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de Havilland Mosquito references, articles and publications

And The Walls Came Tumbling Down

Volume 30, Issue 9, 1994, Air Classics

Fifty years ago, a force of Mosquitos flew a daring ultra-low-level mission to spring French Resistance fighters from Amiens Prison

Clipped Wing!

Number 319, February 2008, Flypast magazine

Andrew Thomas

Andrew Thomas recalls adventures flying Mosquitos, as recounted to him by the late AVM L W G 'Bill' Gill.

Wooden Warbird

Volume 15, Issue 1, 1979, Air Classics

Philip J Birtles

Part three of our complete de Havilland Mosquito History

The Jamieson story

Volume 12, Issue 12, August 1957, Royal Air Force Flying Review

Leslie Hunt

So little time before he left the air forever...But time enough for four kills in one night!

THOUSANDS of men based in Normandy between June 24 and August 6, 1944, may well owe their lives to a young New Zealand pilot of whom they have probably never heard ! George Esmond Jamieson, of Rotherham, Canterbury, in the beautiful south island of New Zealand, arrived in England unheralded and left just as quietly in August, 1944. In between he destroyed eleven Nazi aircraft, " probably destroyed " one, and had one credited, at his own request, as only " damaged." Each of the enemy aircraft was shot down at night or in visibility so poor that a day-fighter could not be sent to intercept ; eight of the " kills " and the " damaged " Gerry were destroyed in the air as they were about to attack our ground forces on the airfields and in the Army positions between the Normandy beaches and the front line.

Maggies to Mossies

Number 98, September 1989, Flypast magazine

Sums up the flying capabilities of an ATA pilot - A N Angus talks of training and his days ferrying

Atlantic Crossing

Number 205, August 1998, Flypast magazine

On July 14, 1948 a formation of six Vampire F.3s of 54 Squadron with three Mosquitoes, departed Odiham en route for North America. Once again the RAF was in the 'record making' business

They who dared first -No 1

Volume 18, Issue 05, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

John Yoxall

A new series on great test pilots who lost their lives while test-fly ing, written by the late John Yoxall and first published in Flight in the Forties
No.1 Geoffrey de Havilland Jr

Pickard: Hero Of Amiens

Volume 22, Issue 05, 1994, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

John Maynard

John Maynard concludes his three-part biography of Gp Capt P.C. Pickard DSO** DFC
John Maynard concludes his three-part biography of Group Captain P.C. Pikard DSO & two bars DFC. In Part three he recounts Operation Jericho, the audacious Mosquito raid on Amiens prison which "Pick" led 50 years ago and from which, tragically, he did not return

The Mosquito Museum

Volume 6 Issue 04, 1973, Aircraft illustrated

Stuart Howe

AMIDST the flat Hertfordshire countryside, just fifteen miles north of London and five miles SOUTh of St Albans, lies the ancient moated manor house of Salisbury Hall. The present house was built in the 17th century, on top of much older foundations, and many famous people are linked with its history, including King Charles II, Neil Gwynne and Sir Winston Churchill.

In the grounds of this hisroric building, and beyond its medieval moat, is established a small collection of aircraft centered around the very historic prototype de Havilland Mosquito.

"What's the prototype Mosquito doing here ?" , is a question often asked. Well , as a matter of fact there could be no better place than at Salisbury Hall, for it was here, early in the Second World War , that the Mosquito was designed and later the first four prototypes built , the last three actually taking-off from the adjacent fields ! ....

The first wooden wonder

Volume 6 Issue 04, 1973, Aircraft illustrated

Philip J Birtles

ALTHOUGH originally envisaged as a high speed unarmed bomber, the Mosquito was initially produced for unarmed reconnaissance. When the prototype was eventually
evaluated at the A and AEE. Boscombe Down, it was so outstanding that all the earlier official resistance was overcome and the Mosq uito went on throughout the war undertaking a great varie ty of tasks, including night fighting, ground attack and passenger -carrying all with great success.

On October 5, 1939, the Mosquito design team moved to the old country house, Salisbury Hall , near London Cotney, Herts so that work could continue on the design in secrecy and without undue interruption.

For the same reasons a hangar was built , disguised as a barn amongst the farm buildings, for the construction of the first prototype. The main feature of this aircraft was the nature of th e construction , which was almost entirely of wood, Amongst the advantages were the use of non -strategic materials and also the...

Across The Ether

Volume 23, Issue 06, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Stephen Pope

Stephen Pope continues his series on RAF radio and radar equipment, describing the birth of airborne radar and the wartime development of Al, ASV, HzS and IFF - the first three located aircraft, ships and ground targets respectively; the last distinguished between Alied and enemy aircraft

Rocket Attack

Volume 23, Issue 06, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Derek Collier Webb

Derek Collier Webb begins a two-part account of the development of the air- launched rocket projectile in the Second World War, touching on the weapons earlier history and then recounting the official deliberations and preliminary trials

Military Personal Album

Volume 23, Issue 06, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Ivor R Stott

Photographs taken at Chakeri in India during 1946-47
 
This selection of photographs was submitted by IVOR R. STOTT of Wimborne, Dorset, who was stationed at Chakeri in India for a year from September 1946. At the time, this aerodrome was home to 322 MU, 101 Air Stores park, and the Royal Indian Air Forces No 6 Sqn
 
Lancastrian VM 735
Spitfire VIIIs MD274, JG263
Mosquito PR.XVI NS688
Class CA Locomotive
Fairchild Argus HB674, HB552

Wooden Wonder

Number 210, January 1999, Flypast magazine

De Havilland's Mosquito was one of the most versatile of the RAF's wartime aircraft and remained in production until 1950. We chart the surviving examples of this classic aircraft

Mosquito Wrecks And Relics

Number 177, April 1996, Flypast magazine

Stuart Howe

Stuart Howe With More Mosquito News
Stuart Howe brings his Mosquito wrecks and relics file (as featured in April and May 1995 issues of FlyPast up to date

Military Personal Album

Volume 23, Issue 07, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Photographs of the Naval Air Fighting Development Unit's aircraft at RAF West Raynham in 1947
This selection of photographs has been submitted by R. Barlow of Boston, Linconshire. During 1947 - 48 hes was an Air Mechanic (engines) with the Naval Air Fighting Development unit (NAFDU), 787 Sqn, at RAF West Raynham n Norfolk, where all of these photographs were taken.
Vampire VF269
Oxford PH 190
Lancastrian VH 743
Saunders Roe SR.A/1 TG 263
Lancastrian VH742
Mosquito FB.VI TE708
 

No shots please, we're British -part 9

Volume 21, Issue 03, 1993, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Roger Anthoine

Roger Anthoine describes another wartime aircraft which crashed in neutral Switzerland during World War Two. Part Nine is the story of a Mosquito which plunged mysteriously into Lake Constance in April 1944.
 
Mosquito VI NS 875

COMMONWEALTH MILITARY SERIALS - AUSTRALIA

Volume 18, Issue 01, 1956, Air Pictorial

Bruce Robertson

IN 1910, two aeroplanes, a Bleriot monoplane and a Wilbur Wright biplane were introduced into Australia. The machines were perfect in themselves, but , there being no person capable of utilising them, they were dismantled and their engines cast into the sea-to avoid import duty! However, the following year, with an aeroplane available, the first Australian obtained the coveted Royal Aero Club Certificate (No. 199), his effort being officially witnessed by four members of the Aerial League of Australia. Military aviation soon followed: in 1913 two B.E.2As were shipped out and used at Point Cook, Victoria , where a flying school had been newly established. It was to become the centre of Australian flying training.

On the outbreak of war in 1914, a Maurice Farman Seaplane, owned by a citizen of Sydney, was presented to the Government; it accompanied the Australian Expeditionary Force to New Guinea, but it is doubtful if it was much used and it ended its days at Point Cook....

Long Range Weathermen

Volume 47, September 1992, Air Enthusiast

Paddy Porter

Paddy Porter presents a comprehensive history of the RAF's dedicated meteorological flights, from unarmed Mosquitoes deep into Reich territory to the charismatic Halifax and the closing Hastings days

EFA's GREAT RADAR CONTEST

Volume 36, Issue 1, 1989, Air International

John Fricker

Important decisions are taken to select the equipment suppliers for the European Fighter Aircraft , John Fricker reviews the characteristics of the two radars on offer, and fills in the background of British development

The Wooden Wonder goes aboard - The de Havilland Sea Mosquito

Volume 26, Issue 6, 1984, Air International

Eric Brown

Capt Eric Brown continues his series on Naval Aircraft of the 'forties with an account of the development of the Sea Mosquito and his first deck landings in a twin-engined aircraft

Bomber Command - the turning points

Number 207, October 1998, Flypast magazine

Martin Middlebrook

Martin Middlebrook continus his assessment of critical elemnents of the Bomber Command war against Germany with a look at navigation/bombing aids and a series of battles

Cover up!

Number 130, May 1992, Flypast magazine

BAe's Mosquito is being recovered for the 1992 season

Mosquito Fighter Variants

Volume 24, Issue 2, 1983, Air International

The second installment of our "Warbirds" feature, in which we describe and illustrate the fighter variants of the Mosquito used by the RAF up to the end of World War II

Mosquito Fighter Variants

Volume 24, Issue 3, 1983, Air International

Concluding instalment of our Warbirds feature on de Havilland's most famous combat aircraft, covering Australian, Canadian and export examples of the day and night fighter version, several of which remained in service for some years after World War Two

Image of Great Book of World War II Airplanes

Great Book of World War II Airplanes

Jeffrey L Ethell

A remarkable overview of World War II aviation encompasses more than four hundred full-color photographs and illustrations, twenty-four foldout panels, detailed cutaway views, and authoritative profiles of twelve aircraft that changed the course of the war.

No. 127 - deHavilland Mosquito in action Part 1

Aircraft in Action Jerry Scutts

Nearly fifty years after the end of the most destructive war in history, veterans of WW II still recall the finer points of the aircraft they flew. The passage of time probably makes them remember the aircraft's good qualities far more then the bad points and that is quite understandable lot would also depend on the aircraft being recalled. If it was the de Havilland Mosquito, there weren't many bad qualities to begin with! The"Mossie" is still held in high esteem by the British, Dominion and American aircrews who were fortunate enough to fly this superlative warplane. Stories told of the Mosquito are legion, but some are particularly appropriate. There was the time when a B-26 Marauder crew met a Mosquito over England. The "word" had gotten around that de Havilland had developed a bomber that was faster than most fighters, let alone bombers. The B-26 crew was not convinced and a race of sorts resulted. They knew that their ship had a high top speed and the anonymous RAF crewwere...

No. 127 - deHavilland Mosquito in action Part 1

Aircraft in Action Jerry Scutts

Nearly fifty years after the end of the most destructive war in history, veterans of WW II still recall the finer points of the aircraft they flew. The passage of time probably makes them remember the aircraft's good qualities far more then the bad points and that is quite understandable lot would also depend on the aircraft being recalled. If it was the de Havilland Mosquito, there weren't many bad qualities to begin with! The"Mossie" is still held in high esteem by the British, Dominion and American aircrews who were fortunate enough to fly this superlative warplane. Stories told of the Mosquito are legion, but some are particularly appropriate. There was the time when a B-26 Marauder crew met a Mosquito over England. The "word" had gotten around that de Havilland had developed a bomber that was faster than most fighters, let alone bombers. The B-26 crew was not convinced and a race of sorts resulted. They knew that their ship had a high top speed and the anonymous RAF crewwere...

No. 139 - Mosquito in action pt 2

Aircraft in Action Jerry Scutts

With the flight testing of the Mosquito prototype ongoing, official Air Ministry skepticism over the capabilities of the wooden aircraft quickly melted away and suddenly, the aircraft was required for every conceivable operational role. One of the more important roles envisioned for the Mosquito was that of high speed night fighter, to replace the aging and slow Blenheim IF and to supplement the Bristol Beaufighter. The prototype Mosquito F Mk 11 (W4052) was ordered under Specification P.21/40 during 1940. This specification called for replacing the observer/bomb aimers glass nose with a solid nose containing an armament of four .303 inch Browning machine guns. Additionally, four 20MM Hispano cannon were installed under the cabin floor in the space normally taken up by the bomb bay. Lastly, a gun camera was mounted in the nose that operated automatically whenever the guns were fired (it could also be operated independently by a switch located next to the gun button on the control...

Mosquito Wrecks and Relics

Number 165, April 1995, Flypast magazine

All to few examples of the 'Wooden Wonder' exist in the world, but over the years ' Bits and Pieces' of Mossies have been uncovered in various locations - some quite unexpected

Personal Album

Volume 3, Issue 01, 1975, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

This months photos come from Sqn Ldr H.J. (Jack) Greenland, who was employed by de Havillands from 1937 till 1950. During the early part of the last war he instructed on No. 1 EFTS at Parnshanger and then became a production test pilot at Hatfield flying Mosquitoes. With the arrival of the Hornet his time was deivided between these two types, and he carried out the first flights of many of the Hornets featured in the first part of our Hornet story. In fact, it was this that prompted him to send in these pictures

An Anglo-Nordic Saga

Volume 2, Issue 12, 1974, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Harald Seabrook-smith

Harold Seabrook-Smith tells the story of a daring, high-speed courier service operated by the unarmed civil aircraft of BOAC during world war two

The F-8 Mosquito in AAF Service

Volume 52 ,Issue 1, 2007, American Aviation Historical Society (AAHS) Journal

Norman Malayney

Aviation literature has scant information on the De Havilland of Canada F-8 Mosquito history. The United States Army Air Forces (AAF) selected this aircraft as an interim solution to solve a long-standing problem during World War II. The following is an edited version from an unpublished copyright manuscript on AAF Mosquito, providing background information regarding its selection and problems encountered bringing the F-8 into operational service. The accidents and incidents detailed in the article are not all-inclusive and more are yet to be uncovered.
Shortly after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, an RAF official visited Washington to explore Army Air Corps (AAC) Intelligence requirements. It was agreed the British Air Ministry (AM) would supply the USA with intelligence concerning Axis forces and targets. The RAF, already with two years of war experience, served as mentor and role model for Army Air Force photo reconnaissance, assisting in all...

Image of The Last Blitz: Operation Steinbock, the Luftwaffe's Last Blitz on Britain - January to May 1944

The Last Blitz: Operation Steinbock, the Luftwaffe's Last Blitz on Britain - January to May 1944

Ron MacKay

To most people, the Blitz lasted from September 1940 to May 1941. However, in December 1943, the code breakers at Bletchley Park received intelligence that the Luftwaffe's bombers were gathering for a major new operation. The Luftwaffe named the campaign attacks Operation Steinbock and committed 524 bombers, including 46 He177 Greif four-engine heavy bombers making a debut over Britain. The RAF was now far better equipped to deal with the new attack with 127 Mosquitoes and the anti-aircraft guns were radar directed. On the evening of 21 January, 227 bombers took off bound for London. For the next four months, attacks continued on London, Hull, Bristol, and other targets. This was the Luftwaffe's final attempt to bomb Britain. Casualties in Britain totaled 1,556 killed and 2,916 seriously injured. The Luftwaffe lost 330 aircraft and their crews—for every five people killed on the ground, the raiders lost one bomber and four trained crewmen killed or captured.

1/04/2011

Image of de Haviland Mosquito - Walk Around No. 15

de Haviland Mosquito - Walk Around No. 15

Ron MacKay

"Mosquito Walk Around," Squadron/Signal Publications. / / Along with the Spitfire, Hurricane, and Lancaster, the Mosquito completes / the quartet of truly pre-eminent British military aircraft, whose marriage to / the Rolls-Royce Merlin aero engine granted the RAF a platform from which to / properly and fully prosecute the WWII air war. Rolls-Royce fighter aircraft / engines were named after birds of prey; Eagle, Merlin, Griffon, et cetera. / / FEATURES: Filled with specifications, facts, and pictures. A very interesting / book that, by putting the Info w/Pictures, is Educational as well. / / SPECS: 80 Pages - 11" x 8.25" / tjt 12/7/99

1/01/1998

FLYING THE "WOODEN WONDER"

Volume 1, Issue 6, 1971, Air International

HA Taylor

Recollections of the de Havilland Mosquito in the "Viewed from the Cockpit" series by H A Taylor.

Everywhere without delay

Number 189, April 1997, Flypast magazine

When No 3 (Long Range) Ferry Unit was renumbered as 167 Squadron in 1953 the above motto was most appropriate

Mosquito No.1

Number 60, July 1986, Flypast magazine

The career of the prototype Mosquito and how it managed to survive and found a museum

Type Report: Mosquito and Tiger Moth

Number 33, April 1984, Flypast magazine

Our new series on the more popular preserved aircraft continues with the Mosquito and Tiger Moth.

Swedish internees

Volume 4, Issue 12, 1976, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Torbjorn Olausson

Torbjorn Olausson opens an account of British aircraft forced down in Sweden during World War Two

Mosquitos Bite at Night

Number 306, January 2007, Flypast magazine

Ken Wright

Australians Jack Palmer and Jack Rayner formed a close-knit intruder Mosquito crew - Ken Wright describes their exploits.

From the Sublime...

Number 319, February 2008, Flypast magazine

The Mosquito variant was the target-tug Mk.39, possibly the ugliest of the breed.

'Aussie' Mossies

Number 319, February 2008, Flypast magazine

Jim Grant

Australia produced home-grown 'Wooden Wonders' as Jim Grant explains.

Last 'Wings'

Number 319, February 2008, Flypast magazine

The pedigree of the ill-fated RR299, the UK's last flying Mosquito.

Artful ‘Mossies’

Number 340, November 2009, Flypast magazine

Glenn Sands

Glenn Sands presents a portfolio of RAAF Mosquito nose-art.

Men behind the medals: Night Fighter Navigator Ace: Nat Addison

Number 188, March 1997, Flypast magazine

Ralph Graham

Ralph Graham looks at the career of a night fighter radar operator from early days with Blenheims through to the superlative Mosquito,

Mosquito Update: No 10

Volume 36, Issue 04, 2008, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

A progress report on BobJens's rebuild of his Mosquito B.35 in Canada, as well as an update on Jerry Yagen's FB.26

Murder by Mosquito

Volume 36, Issue 03, 2008, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Marshall Wainwright

Marshall Wainwright investigates an intriguing tale of greed, deception, murder - and an ex-surplus RAF de Havilland Mosquito in sun- bleached post-war California

Mosquito Update

Volume 35, Issue 01, 2007, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Jack Meadows

A progress report by Jack Meadows on the rebuilding of Bob Jens's de Havilland Mosquito

Airfile 22 - Post-war RAF FB.6

Volume 9 Issue 2, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

Paul Lucas

Describes the colour schemes and markings of post-war RAF Mosquito FB.6s – with illustrations by Peter Scott

Malta's Maritime Mossies

Volume 9 Issue 2, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

Tony O’Toole

Mmodifies Revell’s 1/48 scale Mosquito B.IV kit in to a Fleet Air Arm Tropicalised Mk 25

Mosquito Modelling Manual

Volume 8 Issue 3, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

Dave Brown

Concludes his super-detailing and conversion of the old 1/32 scale Revell Mosquito B.IV in to an FB.V

Mosquito Modelling Manual De Havilland Mosquito FB.VI: Part One

Volume 8 Issue 2, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

Dave Brown

Goes to town to super-detail the old 1/32 scale Revell Mosquito B.IV, converting it into an FB.VI in the process...

Norse Moskito!

Volume 5 Issue 6, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

Jens Brandal

Describes how he modelled the Tamiya 1/48 scale Mosquito in post-war Royal Norwegian Air Force service... with profiles by Nils Mathisud

The tale of two Mossies

Volume 3 Issue 12, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

Nick Greenall

Builds a pair of Tamiya 1/48 scale Mosquito FB VIs – a Gestapo HQ bomber and a Banff Wing striker

Wooden Wonder'

Volume 3 Issue 4, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

John McIllmurray

Builds the first Mosquito PR Mk I to enter RAF service using the exclusive to MAM readers, 1/72 scale, resin conversion set. See p50 to obtain this exclusive set

Camouflage & Markings: Mosquito PR Mk I and B Mk IV series (i)

Volume 3 Issue 4, Military Aircraft Monthly (was Model Aircraft Monthly )

Paul Lucas

Describes the colour schemes and markings of the first, short-nacelled Mosquitoes to enter RAF service, whilst Jon Freeman provides colour illustrations of their non-standard finishes

Personal Album

Volume 4, Issue 05, 1976, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Our selection this month comes from an album submitted by Mr AL Homersham of Epson, Surrey, and features aircraft seen in the middle east during 1946-48

Braking the Mosquito

Volume 58, Issue 12, 1996, Air Pictorial

Tony Buttler

Some wartime experiments on the Mossie related by Tony Buttler.

Image of Merlin Power: The Growl Behind Air Power in World War II

Merlin Power: The Growl Behind Air Power in World War II

Victor Bingham

The Rolls-Royce Merlin is considered by many to be the most outstanding liquid-cooled reciprocating piston engine of World War II. It powered the majority of Allied aircraft in Europe, including British and American designs. This book examines the origins of the engine's development from its predecessor, the Kestrel, through its single-stage conception to its two-speed, two-stage final form. Twenty-two Merlin powered aircraft are then examined in depth with examinations of development, design, construction and eventual operation. Wonderful design drawings by Lyndon Jones are themselves masterpieces. Included amongst the aircraft described in the book are the Avro Lancaster, Lincoln and York, the de Havilland Mosquito and Hornet, the Bristol Beaufighter II and IV, the Hawker Hurricane and Supermarine Spitfire, the North American Mustang, the Handley Page Halifax, the Curtiss P40 Kittyhawk and the Vickers Wellington.

Image of Modelling the De Havilland Mosquito (Modelling Guides)

Modelling the De Havilland Mosquito (Osprey Modelling)

Roy Sutherland

First entering service in 1941 the legendary 'all-wooden' Mosquito was one of the best twin-engined aircraft of its size to see action in World War II. The addition of radar turned the Mosquito into the RAF's premier night fighter, and it achieved great success in the defence of Britain, with some 600 raiders and 600 V1 rockets falling to its guns between 1942 and 1945. The design's superb performance, and ability to escape interception by enemy fighters also made the Mosquito the ideal choice for the RAF's photographic reconnaissance force. This wide range of roles across multiple theatres and air forces are all reflected in the variety of kits built and colour schemes shown throughout this book.

Image of Mosquito Fighter/Fighter-Bomber Units of World War 2 (Osprey Combat Aircraft 9)

Mosquito Fighter/Fighter-Bomber Units of World War 2 (Osprey Combat Aircraft 9)

Martin Bowman

The second volume in the trilogy of Combat Aircraft titles devoted to de Havilland's 'wooden wonder', this book focuses on the Mosquito fighter/fighter-bomber variants, and their users. From its earliest development phase, the aircraft was considered as much a fighter as a bomber, and this was duly reflected when the original 1940 Air Ministry order for 50 Mosquito bombers was modified to 20 bombers and 30 fighters. This volume is the first of its kind exclusively dedicated to the fighter/fighter-bomber variants of de Havilland's classic World War II (1939-1945) aircraft.

27/11/1998

Image of De Havilland Mosquito (Combat Legends)

De Havilland Mosquito (Combat Legends)

Robert Jackson

The Wooden Wonder - the nickname of one of the finest and most elegant airplanes to have been developed during Word War II. Apart from being very fast and versatile, the Mosquito had the added bonus of wooden construction; this was of great significance during the early wartime years when Britain's defense industry was running short of raw materials and skills to manufacture in steel and alloy. Working with wood utilized a large body of hitherto under-employed skilled carpenters and wood was more readily available than metal. The first Mosquito to join the Royal Air Force was a photoreconnaissance Mk I in 1941. It soon became apparent that there was great potential in this Merlin-powered design and before the War had ended it was flying as a fast light bomber, a night fighter and a pathfinder on night bombing raids deep into Germany. Over 7,500 aircraft were built.

Image of Mosquito Bomber/Fighter-Bomber Units 1942-1945 (Osprey Combat Aircraft 4)

Mosquito Bomber/Fighter-Bomber Units 1942-1945 (Osprey Combat Aircraft 4)

Martin Bowman

Truly an example of engineering ingenuity born out of the desperation of war, the legendary 'all-wooden' Mosquito was perhaps the best twin-engined fighter-bomber of its size to see action in World War II (1939-1945). The first bomber variant to enter service was the B Mk IV, initial examples of which were issued to No 2 Group's No 105 Sqn at Swanton Morley, in Norfolk, in November 1941. Considerably faster than the unit's previous Blenheim Mk IVs, powered by inline rather than radial engines, and made of wood instead of metal alloy, the Mosquito initially proved a challenging mount for both air and groundcrew alike.

15/11/1997

Image of De Havilland Mosquito 38 -Pilot's Notes (Pilot's Notes Collection)

De Havilland Mosquito 38 -Pilot's Notes (Pilot's Notes Collection)

Air Ministry

A series of books that provide, for the first time, the detailed information every pilot needs to know about the aircraft they are flying. Each book in the series covers all aspects of a popular aircraft type and is illustrated throughout with photographs and diagrams.

1/04/2004

Image of De Havilland Mosquito: An Illustrated History

De Havilland Mosquito (Illustrated History (Crecy))

Stewart Howe

The first volume in the two volume set traces the history of the Mosquito from its first flight in November 1940 through to its production and many variants. The aircraft's varied post-war uses are outlined in roles ranging from oil prospecting and air racing to aerial survey. Told in pictures with extended captions and two colour sections, this reprinted volume 1 combines with the new volume 2 to present over 1,000 photographs, making them essential reading for any Mosquito enthusiast.

1/04/2004

Image of Mosquito Aces of World War 2 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Mosquito Aces of World War 2 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Andrew Thomas

The Mosquito developed into one of the most versatile aircraft of World War 2, entering service with Fighter Command in early 1942. The 'Mossie' was soon defending raids on Britain's Cathedral cities and became an integral part of the country's night defences. Its airborne radar gave it the ability to 'see' the enemy at night, and its speed and devastating fire power made it the finest nightfighter deployed by any side during World War 2. This book examines the infamous Mosquito, the nightfighter that was used by many leading RAF, Commonwealth and American aces.

10/10/2005

Image of De Havilland Mosquito (Classic Wwii Aviation)

De Havilland Mosquito (Classic Wwii Aviation)

Edward Shacklady

The de Havilland Mosquito was the non-conformist among aircraft of World War Two as its ingenious wooden construction was revolutionary.

Like most of the world’s greatest combat aircraft the Mosquito owed nothing to official sponsorship and its appearance relied totally on the dogged perseverance of its designers, Geoffrey de Havilland and C. C. Walker. 

Conceived originally in 1938 as a fast, highly maneuverable, yet unarmed day bomber, the Mosquito did not get official recognition until March 1940 when an order for fifty was given by the British Air Ministry.

It soon proved to be an outstanding aircraft and quickly established a reputation for excellent flying qualities, an unequalled talent for destroying pin-point targets, and for having, by a large margin, the lowest loss rate of any aircraft in service with Bomber Command.

Its versatility made it unique and the Mosquito was successful in such varied roles as a high and low-level day and night fighter, long-range day and night-fighter, fighter-bomber, minelayer, pathfinder, rocket-armed ground attack and high and low-level photo-reconnaissance aircraft. 

13/11/2005

Image of Mosquito: The Illustrated History

Mosquito: The Illustrated History

Philip J Birtles

Alongside the Spitfire and Lancaster, the Mosquito is one of the most famous RAF aircraft of World War II. In this illustrated history, the design, development and production of the Wooden Wonder are described in detail. A survey of surviving Mosquitos is also included.

1/01/2000

Image of A SEPARATE LITTLE WAR: The Banff Coastal Command Strike Wing Versus the Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe 1944-1945

A SEPARATE LITTLE WAR: The Banff Coastal Command Strike Wing Versus the Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe 1944-1945

Andrew Bird

Every day for nine months from September 1944 to the end of the war, young British, Commonwealth and Norwegian airmen flew from Banff aerodrome in northern Scotland in their Mosquitoes and Beaufighters to target the German U-Boats, merchantmen and freighters plying along the coast and in the fjords and leads of southwest Norway, encountering the Luftwaffe and flakships every step of the way.

This Scottish strike wing fought in some of the bitterest and bloodiest attacks of the war, all at very low level and at close quarters. Their contribution to winning the war was crucial and while the cost in precious lives and equipment was in the same proportion as Bomber Command, they inflicted far greater damage to the enemy in relation to their losses.

With Group Captain The Hon. Max Aitken, DSO DFC as station commander, Banff was eventually to become the base for a total of six Mosquito squadrons (including 235, 248 and 143), together with B Flight of the elite 333 Norwegian Squadron, and would team up on missions with the nearby Dallachy Beaufighter strike wing (404 RCAF, 455 RAAF, 489 RNZAF and 144 Squadrons).

A Separate Little War, then, is a well researched and detailed history of a microcosm of Coastal Command. Supported by many photographs, maps and charts, the vast majority never published before, the author has drawn on the personal accounts of, amongst others, British and Norwegian pilots, ground crew and civilians which augment the official sources, to give a compelling, accurate and fascinating depiction of an aerodrome at war.

It is a subject which will be of great interest and value to the general reader and to those students of the Luftwaffe, Kriegsmarine, RAF and former Commonwealth Air Forces, the Polish Air Force and of maritime air operations during World War Two.?

1/08/2003

Image of DOWN TO EARTH: A Fighter Pilot's Experiences of Surviving Dunkirk, The Battle of Britain, Dieppe and D-Day

DOWN TO EARTH: A Fighter Pilot's Experiences of Surviving Dunkirk, The Battle of Britain, Dieppe and D-Day

Kenneth Butterworth McGlashan

In Down to Earth, Squadron Leader McGlashan reflects honestly on his enthralling and diverse RAF career, one that began with the rag and tube of Hawker biplanes in 1939 and closed in the jet era of the late 1950s.

Shot down over the beaches of Dunkirk in heated aerial combat, we follow the footsteps of the nineteen year old along the debris-littered sands and beyond. From the protection of vulnerable convoys to the pioneering days of night-fighting and airborne radar, McGlashan is in the midst of the action.

Flying in support of the ill-fated landing at Dieppe and on clandestine night operations before D-Day, he takes an active role in some of the RAF's most significant operations of World War Two. Interspersed throughout are tales of camaraderie and humour. Away from the front line, McGlashan was seconded to BOAC to fly airliners out of Cairo, tasked to ferry all manner of aircraft at the war's end and serve Cyprus at the height of a very nasty campaign.

It is a journey of tremendous diversity, punctuated by a series of close calls and inevitable losses. Half a century later, retired and living in Australia, Kenneth McGlashan is drawn back to 1940 with the discovery of his crashed Hurricane surfacing through the sands of Dunkirk. In an emotional pilgrimage, he is reunited with the steed of his youth and its bullet-ridden cockpit. In spite of the many dangers he faced and despite evidence to the contrary, McGlashan regarded himself as nothing more than just another pilot; an ordinary man in extraordinary times.

Of the 3,000 allied airmen who flew in the Battle of Britain, only three percent could lay claim to the title of 'ace', Squadron Leader Kenneth McGlashan AFC always felt great honor in being counted amongst the 97 percent.

Zupp's writing has featured in many aviation magazines including Flypast, Flightpath and Rag and Tube.

REVIEWS

"There are some autobiographies that stand head and shoulders above the others, and this is one of them!... Beautifully written..."October 2007, Flypast magazine

1/09/2007

Seventh Heaven

Number 166, May 1995, Flypast magazine

The Concluding Part Of The Ata Series - A Feast Of Mosquitoes.

Mosquito Wrecks And Relics:Part 2

Number 166, May 1995, Flypast magazine

Continuing The Round-Up Of Mosquito 'Bits And Pieces'.

Ranger Mosquitos

Number 112, November 1990, Flypast magazine

A mission into Europe looking for trouble and finding it!

Balkan Mosquitos

Number 112, November 1990, Flypast magazine

The service career of the Mosquito in Yugoslavia.

Ranger Mosquitos

Number 112, November 1990, Flypast magazine

A mission into Europe looking for trouble and finding it!

Night to Remember

Number 112, November 1990, Flypast magazine

Tom Bennett

Kicking-off our tribute to the Mosquito, Tom Bennett starts a two-part story from his days with 617 Squadron.

Oboe'Mosquitoes

Number 93, April 1989, Flypast magazine

Ray Edwards

Pin-point bombing by 'Oboe'equipped Mosquitoes, Ray Edwards relates.

Type Report

Number 38, September 1984, Flypast magazine

Update on de Havilland favourites, the Tiger Moth and Mosquito. Preservation News

Mosquito in Action

Number 37, August 1984, Flypast magazine

JR Goodman

In part two of his article on life in a Mosquito Bomber Squadron, Grp CaptJ R Goodman describes the task of low level target marking.

Mosquito in Action

Number 36, July 1984, Flypast magazine

JR Goodman

In the first of a two-part article Grp Capt J R Goodman recalls life on a Mosquito Bomber squadron.

Warplanes in Civvies: de Havilland Mosquito

Number 11, June 1982, Flypast magazine

Donald Hannah

In his series on military designs that have seen service in a civil role Donald Hannah reports on the de Havilland Mosquito.

Mosquito Graveyard

Number 10, May 1982, Flypast magazine

Stuart Howe

Stuart Howe relates the tale of three airworthy Mosquitos which were allowed to fall to pieces at Thruxton in i.he '60s.

Bigger Bite

Number 236, March 2001, Flypast magazine

Jarrod Cotter

Jarrod Cotter Investigates The Mosquito Xviii 'tsetse' Flying Artillery.

Black Monday

Number 236, March 2001, Flypast magazine

Halvor Sperbund

A Fascinating Account Of A Mosquito Raid On A Crippled German Cargo Ship Grounded In Leirvik, Norway, As Relayed By Halvor Sperbund.

Stalin's Mosquito

Number 235, February 2001, Flypast magazine

Hans-Heiri Stapfer

The Ussr Received A Single Dh Mosquito During World War Two. Hans-Heiri Stapfer Reports How The Scientific Research Institute Of The Air Force Destroyed It.

Happy Endings

Number 214, May 1999, Flypast magazine

Franz Kahlhammer Was Lucky To Escape With His Life Following A Tussle With A Night-Stalking Mosquito. Chris Goss Explains That It Was 55 Years Before The 'Mossie' Crew Appreciated Their Luck.

Image of SHIPBUSTER: Mosquito Mk XVII

SHIPBUSTER: Mosquito Mk XVII

Alex Crawford

One of the rarest and least documented versions of the versatile de Havilland Mosquito, the Mk XVIII "Tse-tse" was armed with a 57mm gun. Originally intended for anti-tank duties, the 17 airframes produced served instead with Coastal Command on anti-ship and anti-submarine missions. This book tells the full story of the development and operational service of the Tse-tse (so-called because it was like a mosquito but with a bigger sting!), and is fully illustrated with photos, scale plans, detail drawings and color profiles.

REVIEWS

"...an invaluable reference source for aircraft enthusiasts and historians..."Cybermodeler

Image of John 'Cats-Eyes' Cunningham (Airlife Classics)

John 'Cat'S-Eyes' Cunningham: The Aviation Legend (Airlife Classics)

John Golley

John Cunningham's wartime fame as an outstanding night-fighter ace was followed by a long career in test flying during the exciting post-war period when the jet engine was developed to power both military and civil aircraft. As chief test pilot for the de Havilland Aircraft Company he was at the leading edge of the quest for supersonic flight and in the development of the Comet, the world's first jet airliner. As "Cat's-eyes Cunningham" he became a household name during the bombing blitz of Britain, symbolizing the growing effectiveness of the RAF's embryonic defending night-fighter force. Few knew of his major role in perfecting the operational use of radar interception. He was the first squadron pilot in the world to shoot down an enemy aircraft using radar. His partnership with Jimmy Rawnsley, his navigator, provides a fascinating insight into the air war under the cover of darkness.

Image of De Havilland Mosquito (Crowood Aviation)

De Havilland Mosquito (Crowood Aviation Series)

Martin Bowman

De Havilland's Mosquito is a legendary airplane. Conceived in 1938 as a high speed unarmed bomber, its adaptability saw it used as a nightfighter, bomber photoreconnaissance airplane, high speed courier aircraft, target marker and anti-shipping strike aircraft. Built mainly from wood, the design team produced a masterpiece.

Image of 2nd Tactical Airforce: V. 4: Squadrons, Camouflage Markings, Weapons and Tactics 1943 - 45

2nd Tactical Airforce: V. 4: Squadrons, Camouflage Markings, Weapons and Tactics 1943 - 45

Christopher Shores

This superb new book completes the in-depth analysis of the 2nd TAF's operations from its initial formation in 1943 through to the ultimate defeat of Germany in May 1945. The informative text is interspersed with rare personal accounts from pilots as well as mini-biographies and specialist text boxes on key missions. This fourth volume includes detailed coverage of areas such as camouflage and markings and ordnance systems as carried by the wide range of aircraft deployed by 2nd TAF, and which supplements much of the material in the first three volumes.The authors have uncovered a significant amount of rare and previously unpublished material which will delight modellers around the world. Meticulous listings of all wings, commanding officers, bases and squadrons are provided, along with brief histories of each. There is also a dedicated section on Group Support Units and Repair Units, as well as a valuable section on tactics used by 2nd TAF arranged by type and role. Supplemented by fabulous colour artwork throughout, and rare pilots' albums, this is essential volume for all military aviation enthusiasts.

Image of 2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 2: Breakout to Bodenplatte, July 1944 to January 1945

2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 2: Breakout to Bodenplatte, July 1944 to January 1945

Chris Thomas

It has been more than 30 years since the original and highly acclaimed history of 2nd Tactical Air Force was first published, and it has been long out of print. Now at last, this book is a completely rewritten and greatly expanded account of this important command's vital contribution to the Invasion of Normandy and the defeat of the forces of the Third Reich in Western Europe. The 2nd TAF, equipped with rocket- and bomb-carrying Typhoons, Tempests, Spitfires, Mosquitos, Mustangs and medium bombers, flew ground-attack and tank-busting missions in support of Montgomery's 21st Army Group as it advanced through Normandy and northwest Europe in 1944-45. The medium bomber units struck at enemy transport, ammunition dumps, and communication targets. The 2nd TAF comprised British, Canadian, Polish, Czech, Norwegian, French, South African, Australian, and New Zealand crews. This second volume covers the breakout from Normandy, the advance across the Low Countries, and the German ripostes in the Ardennes and Operation 'Bodenplatte' in the winter that followed.

Image of Mosquito

Mosquito

Bill Sweetman

COFFEE TABLE SIZED TECHNICAL BOOK ON THE HAWKER DE HAVILLAND MOSQUITO. BEAUTIFUL ILLUSTRATIONS AND CUT-AWAYS OF THIS CLASSIC AIRCRAFT.

Image of Night Fighters

Night Fighters: A Development and Combat History

Bill Gunston

From its beginnings during the First World War, the role of the dedicated night fighter aircraft and its pilots has evolved almost out of recognition. The Second World War proved to be a hot house for development in aircraft technology and fighting tactics, honing the night fighter into a deadly combat machine. Featuring an updated glossary and appendix, and with new illustrations throughout, this new edition reflects the massive changes in technology, specifically today's radars and air-to-air missiles, and in tactics in recent years. Legendary aviation author Bill Gunston shows the problems of tracking aerial targets by radar, and the even greater problems of guiding a fighter into the right patch of sky at night to make an interception. As well as being an accurately detailed technical account of the problems and their resolution, the book is also an exciting narrative that actually puts the reader into the cockpit.

Image of Mosquito Pathfinder

Mosquito Pathfinder

Albert / Ian Smith

Having suffered the devastating effects of the Manchester blitz, sixteen year old Salford lad Albert Smith signed up to join the RAF not thinking he would be lucky enough to complete 90 operations. His first tour of 38 operations as a Wellington navigator over Germany and North Africa was soon continued when he volunteered for Pathfinder Mosquitoes with 109 squadron at Little Soughton. The Oboe navigation system was in its infancy and as one of only two Oboe squadrons, Smith was soon in the air illuminating bombing targets. Over 50 operations, Smith relives successes and failures with the new target marking system; triumphs and disappointments, mission aborts and successes, and all the fears and nervousness entailed in being the first aircraft over a heavily defended target. His narrative, interspersed with extracts from official Bomber Command records combine to give both the official and, possibly more importantly, the human stories of the air war over Germany and beyond.

Image of Mosquitopanik!: Mosquito fighters and fighter bomber operations in the Second World War (Aviation)

MOSQUITOPANIK! (Aviation)

Martin Bowman

In September 1942 the British public was told of the new aircraft which would save them from Luftwaffe terror raids and would be equipped with AI radar ETH the de Havilland Mosquito; the aircraft which came to be known as the wooden wonder. This fascinating book tells the story of these Mossies and their crews and of the heroic work they did in preventing the Luftwaffe from inflicting even greater terror and damage on the civil population. Superbly illustrated, Mosquitopanik! is a graphic and comprehensive account of the fighter activities of this legendary aircraft from 1942 until the end of the War.

Image of The Reich Intruders: RAF Light Bomber Raids in World War II

THE REICH INTRUDERS: RAF Light Bomber Raids in World War II

Martin Bowman

This is the story of 2 Group RAF during World War II. Much of it is told by the men who flew the Blenheim, Boston, Mitchell and Mosquito aircraft that carried out many daring daylight and night-time raids on vitally important targets in Nazi occupied Europe and Germany. These were not the famous thousand bomber raids that hit the wartime headlines, but low-level, fast-moving surprise raids flown by small formations of fleet-footed and skilfully piloted twin-engine light bombers.Their targets were usually difficult to locate and heavily defended because of their strategic importance to the Nazis. 2 Group also played a vital part in the invasion of Europe both before and after D-Day. Often they would fly at wave-top height across the English Channel or North Sea to avoid detection and then hedge-hop deep into enemy territory to deliver their precision attack. Enemy fighters and anti-aircraft fire were a constant risk. This is a remarkable story of skill and bravery by a little known branch of the RAF.

Image of 2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 3: From the Rhine to Victory, January to May 1945

2nd Tactical Air Force, Vol. 3: From the Rhine to Victory, January to May 1945

Christopher Shores

It is more than 30 years since the original and highly-acclaimed history of 2nd Tactical Air Force was first published, and it has been long out of print. Now at last, a completely rewritten and greatly expanded account of this important command's vital contribution to the Invasion of Normandy and the defeat of the forces of the Third Reich in Western Europe has been prepared. The 2nd TAF, equipped with rocket- and bomb-carrying Typhoons, Tempests, Spitfires, Mosquitos, Mustangs, and medium bombers, flew ground attack and tank-busting missions in support of Montgomery's 21st Army Group as it advanced through Normandy and northwest Europe in 1944-45. The medium bomber units struck at enemy transport, ammunition dumps, and communication targets. The 2nd TAF comprized British, Canadian, Polish, Czech, Norwegian, French, South African, Australian, and New Zealand crews.

Image of Mosquito to Berlin: Story of Bertie Boulter Dfc, One of Bennett's Pathfinders

MOSQUITO TO BERLIN: Story of 'Bertie' Boulter DFC, One of Bennett's Pathfinders

Peter Bodle

When Don Bennett formed the Pathfinder squadrons in 1942, the majority of the chosen pilots were highly experienced aircrew who had learned their skills in the opening years of World War Two. Some, however, were exceptions and found themselves flying with this elite band with no previous combat experience. 'Bertie' Boulter was one such pilot. He was born in Saskatchewan, on 15 April 1923, the son of British emigrants. When his father died in 1938 the family returned to their native home in Norwich. On 3 January 1942 'Bertie' was accepted for pilot training with the RAF and found himself back in Canada learning to fly. Upon his return to England, and with 'exceptional' describing his flying abilities, he was posted to No 11 Radio School at Hooton Park as a staff pilot flying Avro Ansons and the lugubrious Botha, in which wireless operators were learning their trade. After a short spell at No. 12 Advanced Flying Unit, he was posted to No 128 Pathfinder Squadron in October 1944, based at Wyton and flying the legendary de Havilland Mosquito XX. He was now in the thick of Bomber Commands destruction of Germany's industrial centres and communications system. His first mission was to Wiesbaden, followed by raids on Hanover and Cologne. November saw the first of his nineteen visits to Berlin and the first bale-out. Flying at 7,000 ft, with seriously malfunctioning Merlins, Bertie, and his navigator were forced to abandon the aircraft and landed safely close to the front line but unsure of which side of it they were. Eventually he arrived in Dunkerque, where he boarded an MTB for his return to Wyton. Bertie was forced to bale out once more, in January 1945, when he was forced to abandon his aircraft near his home base because of the dense fog that was covering all of Eastern Britain. This was on his return from a raid on Berlin made by 36 aircraft, twelve of which failed to return. Boulter's career with the RAF continued after the war with various units including Met. Flights and liaison duties. His log-book records that he flew 48 combat operations during which 128,000 lb of ordnance was dropped on enemy territory. Bertie Boulter was still flying a Stearman biplane fifty years later and he still meets regularly with survivors of the Pathfinder squadrons.

Image of SILVERED WINGS: The Memoirs of  Air Vice-Marshal Sir John Severne KCVO OBE AFC DL

SILVERED WINGS: The Memoirs of Air Vice-Marshal Sir John Severne KCVO OBE AFC DL

John Severne

John Severne joined the RAF in 1944 and gained his wings two months after World War II ended. This book captures the author's great passion for flying, whether it be in jet-fighters, light aircraft, helicopters or making model planes and gives details of his long a illustrious career. His first posting was to No 264 Night Fighter Squadron flying the de Havilland Mosquito. On a flying instructor's course at the Central Flying School, he flew a Lancaster, Spitfire and his first jet - the Vampire. Posted to Germany as a flight commander on a Venom squadron, he was awarded an Air Force Cross for landing an aircraft that had caught fire. As a Squadron Leader, he became Equerry to the Duke of Edinburgh. Then followed a period as chief instructor on Britain's first supersonic fighter, the English Electric Lightning. Later he became 'Wing Commander Ops' at the joint HQ of Middle East Command where he was involved in counter-terrorist operations in Aden. As Station Commander of RAF Kinloss, he was responsible for the introduction of the Nimrod in 1971 and at the height of the Cold War when these new anti-submarine aircraft were a vital part of Britain's defense.

Image of SQUADRON LEADER TOMMY BROOM DFC**: The Legendary Pathfinder Mosquito Navigator

SQUADRON LEADER TOMMY BROOM DFC**: The Legendary Pathfinder Mosquito Navigator

Tom Evans

Tommy Broom is one of the RAF's most legendary and popular heroes of World War II. Tommy completed 83 operations during the war and teamed up with a namesake as his pilot, Ivor Broom - they became known as the 'Flying Brooms' and completed 57 operations together.

Image of BRITAIN'S GREATEST AIRCRAFT

BRITAIN'S GREATEST AIRCRAFT

Robert Jackson

During the last century the British aircraft industry created and produced many outstanding airplanes. These aircraft were world leaders in advanced technology, utilizing inventions by British engineers and scientists such as radar, the jet engine, the ejector seat and vertical take-off and landing. This book describes the design-history, development and operational careers of twenty-two legendary military and civil airplanes. Each one has played a significant part in aviation history.

Sopwith Camel, SE.5, Bristol F2B Fighter and the Airco DH4 were all great successes in the relatively early days of flight. In the thirties the Bristol Bulldog fighter was an outstanding export success and the Short 'C' Class flying boat, later to become the Sunderland of World War II fame, pioneered the long-distance routes to the Empire. The pugnacious foreign policy of Hitler's Reich rung sudden alarm bells, rapid advances in fighting aircraft for the RAF became a premium objective. The brilliant Geodic construction of the Vickers Wellington bomber helped it survive terrible punishment throughout World War II, both the Hawker Hurricane and the Supermarine Spitfire saved England from invasion and the Bristol Beaufighter, de Havilland Mosquito and Avro Lancaster took the war to enemy soil.

The Gloster Meteor became the word's first operational jet fighter and the English Electric Canberra became the RAF's first jet bomber and was manufactured under license in the USA as the Martin B-57. In post-war years the Vickers Viscount became the world's first turboprop airliner and eventually became Britain's best selling commercial aircraft, whilst the de Havilland Comet became the world's first jet airliner. Despite Britain's recessionary years in the 50s and early 60s, military success came with the beautiful Hawker Hunter, the super-sonic Fairey Delta experimental aircraft that broke the World Air Speed Record and the Vickers Valiant that pioneered the operational techniques to deliver Britain's nuclear deterrent. Later, there followed the Mach 2 English Electric Lightning and the ill-fated TSR-2, the cancellation of which is still regarded as one of the greatest mistakes ever made in British aviation history. Finally, the Harrier, the world's first vertical take-off and landing jet fighter that is still in service and now only being built in the USA.

Finally the Harrier, the world's first vertical take-off and landing jet fighter, still in service and now being further developed in the USA.

Image of THE MEN WHO FLEW THE MOSQUITO: Compelling Account of the 'Wooden Wonders' Triumphant WW2 Career

THE MEN WHO FLEW THE MOSQUITO: Compelling Account of the 'Wooden Wonders' Triumphant WW2 Career

Martin Bowman

The two-engined Mosquito was one of the classic aircraft of the Second World War. Famously wooden-built, its graceful lines and powerful performance have made it into an airborne icon. Its operational versatility as a fighter, low level bomber and reconnaissance aircraft was unsurpassed.

In this book we get the first-hand crew accounts of a selection of the actions and missions that the 'Mossie' undertook. These include audacious raids on Nazi HQs and Gestapo jails - real precision attacks carried out by ace fliers.

REVIEWS

"...brings to life the courage and will that RAF pilots- certainly all pilots during WWII displayed during every mission...a must have, for this may very well be one of the last books to have first hand stories from the actual men who flew this magnificent plane. "IPMS, 02/2010

Image of Mosquito: Menacing the Reich: Combat Action in the Twin-engine Wooden Wonder of World War II

MOSQUITO: MENACING THE REICH: Combat Action in the Twin-engine Wooden Wonder of World War II

Martin Bowman

This book is full of firsthand accounts from the crews that flew the ‘Mossie’ in its roles as a bomber, long-range reconnaissance and low-level strike aircraft. The author has gathered together many of the most exciting operational reports that cover the period from the type’s introduction until the end of World War II. The text is interwoven with the background history of the personnel and squadrons, the purpose of the operations undertaken and their often devastating results.

Image of A MOST SECRET SQUADRON: The First Full Story of 618 Squadron and its Special Detachment Anti-U-Boat Mosquitos

A MOST SECRET SQUADRON: The First Full Story of 618 Squadron and its Special Detachment Anti-U-Boat Mosquitos

Des Curtis

Des Curtis was one of the founder members of 618 Squadron. Formed within days of the illustrious 617, 618's primary objective was to mount a daylight low-level attack by Mosquitos on the German battleship Tirpitz within hours of the attack on the Ruhr dams. The operation, code named Operation Servant, was given top security classification, to the point where the subject was excluded from the minutes of the meetings of the Chiefs of Staff of the air and naval forces. The author reveals the dilemmas and conflicting priorities existing to the highest levels, setting out in detail the technicalities of developing the 'bouncing bomb'. He also writes first hand about the tactical problems of getting to and from the target; and the tensions and strains endured by the Mosquito crews themselves, as they took the war to the German U-Boats within the sight and safety of their bases.

REVIEWS

"A nicely compiled and presented title that puts the Mosquito into a new perspective and how its crews rose to the missions even when the mission seemed elusive."Cybermodeler.com, 04/2010

Image of Achtung! Moskito!: RAF and USAAF Mosquito Fighters, Fighter-Bombers, and Bombers over the Third Reich 1941-1945

Achtung! Moskito!: RAF and USAAF Mosquito Fighters, Fighter-Bombers, and Bombers over the Third Reich 1941-1945

Martin W Bowman

Much has been written about the Mosquito, but this book features the young pilots and navigators who carried out daring operations against targets in Europe. Their stories are as compelling today as they were over sixty years ago at the height of World War II. The Mosquito was for many the perfect synthesis of power and beauty and arguably the most versatile of all Allied aircraft built during the Second World War. Yet three times the Mosquito project was deleted from Britains future military plans, only to fight its way into the air and turn in performance figures that left fellow aircraft behind and its critics dumbfounded. Altogether, 7,781 examples of the Wooden Wonder would be built in no less than forty-three versions. Bomber, day fighter, night fighter, pathfinder, attack aircraft, trainer, reconnaissance aircraft the Mosquito did it all.

Image of FIGHTER ACES! THE CONSTABLE MAXWELL BROTHERS: Fighter Pilots in Two World Wars

FIGHTER ACES! THE CONSTABLE MAXWELL BROTHERS: Fighter Pilots in Two World Wars (Pen & Sword Aviation Books)

Alex Revell

When Gerald Constable Maxwell was flying as a fighter pilot in World War I, his brother Michael was born. Both went on to have distinguished flying careers in World War II. This is the story of both men and how their paths crossed during the second conflict. Gerald served with distinction with 56 Squadron, one of the crack fighter units of WWI in France. Upon his return to England he became Chief Flying Instructor of No. 1 Fighter and Gunnery School at Turnberry.

In World War II he served as Station Commander at RAF Ford, a night Fighter station near Arundel, one of the most efficient and happy stations in 11 Group. Michael followed in his brother's footsteps and joined 56 Squadron in April 1940 to fly the Hawker Hurricane. During May the squadron was moved to France to assist the fast retreating British and French forces as the Germans rapidly advanced.

On 27 May, he was shot down whilst attacking ten Heinkel 111s on their way to bomb Dunkirk. Fortunately his first contacts upon landing by parachute were French and he managed to find his way to Ostend where he boarded a trawler and crossed the Channel back to Deal. 56 Squadron had by now returned to their English base at North Weald from where they were flying patrols over the French coast and escorting RAF bombers raiding the German positions.

On 8 June, whilst trying to reach returning Blenheims over Le Treport, the Hurricanes were bounced by Bf 109s and again Michael was hit, wounding him in the leg and foot, fortunately he eventually managed a crash landing back at North Weald. During the height of the Battle of Britain Michael was again forced to make a crash landing near Herne Bay which he was lucky to survive as his Hurricane had disintegrated around him. In the autumn of 1941 Michael was posted to 604 Nightfighter Squadron, led by the legendary 'Cat's Eyes' Cunningham flying Beaufighters and eventually Mosquitos.

He was eventually to Command the squadron whose tally of enemy aircraft shot down when he left it had reached 100. This remarkable story includes firsthand combat accounts from both Michael and Gerald and the author has had access to the Constable Maxwell's family records.

Image of NIGHT FIGHTER NAVIGATOR: Beaufighters and Mosquitos in WWII

NIGHT FIGHTER NAVIGATOR: Beaufighters and Mosquitos in WWII

Dennis Gosling

Yorkshireman Dennis Gosling joined the RAF on May 24 1940. Having completed his training he was posted to 219 Squadron flying the night-fighter version of the Beaufighter from Tangmere in 1941. As a navigator, he became part of a two-man team that would endure throughout his first operational tour. In those infant day of radar interception he honed his skills in the night skies above southern England and the English Channel but without a firm kill. On 12 February 1942, he and his pilot were instructed to pick up a brand new aircraft and deliver it to North Africa, flying via Gibraltar, a hazardous flight at extreme range. In March the crew were posted to 1435 Flight of 89 Squadron with the task of defending the besieged island of Malta. The four Beaufighters of the flight flew into a horrific scenario of almost constant bombing raids by the Luftwaffe and Italian Air Force. Because of these raids the damage to aircraft on the ground was devastating and the Flight was often reduced to a single serviceable aircraft. His first success came in April 1942 with a confirmed kill, and then shortly after his 21st birthday on 13 May a triumphant night on the 17th brought 3 certain kills and one damaged enemy aircraft. From being the virgins of the squadron they shot into the record books, his pilot being awarded the DFC

To his disgust, Flight Sergeant Gosling received no award. At this stage he became somewhat embittered by the class system he felt was operated by the RAF. Having endured the torment of constant bombardment, serious stomach complaints (even flying with a bucket in the aircraft) and near starvation he completed his tour and was repatriated to the UK via Brazil and Canada in the Queen Mary. After a spell instructing new night navigators, he joined 604 Squadron and in December 1943 he was promoted to Warrant Officer. February 1944 saw the squadron reequipped with the Mosquito and assignment to 2 Tactical Air Force in preparation for D-Day. Now once again he was flying initially over southern England and the Channel. The squadron became mobile after the landings and were based in various captured airfields in France, but the conditions were so inadequate for operations that the squadron returned to English bases, from where they operated over and beyond the advancing Allied troops. Eventually, after having been awarded a much deserved DFC, he accepted the King's Commission.

This autobiography is written as stated by the author "I want my readers to relive my experiences as they happened to me - to take their hands and have them walk beside me. I want them to feel the joy and the pain, share the laughs and the heartache, take pleasure in the triumphs, agonize with me when things went wrong and understand why my Service years influenced so much of my life." He has succeeded magnificently.

Image of MOSQUITO MAYHEM: de Havilland's Wooden Wonder in Action in WWII

MOSQUITO MAYHEM: de Havilland's Wooden Wonder in Action in WWII

Martin Bowman

"The flak started about four or five minutes before the target and immediately it was apparent that it was intense and extremely accurate. Oboe entailed the pilot flying dead straight and level for ten minutes on the attack run. Suddenly a tremendous flash lit up the sky about 50 yards ahead of our nose and exactly at our altitude. Within a tenth of a second we were through the cloud of dirty yellowish-brown smoke and into the blackness beyond. I shall never forget the spontaneous reaction of both my pilot and myself. We turned our heads slowly and looked long and deep into one another's eyes - no word was spoken - no words were needed."

The Mosquito was probably World War II's most versatile combat aircraft. This book contains hundreds of firsthand accounts from many of the two-man crews who flew in them; pilots and navigators. It portrays the dramatic experiences of flying in its many roles as pathfinder, night fighter, reconnaissance aircraft, precision bombing and low-level ground attack aircraft. It describes many of the RAF's most audacious raids on prime but difficult targets where carpet bombing by heavy bombers was likely to be ineffective and cause unnecessary casualties to civilians. It is a remarkable record of the aircraft and the men that flew them.

Image of MOSQUITO: The Original Multi-Role Combat Aircraft

MOSQUITO: The Original Multi-Role Combat Aircraft

Graham Simons

During the history of aviation there have been very few aircraft that have achieved immediate success when entering front-line service. The de Havilland Mosquito was one such aircraft. It was not designed to an RAF requirement, but was the result of an initiative of the designers and builders to utilize the skills of woodworkers and the relative abundance of wood in the crisis years of World War II. The result was an airplane that could be built quickly, was extremely fast and extremely versatile. The pilots loved it.

This book describes how it was built and utilizes many hitherto unpublished photographs from the design studio and production lines. It illustrates and explains the many different roles that the aircraft took as the war progressed. Fighter, bomber, reconnaissance, night fighter - there were few tasks that this brilliant design could not adopt.

Image of MOSQUITO: The Original Multi-Role Combat Aircraft

MOSQUITO: The Original Multi-Role Combat Aircraft

Graham Simons

During the history of aviation there have been very few aircraft that have achieved immediate success when entering front-line service. The de Havilland Mosquito was one such aircraft. It was not designed to an RAF requirement, but was the result of an initiative of the designers and builders to utilize the skills of woodworkers and the relative abundance of wood in the crisis years of World War II. The result was an airplane that could be built quickly, was extremely fast and extremely versatile. The pilots loved it.

This book describes how it was built and utilizes many hitherto unpublished photographs from the design studio and production lines. It illustrates and explains the many different roles that the aircraft took as the war progressed. Fighter, bomber, reconnaissance, night fighter - there were few tasks that this brilliant design could not adopt.

Mosquito Update No 6

Volume 31, Issue 03, 2003, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Jack Meadows

Jack Meadows reports from Canada on the project to put Mosquito B.35 VR796 back in the air

The Mosquito ... As One Pilot Saw It

Volume 31, Issue 02, 2003, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

David Ogilvy

In Part Two of his series David Ogilvy moves on to the later, heavier marks of the "Wooden Wonder"

The Wooden Warrior

Volume 30, Issue 03, 2002, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

A technical description from the Aircraft Engineering journal of 1943

Mosquito Update No 4

Volume 30, Issue 01, 2002, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Jack Meadows

Jack Meadows reports from Vancouver on the latest progress in putting Mosquito VR796 back in the air

Mosquito Update No 3

Volume 29, Issue 09, 2001, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Jack Meadows

Jack Meadows presents the latest of his regular reports from Vancouver, Canada, on the restoration to airworthiness of de Havilland Mosquito B.35 VR796

Mosquito Update

Volume 29, Issue 03, 2001, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Jack Meadows

Jack Meadows opens a series of reports on a Canadian project to put a D.H. Mosquito back in the air

High Society

Volume 28, Issue 12, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

The Mosquito Aircrew Association is this month's subject

Mosquito

Volume 28, Issue 12, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

TO FLY OR FADE AWAY?. . . and forward to the prospect of another

The Mosquito'S Merlins

Volume 28, Issue 12, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Alec Lumsden

A mark-by-mark rundown of the aircraft's powerplant development, by Alec Lumsden

Plywood Perfection

Volume 28, Issue 12, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Alec Lumsden

Alec Lumsden looks under the skin at the Mosquito's unorthodox construction

Combat Report

Volume 28, Issue 12, 2000, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Three Heinkel He Ills shot down in six minutes by a Mosquito of 151 Sqn

Nocturnal Navigator

Volume 24, Issue 02, 1996, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Ted Hooten

Ted Hooton recounts his metamorphosis from aviation-mad schoolboy to night-fighter Mosquito navigator in the 1940s and 1950s

Dickie, I hardly knew you

Volume 23, Issue 01, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Jack Meadows

Fifty years ago this Christmas a 219 Sqn Mosquito crashed in Belgium. Jack Meadows looks into the mysterious circumstances surrounding the loss

Pickard: Hero Of Amiens

Volume 22, Issue 04, 1994, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

John Maynard

John Maynard continues his three-part biography of Gp Capt P.C. Pickard DSO, DFC

Pickard: hero Of Amiens

Volume 22, Issue 03, 1994, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

John Maynard

To mark the 50th anniversary of the death of Gp Capt. P. C. Pickard DSO** DFC John Maynard begins a three-part biography

Mastering the Mosquito

Volume 21, Issue 10, 1993, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Mike Retallack

Flt Lt Mike Retallack recalls graduating from the Prentice to the Mosquito in the 1950s

The last Of the few

Volume 21, Issue 07, 1993, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

In the concluding part of his No shots please, we're British series, Roger Anthoine describes the last moments of two RAF Mosquitoes

Flying Was Still fun -part 5

Volume 21, Issue 02, 1993, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Jack Meadows

Wg Cdr jack Meadows DFC AFC AE recalls flying 219 Sqn Mosquitoes in France during the winter of 1944-45

Flying was still fun -part 4

Volume 21, Issue 01, 1993, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Jack Meadows

Wg Cdr Jack Meadowsrecalls flying 219 Sqn Mosquitoes in France during the winter of 1944

Flying Was Still fun -part 3

Volume 20, Issue 11, 1992, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Jack Meadows

Wg Cdr Jack Meadows recalls flying Mosquitoes with the 2nd Tactical Air Force

RR299 refurbished

Volume 20, Issue 09, 1992, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Richard Paver

Richard Paver reports on the restoration of British Aerospace's de Havilland Mosquito

Preservation profile

Volume 20, Issue 04, 1992, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Kermit Weeks's Mosquito B.35 RS712/M35MK, based in Florida, is this month's subject

The Tsetse and the U-boat -part 2

Volume 19, Issue 06, 1991, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Roy Nesbit

Roy Nesbit concludes his account of the wartime submarine-hunting exploits of the de Havilland "Tsetse" Mosquito

The Tsetse and the U-boat -part 1

Volume 19, Issue 05, 1991, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Roy Nesbit

The Tsetse version of the de Havilland Mosquito was a formidable submarine-hunter. Roy Nesbit opens a two-part account of its exploits, seen from both ends of its 57mm gun

TA634 on target

Volume 19, Issue 01, 1991, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

de Havilland Mosquito B.35 TA634 was rolled out of the Mosquito Aircraft Museum at Salisbury Ha/I on October 14 at the end of a 10yr restoration to static display condition, Thirsk recounts the history of TA 634, now painted to represent ML 963 of 571 Squadron

Freeman's folly

Volume 18, Issue 12, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Stuart Howe

50yr after its first flight, Stuart Howe traces the history of the first prototype D.H.98 Mosquito, W4050. preserved today at Salisbury Hall in Hertfordshire

A plague of Mosquitoes

Volume 18, Issue 10, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Lewis Brandon

Sqn Ldr Lewis Brandon DSO DFC & Bar recounts the work of the radar-equipped Mosquito night-fighters of WO Group RAF

No shots please, we're British -part 2

Volume 18, Issue 09, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Roger Anthoine

Roger Anthoine continues his series on the RAF aircraft which crashed or landed safely in neutral Switzerland during the Second World War with the story of the PR Mosquito which, in August 1942, became the first Allied aircraft to fall into Swiss hands

Personal album -military

Volume 18, Issue 08, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Richard Livermore

Photographs of post-war RAF de Havilland Mosquitoes taken by Richard Livermore

Mossies over the Med -part 3

Volume 17, Issue 10, 1989, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Fred Adkin

Accidents always happen in threes... or fours, as FredAdkin relates in the third and final part of his recollections of serving with No 13 Sqn RAF in the Middle East and Mediterranean during 1948-51

Mossies over the Med -part 2

Volume 17, Issue 09, 1989, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Fred Adkin

Former RAF airframe fitter Fred Adkin continues his three-pan recollection of service with No 13 Squadron RAF in the Middle East and Mediterranean during 1948-51

Mossies over the Med -part 1

Volume 17, Issue 08, 1989, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Fred Adkin

Former RAF airframe fitter Fred Adkin begins his three-part recollection of service with No 13 Squadron in the Middle East and Mediterranean

Personal album

Volume 16, Issue 07, 1988, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Ken Wright

military Selection of photographs of Halifaxes and Mosquitoes taken in 1945 and 1951 by Ken Wright

Mosquito outing

Volume 13, Issue 03, 1985, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Richard Wilson

Photographer Richard Wilson flew in the British Aerospace Mosquito T Mk 3 RR299 last year. He secured some unusual photographs and gives a potted biography of the aircraft's new pilot. Tony Craig

Preservation profile

Volume 12, Issue 03, 1984, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Mosquito T.JII RR299, built in 1945, is one of the last three airworthy examples of this classic aircraft out of a total of 7,781 built

Seeing double!

Volume 21 Issue 01, 1988, Aircraft illustrated

Darryl Cott

A delightful photo-feature Darryl Cott/BAe Hatfield on a unique Mosquito formation

De H's Beautiful Bomber

Volume 24, Issue 1, 1983, Air International

Developed in the face of much official apathy if not outright resistance, the deadly mosquito was among the most elegant of World War II's combat aircraft. The bomber variants are described in this "Warbirds" feature

Glyn's Gift

Volume 15, Issue 1, January 2008, Classic Wings Magazine

Not a single Mosquito remains flyable anywhere in the world today, this largely due to the wooden construction of the airframe. Whilst this was a major factor in the success of the

Mosquito Magic - A bomber is born!

Volume 11, Issue 1, January 2004, Classic Wings Magazine

Many have said it couldn't be done. Many others have said that it could be done, but it wouldn't be done because no one person would have the determination to stick out such a huge undertaking. And here we see a brand new, late production de Havilland Mosquito fuselage.

It has indeed been done

The Wooden Wonder

Volume 3, Issue 2, April 1996, Classic Wings Magazine

Graham Orphan discusses the unique wooden design of this classic wartime bomber and its inevitable decline, which until now was considered irrevocable.

Aucklander Glyn Powell is giving new hope for life to remaining Mosquitos worldwide. He has succeeded in producing the massive and complex fuselage moulds which have hitherto daunted restorers and procluded the building of replacement Mosquito fuselages.

If Glyn's test fuselage passes with flying colours, projects around the world will suddenly become viable restorations.

Aircraft Profile 209 - de Havilland Mosquito Mk. IV

Profile Publications Michael JF Bowyer

"A BOMBER with fighter speed"—this has long been the aim of aircraft designers. Geoffrey de Havilland• achieved some success in this direction in World War I with the D.H.4.* Hawkers memorable Hart* bomber emerged faster than the fighters of its day. The Bristol Blenheim,* it was hoped, would outpace defenders—which it did, until the advent of monoplane fighters. But the Mosquito, most versatile military aeroplane of all time, was the only one to live up to the dictum—"a bomber with fighter speed."
*See Profile Numbers 26, 57 and 93 respectively

Aircraft Profile 52 - de Havilland Mosquito Mks. I-IV

Profile Publications Philip JR Moyes

"Dubbed "The Wooden Wonder" and "The Termite's Dream" because of its wooden construction, the de Havilland Mosquito of W.W.II fame, was an aircraft of phenomenal speed, versatility and striking power. Born during the dark days of 1939-40, it was originally designed as a high-speed, unarmed bomber and upon entering operational service met with immediate success. Tested on high-altitude recon­naissance, it eluded the enemy's most vigilant defences. With bombs, it flew deep into Germany and the occupied countries and outpaced the Luftwafe's fastest interceptors. It doubled its bomb load, then doubled it again. It hit the enemy by day and by night. It laid mines and closed vital waterways to enemy shipping. A fighter version with four cannon and four machine-guns was built; then a fighter-bomber. With a six-pounder field gun the Mosquito was used against submarines. Another version added rockets to its armament, while yet another variant-unarmed like the bomber and P.R. marks-served as...

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