKPAF, with its "just trained" MiG-15 units, into the air-combat arena. This meticulously researched study not only provides technical descriptions of the two types and their improved variants, complete with a "fighter pilot's assessment" of these aircraft, but also chronicles the entire scope of their aerial duel in "MiG Alley" by employing the recollections of the surviving combatants - including Russian, Chinese, and North Korean pilots - who participated.

Flash of Sabres

Number 52 , 1989, Wingspan/Planes Magazine

Richard Ward

North American's exciting F-86 Sabre jet fighter is this month's colour feature by Richard Ward

Image of F-86 Sabre vs MiG-15: Korea 1950-53 (Duel)

F-86 Sabre vs MiG-15: Korea 1950-53 (Duel)

Duel Series <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Doug-Dildy/e/B001JP1W2A/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1">Doug Dildy</a>

As the routed North Korean People's Army (NKPA) withdrew into the mountainous reaches of their country and the People's Republic of China (PRC) funneled in its massive infantry formations in preparation for a momentous counter-offensive in the last months of 1950, both lacked adequate air power to challenge US and UN air supremacy over both the battlefields and the logistics channels from China into North Korea. Reluctantly, Josef Stalin agreed to provide the requisite air cover, introducing the superior swept-wing MiG-15 to counter the American's straight-wing F-80 jets and to repel the United States Air Force (USAF) B-29 bomber formations that were interdicting the PRC's flow of troops and supplies into North Korea. This in turn prompted the USAF, against its conventional wisdom of retaining its first-line air-defence fighters to face Soviet air forces across the 'Iron Curtain' in Europe, to deploy its very best - the F-86A Sabre - to counter this threat. Thus began a two-and-a-half-year struggle in the skies over a corner of North Korea known as "MiG Alley."

In this period, the unrelenting campaign for aerial superiority witnessed the introduction of successive models of these two revolutionary jets - the MiG-15bis, the F-86E, and eventually the F-86F - into combat. It also saw the transition of operational leadership on the communist side from the Soviet "volunteers" to the newly formed Chinese PLAAF air divisions, and witnessed the re-introduction of the NKPAF, with its "just trained" MiG-15 units, into the air-combat arena. This meticulously researched study not only provides technical descriptions of the two types and their improved variants, complete with a "fighter pilot's assessment" of these aircraft, but also chronicles the entire scope of their aerial duel in "MiG Alley" by employing the recollections of the surviving combatants - including Russian, Chinese, and North Korean pilots - who participated.

Image of Aces At War: The American Aces Speak

Aces At War: The American Aces Speak

Eric Hammel

ACES AT WAR
The American Aces Speak
by
Eric Hammel


Adding to the first three volumes of his acclaimed series, The American Aces Speak, leading combat historian Eric Hammel comes through with yet another engrossing collection of thirty-eight first-person accounts by American fighter aces serving in World War II, the Israeli War of Independence, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War

Aces At War is a highly charged excursion into life and death in the air, told by men who excelled at piston-engine and jet-engine aerial combat and lived to tell about it. It is an emotional rendering of what brave airmen felt and how they fought in the now-dim days of America’s living national history.

Ride with Flying Tigers ace Charlie Bond as he is shot down in flames over the Chinese city he alone has been able to defend against Japanese bombers. Share the loneliness of command as Lieutenant Commander Tom Blackburn decides the fate of the fellow Navy pilot whose F4U Corsair malfunctions in a desperate battle over Rabaul. Feel 2d Lieutenant Deacon Priest’s overwhelming sense of duty to a friend as he lands his P-51 Mustang behind German lines to rescue his downed squadron commander. Share Lieutenant Colonel Ed Heller’s desperation as he fights his way out of his uncontrollable F-86 Sabre jet over the wrong side of the Yalu River. And join Major Jim Kasler as he leads what might be the most important air strike of the Vietnam War.

These are America’s eagles, and the stories they tell are their own, in their very own words.

Image of Tactical Reconnaissance in the Cold War: 1945 to Korea, Cuba, Vietnam and the Iron Curtain

TACTICAL RECONNAISSANCE IN THE COLD WAR: 1945 to Korea, Cuba, Vietnam and The Iron Curtain

Douglas Gordon

This book describes how the United States Air Force tactical reconnaissance units operated from the end of World War II until the 1970s. This was an immensely active period that also included major conflicts in Korea and Vietnam. It was also a period of rapid technological development in aircraft and photographic techniques. The book includes the following: Introduction: The post war period in Europe and the East. The Korean Conflict and the role of the 67th TRW from 1950 to 1954. The role of the highly secret RF-86 missions over Red China and the Soviet Far East in the early to mid '50s. Also the RB-57A missions out of Bitburg and Yokota flying clandestinely over the Soviet Union and the RF-100A missions that were flown over the Soviet Union from Turkey, Rhine Maine and Yokota. United States Air Forces in Europe. The Cuban Missile Crisis and the role of the RF-101 Voodoos and RB-66s. Highly Illustrated with 164 colour & 221 Mono photos, 13 colour profiles and 9 colour insignia. Profiles designed by Robbie Robson.

This book describes how the United States Air Force tactical reconnaissance units operated from the end of World War II until the 1970s. This was an immensely active period that also included major conflicts in Korea and Vietnam. It was also a period of rapid technological development in aircraft and photographic techniques. The book includes the following: Introduction: The post war period in Europe and the East. The Korean Conflict and the role of the 67th TRW from 1950 to 1954. The role of the highly secret RF-86 missions over Red China and the Soviet Far East in the early to mid '50s. Also the RB-57A missions out of Bitburg and Yokota flying clandestinely over the Soviet Union and the RF-100A missions that were flown over the Soviet Union from Turkey, Rhine Maine and Yokota. United States Air Forces in Europe. The Cuban Missile Crisis and the role of the RF-101 Voodoos and RB-66s. Colour Profiles done by Robbie Robinson

Tasty Hawaii

Number 70, May 1987, Flypast magazine

Robbie Shaw

Palm trees, silver sands, clear water, exotic cotails by the pool... Hawaii has all that but if any other excuse were needed, Robbie Shaw has discovered a thriving historic aircraft population. Robbie suffered all of the above to send us his report...

Assam Dragons

Number 204, July 1998, Flypast magazine

Robert F Dorr

Combat operations in Korea by the 25th FIS - superb period colour photography.

Image of North American, Canadair and Commonwealth F-86 Sabre: In RAF, RCAF, RAAF, SAAF, Pakistani and Malaysian Service (On Target Profiles)

North American, Canadair and Commonwealth F-86 Sabre: In RAF, RCAF, RAAF, SAAF, Pakistani and Malaysian Service

On Target Profiles Jon Freeman

The F-86 Sabre simply has to be one of the most adored "classic jets" there is. It saw front-line service in all corners of the world and wore varied colour schemes in many different operational environments. The British Commonwealth were quick to see the potential of this sleek, swept wing fighter and both Canadair in Canada and the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation (CAC) built the jet under license.

The book incorporates many rare schemes which have come to light out of information drawn from private collections in Canada and Australia. Among the air arms featured are the Royal Air Force, Royal Canadian Air Force, Royal Australian Air Force, South African Air Force, Pakistan Air Force and the Royal Malaysian Air Force. In short, this is a very colourful and informative title.

THE ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE

Volume 47, Issue 2, 1994, Air International

Matthew Wright

Conceived in 1921, the Royal Australian Air Force is responsible for protecting an area of over 7,000,000km2
and a population of some 17 million. Matthew Wright reviews the current structure and aircraft, and outlines its history.

"ESTABLISHED on March 31. 1921. the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is one of the oldest air forces in the world. and today has an establishment numbering 24,142 personnel and more than 150 aircraft. From a widespread network of bases, the force provides air defence for the Australian sub-continent which. with its immense coastline and huge desert expanses , has always posed problems to defence planners...."

FIGHTER A TO Z

Volume 36, Issue 5, 1989, Air International

Continuing the AIR INTERNATIONAL encyclopaedia of the world's fighter aircraft. from the North American P-51H Mustang to the North American F-86A Sabre.

SOUTH-EAST ASIAN AIR ARM

Volume 36, Issue 1, 1989, Air International

The Bangladesh Defence Force's Aviation Wing is inevitably constrained by the financial limitations of the nation as a whole, but as this account shows, it maintains a viable force in support of t he national effort.

BOLIVIAN AIR POWER SEVENTY YEARS ON

Volume 33, Issue 4, 1987, Air International

Martin Siegrist

Unable to afford up- to-date warplanes, the Fuerza
Aerea Boliviana is today one of the last air forces to feature the F-86 Sabre as front-line equipment. Martin Siegrist provides an illustrated report from South America.

Fighters In Transition

Volume 29, Issue 09, 2001, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Robert F Dorr

In the third and final part of his series marking the 50th anniversary ot the conflict, Robert F. Dorr examines jey-versus-jet combat in the Korean War

Making the "Right Stuff" Right

Volume 26, Issue 1, 1984, Air International

Thomas McKelvey Cleaver

Releasted for general viewing in the USA during Octiber, the motion picture "The Right Stuff" is a dramatic presentation of the story of America's first astronauts and the test-pilots of rocket powered aircraft who preceded them to the edge of space. Interesting in its own right, the film has attracted more that its share of attention for the spotlight it throws on John Glenn just as he launches his campaign for nomination as Democratic candidate in the US Presidential elections next November. "The Right Stuff" is based on the book of the same title by Tom Wolfe, which has already sold more than a million copies in the Bantam paperback edition, and its filming called for much special effort to recreate the flying sequences, as described here by Thomas McKelvey Cleaver

Jet Shop

Number 199, February 1998, Flypast magazine

John Morgan

John Morgans Pride Aircraft Co has establusged an enviable reputation in the warbirst restoration arena - and in recent years has become heavily involved in a variety of Jets

Image of F-86 Sabre - Walk Around No. 21

F-86 Sabre - Walk Around No. 21

Larry Davis

With its origins in the closing months of WWII, the F-86 Sabre first entered service with the USAF in 1949. The F-86 saved the day after the opening of hostilities in Korea, where the US and her Allies found themseslves outmatched in the air by the North Korean MiG-15. During the Korean War, F-86s shot down 800 MiGs, compared to the loss of a mere 78 Sabres. This title shows an in-depth look at the F-86A, E, and F day fighters during the Korean War and beyond. Includes detailed coverage of engines, cockpits, landing gear, and weapons. Illustrated with 103 b/w and 83 color photos, 46 color drawings, 20 b/w line drawings. Davis; 80 pages.

29/12/1999

Image of MiG Alley: Sabres Vs. MiGs Over Korea

MiG Alley: Sabres Vs. MiGs Over Korea

David R McLaren , Warren Thompson

MiGs Vs Sabres Over Korea relates the intense air battles fought by F-86 Sabres and MiG-15s over North Korea's infamous "MiG Alley" during the Korean War. Included are in-depth interviews with F-86 pilots that explain tactics and details of encounters and kills against MiG pilots - most of whom were from the Soviet Union and Warsaw Pact countries. Coverage of the fighter-bomber version of the Sabre that was operational during the final months of the war is included. An outstanding feature of this book is that it provides a day-by-day running account of MiG versus Sabre air battles and a detailed record of the fate of each and every SabreJet that served in Korea.

Image of Fast Jet Fighters 1948-1978

Fast Jet Fighters 1948-1978

Martin W Bowman

Voodoo, Starfighter, Thunderchiefemotive names for a new generation of fighters that trebled the speeds at which air combat was previously fought. This was the age in which speed won air battles and when many of the most beautiful airplanes ever designed could be seen flashing across the sky. 136 colour photos are featured.

No. 126 - F-86 Sabre in action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

SABREJET! — That word instantly brings to mind thoughts of silver swept wing jets locked in mortal combat in the skies over Korea. But the North American Aviation (NAA) F-86 Sabre was much more than that. Not only was it the best clear-air fighter in the world at that time, the basic design would evolve into the only production single seat all-weather jet interceptor, an atomic capable fighter-bomber and a carrier-based fleet interceptor and fighter-bomber for the Navy. The F-86 series was built by many different manufacturers throughout the Free World and served to counter the Soviet threat during the 1950s. The F-86 Sabre was just one of the superb designs to come from North American Aviation. During the 1940s and 1950s North American literally"owned" the military aircraft sales market, not just in America, but throughout the Free World. This aviation giant began life as a holding company in the early 1930s with no designs of its own. Originally founded in 1928, the company was...

No. 126 - F-86 Sabre in action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

SABREJET! — That word instantly brings to mind thoughts of silver swept wing jets locked in mortal combat in the skies over Korea. But the North American Aviation (NAA) F-86 Sabre was much more than that. Not only was it the best clear-air fighter in the world at that time, the basic design would evolve into the only production single seat all-weather jet interceptor, an atomic capable fighter-bomber and a carrier-based fleet interceptor and fighter-bomber for the Navy. The F-86 series was built by many different manufacturers throughout the Free World and served to counter the Soviet threat during the 1950s. The F-86 Sabre was just one of the superb designs to come from North American Aviation. During the 1940s and 1950s North American literally"owned" the military aircraft sales market, not just in America, but throughout the Free World. This aviation giant began life as a holding company in the early 1930s with no designs of its own. Originally founded in 1928, the company was...

The Fighter - A Provocative view of four decades of fighter development

Volume 28, Issue 6, 1985, Air International

Mike Spick

Beginning a three-part series in which Mike Spick, presents a provocative review of fighter development over the past forty years, from the F-86 sabre and MiG-25 that fought in Korean skies

Arabian Fledgling ... the Royal Saudi Air Force

Volume 2, Issue 6, 1972, Air International

A massive defence equipment programme adopted by Saudi Arabia has given that countries air arm a significant role in the turbulent Arabian Gulf area. The past history and present state of the RSAF is related in detail, this exclusive feature being illustrated with colour and black-and-white photographs

Recollections of the Canadian Sabre

Volume 2, Issue 4, 1972, Air International

D Hunt , David Hunt

A pilot;s view of the famous fighter is provided by David Hunt, adn we publish a cutaway drawing and a run-down of Canadair Sabre

Reunited

Number 161, December 1994, Flypast magazine

Robin Olds rejoins his Sabre. Spitfire groundcrew meet ML407

KOREAN WAR CHEETAHS

Number 233, December 2000, Flypast magazine

Warren Thompson

Warren E Thompson describes the South African Air Forces part in the Korean War, from Mustangs to Sabres

USAF's Last F-86F Sabre

Number 301, August 2006, Flypast magazine

The last F-86F in USAF service was flown by an RAF pilot - see page 74.

First and Last

Number 301, August 2006, Flypast magazine

JD Heron

Gp Capt J D 'Jock' Heron OBE recollects how he had the honour to fly the last F-86F Sabre in USAF service.

Top Secret over Korea

Number 314, September 2007, Flypast magazine

Warren Thompson

Combat trials with 20mm cannon-armed F-86 Sabres described by Warren E Thompson.

Time Capsule

Number 191, June 1997, Flypast magazine

Ken Ellis

The famed 'Library of Flight' at the College of Aeronautics, Cranfield, provided a unique boost to the UK's aviation museums. In a two-part feature, Ken Ellis examines the development and ultimate dispersal of the collection.

Time Capsule

Number 190, May 1997, Flypast magazine

Ken Ellis

The famed 'Library of Flight' at the College of Aeronautics, Cranfield, provided a unique boost to the UK's aviation museums. In a two-part feature, Ken Ellis examines the development and ultimate dispersal of the collection.

First and Last

Number 337, August 2009, Flypast magazine

Sabre versus MiG – the first clash and the final show-down.

Image of Sabre, Mig-15 & Hunter (Legends of the Air) (Vol 1)

Sabre, Mig-15 & Hunter (Legends of the Air) (Vol 1)

Legends of the Air Stewart Wilson

This is the first in the Legends of the Air series and as its title suggests narrates the histories of three of the classic jet fighters of the 1950s.

Legends 1, like all the books in this series, is essentially three books in one and covers each phase of the development and operation of these three very different yet technically competing aircraft which emerged at a time when the Cold War was anything but cold.

The North American Sabre was the best the West had in 1950 when war erupted in Korea. The USSR surprised the West by the unexpectedly good performance of the previously little known MiG-15, a fine aircraft at the time only let down by poor airmanship and restricted tactical doctrine. England's Hunter followed these two into the air and naturally exceeded the performance of both, consequently remaining in widespread service well into the early 1990s.

In addition to the approximately 70,000 words of text by Stewart Wilson, Sabre, MiG-15 & Hunter is illustrated with 36 specially commissioned color sideview drawings and technical cutaways by Juanita Franzi, and features specification and production tables, maps of areas of operations, and hundreds of photographs.

F-86 Sabre And F/A-22 Raptor

Volume 64, Issue 2, 2003, Air International

Robert F Dorr

Technologies and the ‘world order’ have changed enormously in the 50-odd years separating the F-86 Sabre and F/A-22 Raptor. In the ninth of an occasional series comparing aerospace technologies of the 1950s and 1960s with those of today, Robert F Dorr highlights the similarities and differences between these ‘dedicated’ fighters.

Fury-The Navy'S Sabre

Volume 44, Issue 1, 1993, Air International

Robert F Dorr

In this month's Warbirds feature Robert F Dorr gives a technical description of the US Navy's North American Fury swept wing fighter.

Air combat, Korea: Sabre vs MiG-15

Issue 13 - Winter 2001, Jets Magazine

Robert F Dorr

At the age of 24 Doug Carter found himself high overthe Yalu, inthe biggest air battles ever seen. By Robert F. Dorr.

Cold War Warrior: F-86 Sabre in RAF Service

Volume 7 Issue 8, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

Paul Lucas

Camouflage and Markings for the F-86 Sabre in RAF service Paul Lucas outlines the camouflage and markings applied to the RAF’s stopgap swept wing fighter between 1953 and 1956

No. 33 - F-86 Sabre in Action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

n 1944, the war in Europe was moving towards culmination. The Atlantic Wall had been breached, Russian forces were approaching German soil, and the Allied Air Forces pounded German cities every day and night. But the Germans did not die easily. They unveiled three weapons of the future - the V-1, V-2, and a jet propelled interceptor - the Me 262. The Me 262 so revolutionized aerial warfare that, if used correctly, it could have halted the allied air offensive. However, decisions at the very top of the German General Staff rendered the Me 262, as a weapons system, practically useless. The fact that the Germans had been able to produce so advanced a fighter well before similar American projects bore fruit came as a profound jolt to US Army Air Force strategy. The Bell P-59 Airacomet was already flying, and the Lockheed XP-80 was almost ready for testing, but obviously plans had to be made to counter the logical next-generation of German (or if necessary, Russian) jet fighters. In...

Image of North American F-86 Sabre Pilot's Flight Operating Instructions

North American F-86 Sabre Pilot's Flight Operating Instructions

United States Air Force

Built as both a fighter-interceptor and fighter-bomber, the F-86 Sabre (sometimes called the Sabrejet) was one of the most widely-produced fighters of the Cold War. In December of 1950, three squadrons of Sabres were rushed into combat in Korea, where they dueled North Korean, Chinese and Russian pilots flying the MiG-15. By the time the war was over, F-86 pilots achieved a stunning victory ratio - destroying nearly 800 enemy aircraft with a loss of only 76 Sabres. The nimble jet also saw combat in the Taiwan Straight Crisis and the Indo-Pakistan Wars of 1965 and 1971. Originally printed by North American and the U.S. Air Force, this F-86E flight operating manual taught pilots everything they needed to know before entering the cockpit. Classified "Restricted", the manual was recently declassified and is here reprinted in book form. This facsimile has been reformatted and color images appear in black and white. Care has been taken to preserve the integrity of the text.

17/05/2010

Image of F-86 Sabre (Combat Legends)

F-86 Sabre (Combat Legends)

Martin Bowman

With its distinctive wail the F-86 is remembered from the 1950s for its air superiority in the Korean War where it tangled with Russia's MiG-15 in the first jet versus jet combats. It was the first experience of high-speed jet flight for the NATO air forces and it closed the gap with the previously superior Soviet jet fighters. The design borrowed heavily from WWII German high speed flight research but was truly a pilot's airplane.

Image of North American F-86 SabreJet Day Fighters (Warbird Tech)

North American F-86 Sabrejet Day Fighters - Warbird Tech Vol. 3

David Menard

Filled with vintage photos of North American's legendary F-86 Sabre from assembly line to flight line, plus exploded views, cutaway and phantom drawings from tech manuals, disassembled aircraft, rare variants, experimental models, camouflage markings, armament configurations and more. WarbirdTech 3.

25/10/1996

Image of North American F-86 Sabre (Crowood Aviation Series)

North American F-86 Sabre

Duncan Curtis

The F-86 Sabre was the most widely produced post-war swept wing fighter. Aviation historian and Sabre researcher Duncan Curtis tells the full story of the design, development and operational use of both the F-86 and its close relative the Navy's FJ Fury. Curtis chronicles the aircraft's many variants and its worldwide use by countries from Great Britain to Australia. Fully illustrated with many rare photos.

15/07/2000

Image of F-86 SABRE: The Operational Record

F-86 SABRE: The Operational Record

Robert Jackson

In this book, Robert Jackson charts the operational career of the F-86, from its inception through the embattled skies of Korea to its role as NATO's guardian and after, when it became the fighter workhorse of many Third World nations.

17/04/1995

Image of The Cutting Edge: A Half Century of U.S. Fighter Aircraft R&D

The Cutting Edge: A Half Century of U.S. Fighter Aircraft R&D

Mark Lorell

The proposition that innovation is critical in the cost-effective design and development of successful military aircraft is still subject to some debate. RAND research indicates that innovation is promoted by intense competition among three or more industry competitors. Given the critical policy importance of this issue in the current environment of drastic consolidation of the aerospace defense industry, the authors here examine the history of the major prime contractors in developing jet fighters since World War II. They make use of an extensive RAND database that includes nearly all jet fighters, fighter-attack aircraft, and bombers developed and flown by U.S. industry since 1945, as well as all related prototypes, modifications, upgrades, etc. The report concludes that (1) experience matters, because of the tendency to specialize and thus to develop system-specific expertise; (2) yet the most dramatic innovations and breakthroughs came from secondary or marginal players trying to compete with the industry leaders; and (3) dedicated military R&D conducted or directly funded by the U.S. government has been critical in the development of new higher-performance fighters and bombers.

25/10/1998

Image of F-86 Sabre Fighter-Bomber Units over Korea (Osprey Frontline Colour 2)

F-86 Sabre Fighter-Bomber Units over Korea (Osprey Frontline Colour 2)

Warren Thompson

The exploits of F-86 fighter-bombers in Korea never received quite the same attention as those of their F-86 fighter-interceptor brethren. However, these "mud-moving" Sabres sported impressive capabilities: they could carry two 1,000-pound bombs, two 120-gallon external fuel tanks, and 1,800 rounds of .50-caliber ammunition to any point in North Korea. And unlike other Western aircraft, fighter-bomber Sabres could handle the MiG-15 threat without a dedicated fighter escort.

1/12/1999

Image of Hot Shots: An Oral History of the Air Force Combat Pilots of the Korean War

Hot Shots: An Oral History of the Air Force Combat Pilots of the Korean War

Jennie E Chancey

Known as the "Forgotten War," the Korean War heralded a new era of warfare--one where countries from around the world struggled over the fate of a relatively small peninsula jutting into the Sea of Japan. Between 1950 and 1953, more than fifty thousand Americans gave their lives in pursuit of democracy for the Korean people.

The Korean War was also the proving ground for post-World War II aviation, when the first generation of jet aircraft took to the skies to tangle in deadly combat. It was the battlefield of Sabres and MiGs, American Hot Shots and Communist Honchos. And more than ever before, control of the skies meant victory or failure in the ground war raging below.

Now, fifty years after the war's outbreak, Hot Shots captures the voices of the original top guns, the pilots who flew Mustangs, Sabres, and Shooting Stars and confronted a superior number of enemy aircraft. Among the men who tell their stories are Lieutenant Colonel Duane E. "Bud" Biteman, one of the first fliers in the war; Lieutenant General Frederick "Boots" Blesse, double ace who led efforts to refine tactical training for the new jet pilots; Colonel Cecil Foster, who fought in one of the longest-running air-to-air jet encounters; and Colonel Harold Fischer, a double-ace flier who was captured behind enemy lines and held as a POW until 1955, two years after the official end of the war.

Editors Chancey and Forstchen combine these compelling firsthand accounts with dozens of never-before-published photographs of air force pilots at work, as well as a history of the major events of the war. Hot Shots brings to vivid life the risk, dedication, and bravery of these forgotten heroes. May their sacrifice not be in vain.

1/04/2000

Image of I Always Wanted to Fly: America's Cold War Airmen

I Always Wanted to Fly: America’s Cold War Airmen

Wolfgang W E Samuel

Until now, no book has covered all of Cold War air combat in the words of the men who waged it. In I Always Wanted to Fly, retired United States Air Force Colonel Wolfgang W. E. Samuel has gathered first-person memories from heroes of the cockpits and airstrips.

Battling in dogfights when jets were novelties, saving lives in grueling airlifts, or flying dangerous reconnaissance missions deep into Soviet and Chinese airspace, these flyers waged America's longest and most secretively conducted air war.

Many of the pilots Samuel interviewed invoke the same sentiment when asked why they risked their lives in the air--"I always wanted to fly." While young, they were inspired by barnstormers, by World War I fighter legends, by the legendary Charles Lindbergh, and often just by seeing airplanes flying overhead. With the advent of World War II, many of these dreamers found themselves in cockpits soon after high school. Of those who survived World War II, many chose to continue following their dream, flying the Berlin Airlift, stopping the North Korean army during the "forgotten war" in Korea, and fighting in the Vietnam War.

Told in personal narratives and reminiscences, I Always Wanted to Fly renders views from pilots' seats and flight decks during every air combat flashpoint from 1945--1968. Drawn from long exposure to the immense stress of warfare, the stories these warriors share are both heroic and historic.

The author, a veteran of many secret reconnaissance missions, evokes individuals and scenes with authority and grace. He provides clear, concise historical context for each airman's memories. In I Always Wanted to Fly he has produced both a thrilling and inspirational acknowledgment of personal heroism and a valuable addition to our documentation of the Cold War.

21/08/2001

Image of F-86 Sabre Pilot's Flight Operating Manual

F-86 Sabre Pilot's Flight Operating Manual

United States Air Force

Built as both a fighter-interceptor and fighter-bomber, the F-86 Sabre (sometimes called the Sabrejet) was one of the most widely-produced fighters of the Cold War. In December of 1950, three squadrons of Sabres were rushed into combat in Korea, where they dueled North Korean, Chinese and Russian pilots flying the MiG-15. By the time the war was over, F-86 pilots achieved a stunning victory ratio - destroying nearly 800 enemy aircraft with a loss of only 76 Sabres. The nimble jet also saw combat in the Taiwan Straight Crisis and the Indo-Pakistan Wars of 1965 and 1971. Originally printed by North American and the U.S. Air Force, this F-86 Flight Operating Manual taught pilots everything they needed to know before entering the cockpit. Classified "Restricted", the manual was recently declassified and is here reprinted in book form. This facsimile has been reformatted and color images appear in black and white. Care has been taken to preserve the integrity of the text.

7/08/2007

Image of In Their Own Words: True Stories and Adventures of the American Fighter Ace

In Their Own Words: True Stories and Adventures of the American Fighter Ace

James Oleson

More than 100 legendary pilots have granted and shared personal glimpses of their illustrious military careers to help create this tribute to the American Fighter Ace.In Their Own Words: True Stories and Adventures of the American Fighter Ace explores and illustrates the courage, resourcefulness and patriotism of America's fighter aces. These heroic flyers have given personal glimpses and recollections on what it took to fly, fight and survive combat missions in World War II and Korea.

13/11/2007

Image of The 4th Fighter Wing: In the Korean War

The 4th Fighter Wing in the Korean War

Larry Davis

This book covers the history of the 4th Fighter Wing, from re-activation in 1946, through the end of the short TDY to Korea in 1957. The early history covers the entire F-80 era, including the first jet aerobatic team, and the introduction of the legendary F-86 Sabre in 1949. From daily squadron diaries, the coverage on Korea begins with the move to Korea in November 1950, through the first operations in December, including a first person account of LtCol Bruce Hintons first MiG kill. Dozens of MiG kill reports are included in the various chapters, with another first person account of Capt Jim Jabaras fifth and sixth kills, making him the first jet ace in history. Pilots from the 4th Wing accounted for 502 of the 792 MiGs shot down in the Korean War, and had twenty-five aces of the total of thirty-nine aces crowned in Korea. Photo coverage includes most of the aces and their aircraft, maintenance, and airfield scenes. A complete list of every victory, and all the losses, is also contained. Interviews with pilots, crew chiefs, and factory tech reps tell the complete story of the Fourth But First before, during, and after the Korean War.

1/06/2001

Mig Killer Sabre

Number 228, July 2000, Flypast magazine

John M Dibbs

John Glenn's Korc.In F 86 Sabre Has Been Recreated. John Dibbs Photography.

RAF Hunters V Migs

Number 228, July 2000, Flypast magazine

Rod Dean

Rod Dean Remembers An Air Combat Training Session In Pakistan With Raf Hunters 'Mixing It' With Paf Sabres And Migs.

In Defence Of The Realm

Number 222, January 2000, Flypast magazine

I Lie Story Of The Role Played By The F-86 Sabres Of The 81St Fighter Interceptor Wing In The Defence Of The Uk During The 1950S

North American F-86 Sabre

Number 2, July 1981, Flypast magazine

A swept wing pioneer that became one of the most significant military aircraft in history.

Image of Mikoyan Gurevich MiG-15 Fagot - Warbird Tech Vol. 40

Mikoyan Gurevich MiG-15 Fagot (Warbird Tech, Vol. 40)

Yefim Gordon

In the years following World War II, many nations made use of captured German technology, and given the pressures of the incipient Cold War, Soviet engineers often had very little time to produce an "answer to the West". As a result, the MiG-15's designers made use of German technologies and a British powerplant, which served to accelerate the fighter's development. The MiG-15 had a long service career and was built in huge numbers both within and outside the Soviet Union. The main factors in the MiG-15's success were a turbojet rated at over 2,000 kg (4,409 lb) of thrust, a new configuration with swept wings and empennage, and new pilot survival aids including an ejection seat. These, together with heavy armament and ease of manufacture and operation, made the MiG-15 a superb fighter jet. In fact, it paved the way for Soviet fighter design for the next decade. WarbirdTech Volume 40.

Image of MiG Alley: Air to Air Combat over Korea - Aircraft Specials series (6020)

MiG Alley: Air to Air Combat over Korea - Aircraft Specials series (6020)

Larry Davis

A pictorial record of the American pilots who ran up a 10 to 1 victory ratio over the MiG-15. In the pilots own words of what it was like to fly the F-86 Sabre against North Korea & Soviet pilots. 145 photos, 7 maps, 28 dwgs, 40 full color paintings, 10 photos. 80 pages.

Image of Sabre: The Canadair Sabre in RAF Service

Sabre: The Canadair Sabre in RAF Service

Duncan Curtis

In the early 1950s the Royal Air Force, awaiting the delivery of British-designed aircraft, purchased the Sabre, a US swept-wing jet, as a 'stop-gap fighter'. From 1953 to 1956 Sabres equipped a total of twelve RAF squadrons, all but two of which were based in Germany with 2nd Tactical Air Force defending the NATO front against Warsaw Pact aggression. Duncan Curtis looks at every aspect of Britain's involvement with the Sabre and the service history of each of the RAF squadrons that flew the fighter, employing first-hand accounts by RAF personnel, including those who flew combat missions in the Korean War. Appendices detail every Sabre loss in RAF service, a 'Sabre survivors' listing and an individual history of XB812, the RAF Museum Sabre. The result is the most comprehensive history yet written about the Sabre in RAF service, and the only single-source book available on the subject.

Image of Sabres Over MIG Alley: The F-86 and the Battle for Air Superiority in Korea

Sabres over MiG Alley: The F-86 and the Battle for Air Superiority in Korea

Kenneth P Werrell

This is the story of the first jet versus jet war, the largest in number of victories and losses, and one of the few military bright spots in the Korean War. It tells how an outnumbered force of F-86 Sabres limited by range and restricted by the rules of engagement, decisively defeated its foe. Based on the latest scholarship, author Kenneth Werrell uses previously untapped sources and interviews with sixty former F-86 pilots to explore new aspects of the subject and shed light on controversies previously neglected. For example, he found much greater violation of the Yalu River than thus far has appeared in the published materials. The F-86 became a legend in "The Forgotten War" because of its performance and beauty, but most of all, because of its record in combat.

Image of By the Skin of My Teeth: Flying Raf Spitfires and Mustangs in World War II And USAF Sabre Jets in the Korean War

BY THE SKIN OF MY TEETH: The Memoirs of an RAF Mustang Pilot in World War II and of Flying Sabres with USAF in Korea

Colin Downes

This is a memoir of flying with the Royal Air Force in war and peace during a career in military and civil aviation covering a half century. The text is filled with personal experiences, reminiscences and impressions and is written in four parts. Part One covers the years leading to the author's graduation and the winning of his RAF Wings. This is followed by action-packed stories of flying propeller-driven fighters, Spitfires and Mustangs, during and just after the Second World War. The author then tells of his unique experiences of front-line fighter operations when he flew jets with the United States Air Force during the Korean War. The final chapter covers the remainder of his RAF Service flying until retirement.

Image of F-86 Sabre Aces of the 51st Fighter Wing

F-86 Sabre Aces of the 51st Fighter Wing

Warren Thompson

The 51st Fighter Wing initially flew the F-80C in the Korean War, but in 1951, the 51st brought in high-scoring World War 2 ace Colonel Francis Gabreski to assume command when it converted from the F-80 over to the newly arrived F-86E. His recruits included his elite 4th Wing pilots, and by the end of the war, the 51st had two pilots who achieved the status of "Double Ace" as well as the highest scoring ace of the war, Joe McConnell. This book describes the 51st Wing's tenure with the Sabre that led to their high scoring sprees of 1953.

Image of Cold War Fighter Pilot

Cold War Fighter Pilot

Harold Wade

For those would-be pilots who want to know what it is like to train for and to fly military jet fighters.

Image of Latin American Air Wars 1912-1969

Latin American Air Wars 1912-1969

Dan Hagedorn

The aircraft were colorful and their crews were often courageous - but virtually unknown beyond the South American Continent. With drawings and a detailed text this volume offers a remarkable historical bonanza for students of aeronautical history and aircraft modellers craving something new.

Image of MiG Menace Over Korea: Nikolai Sutiagin, Top Ace Soviet of the Korean War

MiG Menace Over Korea: Nikolai Sutiagin, Top Ace Soviet of the Korean War

Yuri Sutiagin

Nikolai Vasil'evich Sutiagin, the top-scoring Soviet air ace of the Korean War, flew his MiG-15 in lethal dogfights against American Sabres and Australian Meteors. He is credited with at 22 'kills'. Yet the full story of his extraordinary achievements has never been told. Only now, with the opening of Russian archives, can an authoritative account of his wartime exploits be written. The authors use official records, the reminiscences of Sutiagin's comrades and his wife's diary to reconstruct in vivid detail the career of one of the great fighter pilots.

Image of Air Force Tac Recce Aircraft: NATO and Non-aligned Western European Air Force Tactical Reconnaissance Aircraft of the Cold War (1949-1989)

Air Force Tac Recce Aircraft: NATO and Non-aligned Western European Air Force Tactical Reconnaissance Aircraft of the Cold War (1949-1989)

Paul J Wagner CMSGT USAF Retired

This is a comprehensive history of Air Force tactical reconnaissance (Tac Recce) aircraft produced and operated during the Cold War in support of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's (NATO's) and non-aligned nations' tactical air and ground commanders. The aircraft are introduced chronologically based on when they became operational. Each chapter provides a detailed review of individual or groups of similar aircraft. The information presented includes the aircraft's development history; a description of the aircraft's physical characteristics; the number and type of sensors installed; the countries and units that operated the aircraft; information on surviving examples; and a table of the aircraft's dimensions, weight, and performance data.

Image of U.S. Air Force Interceptors: A Military Photo Logbook 1946-1979

U.S. Air Force Interceptors: A Military Photo Logbook 1946-1979

Marty Isham

Following the successful format of previous Specialty Press Military Photo Logbooks, this book offers readers an excellent photo compilation of all the great USAF Air Defense Command interceptors from the entire Cold War era. Beginning after World War II with the propeller-driven Northrop P-61 Black Widow and North American F-82 Twin Mustang, the Air Force's aerial intercept mission entered the jet age with the fabled North American F-86 Sabre, Northrop F-89 Scorpion, and Lockheed F-94 Starfire, all of which are still high-interest aircraft today. Colorful and unique mission-support airplanes such as the C-124, EB-57, EC-121 Constellation, and T-33 are included as well as the famed next-generation Century Series supersonic Air Force interceptors such as the McDonnell F-101B Voodoo, Convair's F-102 Delta Dagger and F-106 Delta Dart twins, and the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter. All the great aircraft flown by the Air Defense Command are well documented here with rare archival and candid photography.

Image of Mig Alley - Sabres vs. MIGs over Korea: Pilot Accounts and the Complete Combat Record of the F-86 Sabre 1950-53

Mig Alley - Sabres vs. MIGs over Korea: Pilot Accounts and the Complete Combat Record of the F-86 Sabre 1950-53

Warren Thompson

The dogfights between World War II prop fighters such as the P-51 Mustang, P-47 Thunderbolt, Me 109 and Japanese Zero have been well documented over the years. However, very little has been written about the dogfights between the state-of-the-art swept wing jets that fought high above northwest Korea in an arena known as 'MiG Alley'. These pitted the North American F-86 Sabre versus the MiG-15 and they were flown by some of the best fighter pilots in history. The speeds at which these two fought initiated many new tactics for aerial combat. Toward the end of the Korean War, it was determined that the F-86 pilots had been flying against some of the most experienced Russian and Warsaw Pact pilots from the very beginning. Many of the Sabre pilots that had numerous kills against the MiGs were young Lieutenants with no World War II experience. Official USAF records state that 78 Sabres were lost in air-to-air action and 792 MiG-15's were shot down in aerial duels. This established a 10:1 ratio in favor of the F-86, although that figure has remained a controversial subject for over 50 years. With the dangerous air-to-ground missions flown by the aging F-80's and F-84's, the success of the F-86 carried over into the fighter bomber role. In January 1953, the F-51 Mustang Wing and the F-80 Wing converted over to the new bomb-carrying F-86F. This added a new dimension in that the new Sabre could work the close air support and interdiction mission and still defend itself against the MiG-15 threat without escorts. By the end of the war, there were four wings, based in South Korea, equipped with the F-86. This book is filled with personal recollections from the pilots that flew the F-86 - many are so vivid that you feel you are in the cockpit with them. It also contains some of the finest quality color images ever published on the Sabre in combat; most were taken by the pilots and crew chiefs. In addition, there is an aircraft-by-aircraft record of every F-86 that flew during the war. This includes squadron assignment, Sabre losses, and final disposition. Also featured is a complete listing of confirmed kills by Sabres and a roster of Korean War aces. Apart from the eyewitness accounts, detailed Sabre information and superb photographs, 'MiG Alley' also features newly commissioned color artwork and color profiles. If you had to describe this book in only one word... it would be "ACTION"!

Pilot Biography: "Bones" Marshall

Volume 30, Issue 04, 2002, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Robert F Dorr

Robert F. Dorr recounts the flying career of a surviving USAF ace from the Korean War

A Shining Sword

Volume 29, Issue 01, 2001, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Michael O'Leary

Air-to-air photographs and history of former astronaut Frank Borman's gleaming Canadair Sabre, by Michael O'Leary

A Singular Sabre

Volume 22, Issue 02, 1994, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

UK-based F-86A Sabre G-SABR was once flown by American ace Robin Olds, as Duncan Curtis relates; pictures by John DibI:

Cockpits of the RAF: Part 6

Volume 12, Issue 03, 1984, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

LFE Coombs

L. F. E. Coombs winds up this series with some observations on the first generation jets: the Vampire, Meteor and Sabre

Sabre set to stun

Volume 33 Issue 01, 2000, Aircraft illustrated

Klingons off the starboard bow as 'Worf shows off his Sabre!

Aircraft Profile 20 - The North American F-86A Sabre

Edward Shacklady

"Few warplanes make history, but those that do are remembered long after their deeds are forgotten. Prime examples are Great Britain's Supermarine Spitfire and Hawker Hurricane; Germany's Messerschmitt Me 109 and Focke-Wulf Fw 190, and Japan's A6M1-3, better known by its wartime appellation of Zero. All these famous fighters had one thing in common—they were designed and built for a war that had been anticipated by the world's major powers for at least three years. And, when World War II finally exploded upon a waiting world in September 1939, this fighting quintet was in full production and awaiting testing in a bitter struggle that took nearly six years to decide. One of the greatest warplanes of the years of uneasy peace that followed the end of World War II in 1945, was not specifically built for the conflict in which it played such a decisive part, but was, in fact, a development of a jet fighter ordered for the U.S. Navy.In late autumn, 1944, the North American Aviation...

Sabres, Spads and Thuds

Volume 11 Issue 3, 2010, Combat Aircraft Magazine

In the latest of our historic combat stories, Robert F. Dorr talks to Charles C. Vasiliadis about his fascinating USAF front-line career

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