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B-29 Superfortress references, articles and publications

Image of Boeing B-50 (Air Force Legends)

Boeing B-50

Air Force Legends Geoffrey Hays

Despite being overshadowed by the B-36 and B-47, the Boeing B-50 was the primary atomic bomber of SAC for nearly seven years. This latest volume in Steve Ginter s popular Air Force Legends series explores every model of the second Superfortress, including some previously little-known variants. Bombers, reconnaissance platforms, tankers, test birds and trainers are examined in extraordinary detail, supported by photos, drawings and technical illustrations, hundreds of which appear publically for the first time. A concise text, supported by insightful captions, covers operational and hardware details from its atomic role to unit assignments and deployments. Written by former USAF Museum senior staffer, Geoff Hays, this 240 page volume features seven data tables and over 700 photos and illustrations.

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Image of Black Tuesday Over Namsi: B-29s vs MiGs - the Forgotten Air Battle of the Korean War, 23 October 1951

Black Tuesday Over Namsi: B-29s vs MiGs - the Forgotten Air Battle of the Korean War, 23 October 1951

Lt Col USAF (Ret.), Earl McGill

An hour and a half before sunup, nine B-29s of the 307th Bombardment Wing lifted off from Kadena Air Force Base, Okinawa on a bombing mission against Namsi, a North Korean airfield under construction in the heart of MiG Alley. Five and a half hours later they would engage in an air battle that would forever change the conduct of strategic aerial bombardment. Six of the nine would not return, the highest percentage of United States bombers ever lost on a major mission.Astonishingly, virtually nothing has been published about this event. Official Air Force historical records mention it only in passing and literature of the period too often emphasizes the gung-ho aspect than the grim reality of war. Black Tuesday Over Namsi chronicles the calamitous B-29 daylight-bombing mission flown by the 307th Bombardment Wing on 23 October 1951 against Namsi Airfield. What many experts consider the epic air battle of the Korean War and perhaps the greatest jet engagement in the history of aerial warfare has largely become another forgotten battle in a forgotten war. Here, Lt. Col McGill presents the facts and circumstances of the mission from first briefing to final landing.This book also records, from verifiable historical documents, the broader events and conditions that led up to the confrontation, plus the firsthand accounts of aircrew members and ground personnel who were there. Allied and Soviet perspectives are examined; statements made by the MiG pilots describe the attack; and eyewitnesses to the event have supplied photographs of the mission and its aftermath, including the aerial photo of the Namsi Airfield that was used to plan the mission. This thoroughly researched narrative history is enhanced by numerous photographs, a bibliography, and an index to full names, places and subjects. This is the story of the Americans and Russians who clashed in the skies above Namsi, the events leading up to it, Black Tuesday's historical impact on aerial warfare, and, for the first time, fresh conclusions based on a careful analysis of the specific factors that went into the execution of this and other bombing missions.

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Image of Superfortress, the Boeing B-29 - Aircraft Specials series (6028)

Superfortress, the Boeing B-29 - Aircraft Specials series (6028)

Steve Birdsall

Softcover, Squadron/Signal Publications-Texas 1980, From the library of John Molinari, R. O. (A.I.) 8th, R.A.F. & 9th Air Force, (NOTE: I have over 50 books from his personal library-most have his service dates inscribed) , in Very Good Condition, just a touch of shelf wear to covers and edges...Previous owner name and service dates on title page... no notes or writing-All pages are bright, clean and crisp... ISBN-0897471040...Thanks for supporting a small family business ...LOC SSM-7

The design, production and testing of the B-29 Superfortress was one of the most notable achievements of American Industry. Less than five years after the Boeing Company submitted its design for the world's first truly strategic bomber, the B-29s were laying waste to Japan.
The B-29 was an airplane of superlatives...the world's first pressurized bomber, the world's heaviest production airplane, with the most powerful engines and highest wing loading.
The proof of the design's inherent excellence was the fact that all 3,960 Superfortresses differed little from each other, or from the basic design. In fact, when the first flight of the XB-29 took place on September 21, 1942, six

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RAF Air-to-Air Refuelling

Volume 15, Issue 01, January 2002, Air Forces Monthly Magazine (AFM)

Jon Lake

Jon Lake reviews the development and operation of ait-to-air refuelling in the Royal Air Force, from its early days to the retirement of the Victor.

The RAF's tanker force is the proud inheritor of an air-to-air (AAR) capability largely designed and developed in Britain, and over the rears has refined the technique into a military art which has become vital. But before exploring the state of RAF AAR today, it is necessary to explain how the role developed from its foundation in the 1920s. Air to air refueling was pioneered by Britain before World War Two....

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Glory Days

Number 224, March 2000, Flypast magazine

March 22, 1950 the first Boeing Washingtons arrived at Marham, Norfolk, for the RAF. Acting as stop gaps between the Avro Lancaster and the EE Canberra, they posed many challenges to the crews of Bomber Command...

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Superfortresses For Japan

Number 224, March 2000, Flypast magazine

The role of Herington Army Air Field. Kansas, which played host to 60% of all B-29s that went overseas

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The Billion Dollar Bomber

Volume 1, Issue 3, 1971, Air International

Part Two of the story of how the Soviet Union put the Boeing B-29 into production as the Tupolev Tu-4, and then used it as the basis of a long line of improved bombers and transport designs

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The Billion Dollar Bomber

Volume 1, Issue 3, 1971, Air International

Part Two of the story of how the Soviet Union put the Boeing B-29 into production as the Tupolev Tu-4, and then used it as the basis of a long line of improved bombers and transport designs

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US Navy Aircraft on Display

Volume 18, Issue 12, 1956, Air Pictorial

ON 1st to 3rd September America's National Air Show was staged at Oklahoma City, and on display was the might ofthe U.S.A.F. / and U.S. Navy. Ranging from the  Cessna L-19B Bird Dog to the giant Convair B-36H, an impressive array of aircraft was on show.
The illustrations on these pages give some indication of the variety of aircraft in service with the U .S. Navy, and in comparison the Royal Navy, so far as aircraft are  concerned, lags behind.

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HIGH TIDE

Volume 49, Issue 5, 1995, Air International

Rene J Francillon

Rene J Francillon records the first use of in-flight refuelling to extend the range of large formations of tactical aircraft

"Few will deny thai large-scale operations against North Vietnam in 1965-1973, and against Iraq in 1991, depended heavily on tankers. Fewer remember that the feasibility of relying on tankers to extend the range of large formations of tactical aircraft was first demonstrated in 1952 by the 116th fighter-Romber Wing, an Air National Guard unit which had been activated for operations in Korea . This little known 'first' is recorded by Rene J Franclllon..."

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HISTORY OF IN-FLIGHT REFUELLING

Volume 49, Issue 5, 1995, Air International

Dave Allport

Dave Allport charts the development of what is arguably the greatest force multiplier to an air arm.

Dave Allport examines the evolution of in-flight refuelling from its earliest day, when it was an extremely cumbersume and laborious process, through to the present, where it is considered an essential part of many military operations worldwide.

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Rival To The B-29

Volume 48, December 1992, Air Enthusiast

Alan F Crouchman

Most people will dismiss the Consolidated B-32 Dominator as a non-operational failure. Not so, Alan Crouchman revels that it did see action and brought down the last enemy aircraft of World War Two .

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Making the "Right Stuff" Right

Volume 26, Issue 1, 1984, Air International

Thomas McKelvey Cleaver

Releasted for general viewing in the USA during Octiber, the motion picture "The Right Stuff" is a dramatic presentation of the story of America's first astronauts and the test-pilots of rocket powered aircraft who preceded them to the edge of space. Interesting in its own right, the film has attracted more that its share of attention for the spotlight it throws on John Glenn just as he launches his campaign for nomination as Democratic candidate in the US Presidential elections next November. "The Right Stuff" is based on the book of the same title by Tom Wolfe, which has already sold more than a million copies in the Bantam paperback edition, and its filming called for much special effort to recreate the flying sequences, as described here by Thomas McKelvey Cleaver

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Out of the Hurricane

Number 207, October 1998, Flypast magazine

When Hurrican 'Andrew' hit southern Florida in 1992 it caused massive destruction - and all but eliminated the Weeks Air Museum at Tamiami Airport. As FlyPast discovered, there is life after the Hurricane - including the restoration of a unique TP-40N

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Image of B-29 Superfortress - Color Walk Around No. 54

B-29 Superfortress - Color Walk Around No. 54

Walk around series Dennis Savage

Equipped with pressurized cabins for high-altitude effectiveness, with an electronic fire-control system, and remote-controlled machine gun turrets, the B-29 Superfortress was the most advanced aircraft of WWII. Two of those planes, the Superfortresses Enola Gay and Bockscar, dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. Yet over all, the B-29 received less notoriety than its storied elder siblings, the B-17 and B-24, perhaps because its service areas - the China, Burma, and India Theater and the Western Pacific - were less publicized than was the war in Europe. Designed by Boeing, nearly 4,000 B-29s had been turned out by the time production ended in 1946. Yet today, only a few meticulously restored and preserved examples of the historic aircraft survive. A unique look at the plane that ushered in the nuclear age. Illustrated with over 210 photographs; 80 pages.

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Image of BLACK TUESDAY OVER NAMSI: B-29s vs MiGs - the Forgotten Air Battle of the Korean War, 23 October 1951

BLACK TUESDAY OVER NAMSI: B-29s vs MiGs - the Forgotten Air Battle of the Korean War, 23 October 1951

Earl McGill , Earl McGill Lt Col USAF

An hour and a half before sunup, nine B-29s of the 307th Bombardment Wing lifted off from Kadena Air Force Base, Okinawa on a bombing mission against Namsi, a North Korean airfield under construction in the heart of MiG Alley. Five and a half hours later they would engage in an air battle that would forever change the conduct of strategic aerial bombardment. Six of the nine would not return, the highest percentage of United States bombers ever lost on a major mission.

Astonishingly, virtually nothing has been published about this event. Official Air Force historical records mention it only in passing and literature of the period too often emphasizes the gung-ho aspect than the grim reality of war.

Black Tuesday Over Namsi chronicles the calamitous B-29 daylight-bombing mission flown by the 307th Bombardment Wing on 23 October 1951 against Namsi Airfield. What many experts consider the epic air battle of the Korean War and perhaps the greatest jet engagement in the history of aerial warfare has largely become another forgotten battle in a forgotten war. Here, Lt. Col McGill presents the facts and circumstances of the mission from first briefing to final landing.

This book also records, from verifiable historical documents, the broader events and conditions that led up to the confrontation, plus the firsthand accounts of aircrew members and ground personnel who were there. Allied and Soviet perspectives are examined; statements made by the MiG pilots describe the attack; and eyewitnesses to the event have supplied photographs of the mission and its aftermath, including the aerial photo of the Namsi Airfield that was used to plan the mission. This thoroughly researched narrative history is enhanced by numerous photographs, a bibliography, and an index to full names, places and subjects.

This is the story of the Americans and Russians who clashed in the skies above Namsi, the events leading up to it, Black Tuesday's historical impact on aerial warfare, and, for the first time, fresh conclusions based on a careful analysis of the specific factors that went into the execution of this and other bombing missions.

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The Billion Dollar Bomber - Part 1

Volume 1, Issue 2, 1971, Air International

Part One of how the Soviet Union acquired a stragic bomber capability almost overnight, with the help of three B-29s which diverted to the Soviet Union after attacking Japanese targets.

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The Billion Dollar Bomber - Part III

Volume 1, Issue 4, 1971, Air International

Part Three: Boeing B-29 Superfortress used as a basis for the Soviet Union's original Tu-4 and Tu-80 and TU-85

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`What the Hell Are We Doing Here?

Number 312, July 2007, Flypast magazine

Jerry Scutts

Used to being an 'elite' force, the B-29 aircrew of the 58th Bomb Wing had to ferry their own bombs over the Himalayas! Jerry Scutts describes the 'Superfort' pioneers.

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Capital Bomber

Number 335, June 2009, Flypast magazine

Chris Howlett

Boeing Washingtons may have only served the RAF in the bomber role for four years but, as Chris Howlett explains, they were a major influence.

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Ultimate ‘Superfort’

Number 335, June 2009, Flypast magazine

Daniel Ford

Incredible, in the late 1960s China was developing new versions of the B-29 –Daniel Ford relates.

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Two-War Veteran

Number 335, June 2009, Flypast magazine

Pete West

Pete West’s artwork zooms in on a Korean conflict B-29 called ‘Flying Parts’.

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Slaughterhouse Dive

Number 335, June 2009, Flypast magazine

Ed Davies

Boeing’s ambitious B-29 was beset with development problems. Ed Davies explains how the fatal crash of a prototype very nearly brought the ‘Super Bomber’ programme to a close.

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Aircrew

Volume 36, Issue 08, 2008, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

James Kightly

James Kightly takes a detailed look at the vital role of the B-29 Superfortress Flight Engineer; illustration by Ian Bott

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Image of Boeing B-17 & B-29 Fortress & Super Fortress (Brooklands Aircraft Portfolio)

Boeing B-17 & B-29 Fortress & Super Fortress (Brooklands Aircraft Portfolio)

RM Clarke

One of a series comprising technical descriptions - cutaway drawings - genealogy - combat and operational reports from contemporary articles from Flight, The Aeroplane and Aircraft Production, with modern material from Aeroplane Monthly.

2/01/1987

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Image of Boeing B-17 & B-29 Fortress & Super Fortress (Brooklands Aircraft Portfolio)

Boeing B-17 & B-29 Fortress & Super Fortress (Brooklands Aircraft Portfolio)

RM Clarke

One of a series comprising technical descriptions - cutaway drawings - genealogy - combat and operational reports from contemporary articles from Flight, The Aeroplane and Aircraft Production, with modern material from Aeroplane Monthly.

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Image of B-29 Bomber Pilot's Flight Operating Manual

B-29 Bomber Pilot's Flight Operating Manual

Periscope Filmcom

The Boeing B-29 was one of the most sophisticated aircraft of WWII. It featured many innovations including guns that could be fired by remote control and pressurized crew compartments. It was also the heaviest production plane of the war with terrific range and bomb carrying capabilities. Carrying a crew of ten, the Superfortress devastated Japan in a series of gigantic raids in 1944-45. In the end it would be the B-29s "Enola Gay" and "Bock's Car" that dropped the atomic bombs and effectively ended the conflict. Originally printed by the United States Army Air Force in January of 1944, the B-29 Bomber Pilot's Flight Operating Manual taught pilots everything they needed to know about the "Superfort" Originally classified "Restricted", the manual was declassified long ago and is here reprinted in book form. This affordable facsimile has been reformatted, and color images appear as black and white. Care has been taken however to preserve the integrity of the text.

7/04/2006

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No. 31 - B-29 Superfortress in Action

Aircraft in Action Steve Birdsall

"People of Japan. Evacuate the following cities. The B-29s are coming soon. Your Warlords are powerless to stop them. The next cities on the list are: Yawata, Osaka, Tsu, Fukui...." And so the warnings would go, a chilling psychological blow, blatantly listing the targets for the huge, gleaming armada which was methodically destroying the remnants of an empire. The story of the B-29 began with an "official requirement", to be translated by the aircraft companies into a design. In February 1940 the companies were asked to design a heavily armed, high altitude bomber capable of carrying a maximum bomb load of eight tons, a ton of them for over five thousand miles, at a speed of four hundred miles per hour. Four companies submitted designs - the Lockheed and Douglas submissions never proceeded, Consolidated's saw brief life as the B-32 - Boeing's Model 345 would become the Superfortress. Two prototypes were ordered on August 24, 1940, and designated XB-29, and a third was ordered in...

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No. 165 - B-29 Superfortress in Action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

As early as 1934 the U.S. Army had envisioned an aircraft that was capable of carrying a 2,000 pound payload, with a range in excess of 5300 miles, which was far beyond current technology! However, by 1940 the Army issued design requirements that had evolved into specifications that called for a 'super bomber' — capable of a 400+ mph top speed, a 2,000 pound payload, and a range in excess of 5300 miles! All this in 1940, when the small, nimble fighters could not top 400 mph; and long range bombers barely had ranges of 2500 miles. What manufacturer could possibly hope to meet these requirements? Four tried, two succeeded. Boeing, Consolidated, Douglas, and Lockheed all put forth design proposals based on these requirements. Lockheed's XB-30 (Model 51-81-01) was based on an armed version of what would eventually become the very successful Constellation airliner. However, as a 'super bomber' the Lockheed design never went beyond the proposal stage, although a scale model was built....

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Washington stop-gap

Volume 62, Issue 03, 2000, Air Pictorial

A photo-feature remembering the RAF's brief experience with the B-29, 50 years ago.

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Image of Boeing B-29 Superfortress - Warbird Tech Vol. 14

Boeing B-29 Superfortress - Warbird Tech Vol. 14 (Vol 14)

Peter M Bowers

With more than 30 volumes now available, this series is one of the best sources of information for modellers and aviation enthusiasts. Each volume is jam packed full of excerpts, drawings, exploded views, cutaways, assembly line, and repair depot photographs taken from original tech manuals.

10/06/1999

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Image of Boeing B-29 Superfortress : American Bomber Aircraft in World War II Vol. II

Boeing B-29 Superfortress : American Bomber Aircraft in World War II Vol. II

John M Campbell

The famed B-29 Superfortress is presented in this all new collection of World War II and Korean War era photographs. Many of the 850+ photographs appear here for the first time and are identified as to unit and location. John Campbell is also the author of Consolidated B-24 Liberator, and Talisman: A Collection of Nose Art (available from Schiffer Publishing Ltd.).

1/07/1997

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Image of I Always Wanted to Fly: America's Cold War Airmen

I Always Wanted to Fly: America’s Cold War Airmen

Wolfgang W E Samuel

Until now, no book has covered all of Cold War air combat in the words of the men who waged it. In I Always Wanted to Fly, retired United States Air Force Colonel Wolfgang W. E. Samuel has gathered first-person memories from heroes of the cockpits and airstrips.

Battling in dogfights when jets were novelties, saving lives in grueling airlifts, or flying dangerous reconnaissance missions deep into Soviet and Chinese airspace, these flyers waged America's longest and most secretively conducted air war.

Many of the pilots Samuel interviewed invoke the same sentiment when asked why they risked their lives in the air--"I always wanted to fly." While young, they were inspired by barnstormers, by World War I fighter legends, by the legendary Charles Lindbergh, and often just by seeing airplanes flying overhead. With the advent of World War II, many of these dreamers found themselves in cockpits soon after high school. Of those who survived World War II, many chose to continue following their dream, flying the Berlin Airlift, stopping the North Korean army during the "forgotten war" in Korea, and fighting in the Vietnam War.

Told in personal narratives and reminiscences, I Always Wanted to Fly renders views from pilots' seats and flight decks during every air combat flashpoint from 1945--1968. Drawn from long exposure to the immense stress of warfare, the stories these warriors share are both heroic and historic.

The author, a veteran of many secret reconnaissance missions, evokes individuals and scenes with authority and grace. He provides clear, concise historical context for each airman's memories. In I Always Wanted to Fly he has produced both a thrilling and inspirational acknowledgment of personal heroism and a valuable addition to our documentation of the Cold War.

21/08/2001

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Image of B-29 Units of World War II

B-29 Units of World War II

Robert F Dorr

The ultimate piston-engined heavy bomber of World War II (1939-1945), the first production B-29s were delivered to the 58th Very Heavy Bomb Wing in the autumn of 1943. By the spring of 1944 the Superfortress was bombing targets in the Pacific, and by war’s end the aircraft had played as great a part as any weapon in ending the conflict with the Japanese. Indeed, the final dropping of two atomic bombs from the B-29 convinced the Japanese to sue for peace. This book traces the wartime career of the B-29, as the aircraft went from strength to strength in the Pacific Theatre.

25/07/2002

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Image of Boeing B-29 Superfortress: The Ultimate Look: From Drawing Board to VJ-Day (Schiffer Military History)

Boeing B-29 Superfortress: The Ultimate Look: From Drawing Board to VJ-Day (Schiffer Military History)

William Wolf

Although many books have been published about the B-29, none has been an in-depth look, with most being either superficial pictorials or focusing on the bombing campaigns, particularly the incendiary attacks and atomic bombings. This book, using rare, pre

1/01/2004

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Image of The Enola Gay: The B-29 That Dropped the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima

The Enola Gay: The B-29 That Dropped the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima

Norman Polmar

The world entered the atomic age in August 1945, when the B-29 Superfortress nicknamed Enola Gay flew some 1,500 miles from the island of Tinian and dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. The “Little Boy” bomb exploded with the force of 12.5 kilotons of TNT, nearly destroying the city. Three days later, another B-29 dropped an atomic bomb on Nagasaki. The Japanese government, which had been preparing a bloody defense against an invasion, surrendered six days later. The aircraft was the primary artifact in an exhibition at the National Air and Space Museum from 1995 to 1998. The original, controversial exhibit script was changed, and the final exhibition attracted some 4 million visitors, testifying to the enduring interest in the aircraft and its mission. This book tells the story of the Enola Gay, the Boeing B-29 program, and the combat operations of the B-29 type. After nearly two decades of restoration, the Enola Gay will be one of the highlights of the museum’s new Udvar-Hazy Center, which is scheduled to open at Dulles International Airport on December 15, 2003.

27/02/2004

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Image of Bringing the Thunder: The Missions of a World War II B-29 Pilot in the Pacific (Stackpole Military History Series)

Bringing the Thunder: The Missions of a World War II B-29 Pilot in the Pacific (Stackpole Military History)

Gordon Bennett , Jr Robertson

  • Features dozens of never-before-seen photos of the B-29 in action
  • A fast-paced, riveting account that puts the reader in the cockpit of a four-engine bomber over enemy territory
  • Detailed account of combat, mission by mission

    The B-29 bomber was made to soar in thin, cold air, dropping its massive bomb load from heights so great that the crews might never see their targets through the clouds below. That was just fine with Ben Robertson, pilot in command of one of the big four engine bombers hammering Japan to its knees in a nonstop bombing campaign in the Pacific. When General LeMay ordered the B-29s to switch tactics from daylight, high-altitude bombing runs to nighttime, low-level runs, Ben's attitude changed. What was once seen as simply dangerous--bombing Japan--now seemed a whole lot more like suicide.

    10/11/2006

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  • Image of Superfortress: The Boeing B-29 and American Airpower in World War II

    Superfortress: The Boeing B-29 and American Airpower in World War II

    Curtis LeMay

    "A fascinating history of a remarkable aircraft."—Edward Jablonski

    "An eloquent tribute." —Publishers Weekly

    "Superb. . . . an excellent history." —General John T. Chain, Jr. USAF

    Among the most sophisticated aircraft flown during World War II, the Boeing B-29 Superfortress was designed to replace the B-17 as the primary long-range bomber of the U.S. Army Air Forces. With its distinctive glazed nose and long, thin wings that provided both speed at high altitude and stability at takeoff and landing, the Superfortress was the first operational bomber with a pressurized crew cabin and featured advanced radar and avionics. Armed with remote-controlled machine gun turrets and a 20,000 pound bomb load, it was the first USAAF bomber capable of mastering the vast distances of the Pacific Theater of World War II. The prototype flew in September 1942 but a series of post-production modifications delayed the bomber's first mission until April 1944. Superfortresses began attacking Japan in daylight with conventional ordnance from high altitude, but their mission was redirected in March 1945, with massive low-level formations dropping incendiary bombs! at night on Japanese cities. The ensuing firestorms, followed by the complete destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by atomic bombs dropped from two specially modified "silverplate" B-29s, forced Japan to cease fighting.

    Written by the man who led the B-29 into combat, Superfortress: The Boeing B-29 and American Airpower in World War II is an important document of one of the most turbulent times in world history. General Curtis LeMay recalls the early debate about whether or not the United States needed a long-range bomber, how the B-29 was created and produced despite the enormous logistical difficulties of the design, and the decision to conduct fire-bombings against Japan and ultimately drop the atomic bomb. Highly praised when it was first published, this new edition is complete with photographs, a new introduction, and statistical tables.

    27/11/2006

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    Image of The B-29 Superfortress Chronology, 1934-1960

    The B-29 Superfortress Chronology, 1934-1960

    Robert A Mann

    The Boeing B-29 Superfortress lived an operational life of only 26 years, but what a life it was. Two of the most famous B-29s, the Enola Gay and Bockscar, were responsible for dropping the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Beginning with an introduction that provides basic information on the physical plane itself, including dimensions, specs, leading particulars and operational usages, this book provides a chronology of the B-29 from the first feasibility studies and earliest designs in 1934 to the retirement of the last operational B-29 by the Air Force in 1960. The book also includes a glossary and three appendices which provide a discussion of the general anatomy of a mission, a sample of operational voice or radio codes used in 1945, and an exhaustive (and entertaining) reference guide to aircraft names like the Ape Ship, Bait Me?, and Flying Lemon.

    13/05/2009

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    Image of Boeing: The Complete Story

    Boeing: The Complete Story

    Alain J Pelletier

    Founded in 1916, Boeing Commercial Airplanes is the premier aircraft builder in the USA and one of the biggest aerospace constructors in the world. To the man in the street Boeing is inextricably linked with some of the greatest names in aircraft design and construction: the B-17 Flying Fortress bomber, the 707 (the USA’s first commercial jet airliner), the revolutionary 747 ‘jumbo jet’ and the massive B-52 bomber. This comprehensive and handsomely illustrated history of the ‘plane builder from Seattle’ includes details of every aircraft it has ever built, together with data charts and informative text boxes.

    1/11/2010

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    Image of The Silverplate Bombers: A History and Registry of the Enola Gay and Other B-29s Configured to Carry

    The Silverplate Bombers: A History and Registry of the Enola Gay and Other B-29s Configured to Carry

    R H Campbell

    In the year that World War II began, Albert Einstein sent his famous letter to President Roosevelt regarding the feasibility of a revolutionary uranium bomb. What was considered infeasible at the time was the development of aircraft capable of carrying an atomic device.

    This book documents the development and delivery of the Silverplate B-29 bomber, the remarkable airplane with capabilities that surpassed those of known enemy fighters of the time and was employed to release the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima in 1945. The basic history of the Silverplate B-29, from conception to successful development, is set forth in the early chapters, which discuss the then secret work of the 509th Composite Group at Wendover Army Air Field, on the Marianas Island of Tinian, and at Roswell Army Air Field. Subsequent chapters discuss the Los Alamos test program, Silverplate B-29 combat operations, the Air Force bases from which the aircraft operated, accidents associated with operations and details of the various classes of atomic bombs carried. Concluding chapters give special attention to the members of the 509th, who were responsible for dropping the bombs and whose efforts brought an end to World War II, provided the backbone of America’s nuclear deterrent force in the years after the war, and opened the Atomic Age. Information available in the seven appendices includes, among other things, a chronology of events surrounding the development of the Silverplate bomber and the atomic bomb, a Silverplate B-29 mission list, and individual Silverplate B-29 histories.

    The story of this special bomber is accompanied by many never before published photographs of Silverplate B-29’s and the men who flew them and includes a foreword by Paul W. Tibbets, the pilot of the Enola Gay on the Hiroshima mission.

    1/08/2005

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    Raz'n Hell

    Number 51, October 1985, Flypast magazine

    The background on Castle AFB's B-29, the subject of some FlyPost contributions of late.

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    Hawg Wild

    Number 47, June 1985, Flypast magazine

    Ken Kroeger

    Duxford's B-29 has been with us five years. Ken Kroeger and friends recall the momentous ferry flight.

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    Disposal: B-29 Superfortress

    Number 42, January 1985, Flypast magazine

    Philip D Chinnery

    Phil Chinnery documents the massacre of the world's first atom bomber, the Boeing B-29 Superfortress, whose numbers have diminished from almost 4,000 to a maximum of 36.

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    Superfortress Comeback

    Number 228, July 2000, Flypast magazine

    Ron Werneth

    Ron Werneth Starts A Major Survey Of The World Boeing B-29 Population.

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    Rattlesnake Base

    Number 237, April 2001, Flypast magazine

    Lou Thole

    Concluding His Investigation Into The History Of Pyote Army Air Field In Texas, Lou Thole Looks At B-29 Training And The Storage Of Redundant Air- Frames.

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    Image of Tupolev Tu-4 Superfortress -Red Star Volume 7

    Tupolev Tu-4 Superfortress - Red Star Vol. 7

    Yefim Gordon

    The Tu-4 is identified as an example of the Soviets copying Western airplane designs. Three Boeing B-29s fell into Soviet hands at the end of World War II. This book shows the evolution of the "Superfortresski" into the Tu-70 military transport and its airliner version, the Tu-75 and Tu-85 - the last of Tupolev's piston-engined bombers. Also described are the various experimental versions, including the Burlaki towed fighter program, flight refueling tanker and missile carrier versions, and Chinese turboprop-powered AWACS and drone launcher conversions. Operational details include use for transport and paradropping, civil polar research, etc. The book includes many previously unpublished photographs as well as drawings of the rival 102 and 103 bombers designed by Myasischchev.

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    Image of B-29 Superfortress Units of the Korean War (Combat Aircraft)

    B-29 Superfortress Units of the Korean War (Combat Aircraft)

    Robert F Dorr

    This book is the story of a majestic bomber of the propeller era flying perilous combat missions against a sleek, nimble warplane of the jet age, the Soviet MiG-15. A very heavy bomber and a sky giant during World War II, at that time the B-29 was the most advanced combat aircraft in the world. By the time North Korea attacked its southern neighbour in 1950, thus starting the Korean War (1950-1953) the B-29 had been reclassified a medium bomber. Many of its crew members had fought their war and settled down to raise families and begin careers only to be recalled to fight another war on a distant Asian peninsula.

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    Image of B-29 Hunters of the JAAF  (Osprey Aviation Elite 5)

    B-29 Hunters of the JAAF (Osprey Aviation Elite 5)

    Koji Takaki

    'B-29!' No other term struck such terror in the hearts of the Japanese public during World War 2 than this single, most-hated name. It was then only natural that the pilots who attempted to shoot these high-flying Boeing bombers out of the skies over Tokyo, Nagasaki, Hiroshima and Kobe should become known as the elite of the Japanese Army Air Force. This book details the exploits of the ‘Dragon Slayers’ who, flying the very latest single- and twin-engined fighters, exacted a heavy toll on the AAF Boeing bombers using a range of tactics including ramming.

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    Image of Flying the Hump: In Original World War II Color

    Flying the Hump: In Original World War II Color

    Jeffrey L Ethell

    The capture of the Burma Road by the Japanese during World War II forced U.S. airmen to fly hundreds of missions a day into China in an airlift of epic proportions. Having to fly over the towering Himalayan Mountains, the pilots came to know this route as 'flying the hump.' The Hump was a pioneering aviation operation that had just about everything working against it: the forbidding mountains, the worst flying weather in the world, deadly Japanese fighters, the crudest of navigational aids, unproven aircraft, and inexperienced flight and maintenance crews. Military commanders considered a flight over the Hump to be more hazardous than a bombing mission over Europe. More than 1,300 pilots and crew members were lost and more than 500 transport planes crashed trying to make it. Flying the Hump contains more than (170) original color photographs depicting the lives of the pilots and their planes during this dangerous operation. Many Hump pilots shared their personal recollections of rare photos and many untold stories to comprise this book of seat-of-the-pants flying.

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    Image of Enola Gay and the Smithsonian Institution

    Enola Gay and the Smithsonian Institution

    Charles T O'Reilly

    On August 6, 1945, the B-29 Enola Gay dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, which ushered on the end of World War II. For the 50th anniversary of this major event in world history, the National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution produced an exhibit. A controversy erupted, however, over the exhibit's historical authenticity. Veterans, for example, complained that the museum displayed a misrepresented version of history. After concisely covering the background of the Enola Gay and its mission, this study focuses on the controversy surrounding the museum exhibit. Issues covered include casualty figures, ethical questions, and political correctness, among others. The viewpoints of such groups as museum personnel, exhibit organizers, veterans, and historians are covered. Appendices offer information on content analysis of the National Air and Space Museum exhibit script, non-museum materials that were intended to complement the exhibit script, and the importance of full disclosure in research.

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    Image of The Enola Gay: The B-29 That Dropped the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima

    The Enola Gay: The B-29 That Dropped the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima

    Norman Polmar

    The world entered the atomic age in August 1945, when the B-29 Superfortress nicknamed Enola Gay flew some 1,500 miles from the island of Tinian and dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. The “Little Boy” bomb exploded with the force of 12.5 kilotons of TNT, nearly destroying the city. Three days later, another B-29 dropped an atomic bomb on Nagasaki. The Japanese government, which had been preparing a bloody defense against an invasion, surrendered six days later. The aircraft was the primary artifact in an exhibition at the National Air and Space Museum from 1995 to 1998. The original, controversial exhibit script was changed, and the final exhibition attracted some 4 million visitors, testifying to the enduring interest in the aircraft and its mission. This book tells the story of the Enola Gay, the Boeing B-29 program, and the combat operations of the B-29 type. After nearly two decades of restoration, the Enola Gay will be one of the highlights of the museum’s new Udvar-Hazy Center, which is scheduled to open at Dulles International Airport on December 15, 2003.

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    Image of Strike and Return: American Air Power and the Fight for Iwo Jima

    Strike and Return: American Air Power and the Fight for Iwo Jima

    Cory Graff

    The Pacific island of Iwo Jima was the most expensive piece of real estate America has ever purchased. Lying halfway between U.S. air bases in the Mariana Islands and downtown Tokyo, the Japanese island was a threat to American aviation operations during the last phases of the war in the Pacific theater. So the United States took Iwo Jima, and in the process lost over 6,800 fighting men in some of the most brutal and bloody fighting of the war. Once the tables were turned, Iwo Jima offered valuable advantages to its conquerors. The island became a massive, unsinkable aircraft carrier," close enough to Japan to furnish fighter escorts for big bombers, a hub for air sea rescue efforts, and an emergency landing field for hundreds of crippled American bombers. This book examines all aspects of the aviation activities surrounding Iwo Jima during the last year of World War II with exciting and informative first-hand accounts and hundreds of color and black-and-white images many of which have never been published before.

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    Image of The Hump: America's Strategy for Keeping China in World War II (Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series)

    The Hump: America's Strategy for Keeping China in World War II (Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series)

    John D Plating PhD

    Chronicling the most ambitious airlift in history . . .

    Carried out over arguably the world’s most rugged terrain, in its most inhospitable weather system, and under the constant threat of enemy attack, the trans-Himalayan airlift of World War II delivered nearly 740,000 tons of cargo to China, making it possible for Chinese forces to wage war against Japan. This operation dwarfed the supply delivery by land over the Burma and Ledo Roads and represented the fullest expression of the U.S. government’s commitment to China.


    In this groundbreaking work—the first concentrated historical study of the world’s first sustained combat airlift operation—John D. Plating argues that the Hump airlift was initially undertaken to serve as a display of American support for its Chinese ally, which had been at war with Japan since 1937. However, by 1944, with the airlift’s capability gaining momentum, American strategists shifted the purpose of air operations to focus on supplying American forces in China in preparation for the U.S.’s final assault on Japan. From the standpoint of war materiel, the airlift was the precondition that made possible all other allied military action in the China-Burma-India theater, where Allied troops were most commonly inserted, supplied, and extracted by air.


    Drawing on extensive research that includes Chinese and Japanese archives, Plating tells a spellbinding story in a context that relates it to the larger movements of the war and reveals its significance in terms of the development of military air power. The Hump demonstrates the operation’s far-reaching legacy as it became the example and prototype of the Berlin Airlift, the first air battle of the Cold War. The Hump operation also bore significantly on the initial moves of the Chinese Civil War, when Air Transport Command aircraft moved entire armies of Nationalist troops hundreds of miles in mere days in order to prevent Communist forces from being the ones to accept the Japanese surrender.

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    Fifi Flies Again

    Volume 25, Issue 08, 1997, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    New air-to-air photographs by Michael O'Leary of Confederate Air Force Boeing B-29 Superfortress Fifi, back in the air again following engine problems at the start of this year's display season

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    Superfort on ice

    Volume 15, Issue 04, 1987, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

    Giles Kershaw

    Exclusive pictures of a B-29 abandoned in a remote area of Greenland in 1947, and photographed in 1985 by Britannia Airways 737 captain and polar pilot Giles Kershaw

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    Aircraft Profile 101 - The Boeing B-29 Superfortress

    Profile Publications MAYBORN

    "The Boeing B-29 Superfortress was designed and built for a single primary purpose in World War II—to bomb the Japanese Empire.  The result was an airplane to which many superlatives were applied, not the least example of which was the fact that on 6th August 1945, the B-29 Enola Gay dropped the first atomic weapon ever used in combat. Three days later on 9th August the B-29 Bockscar dropped the second atomic bomb, thus quickly bringing about the end of World War H. It is important to note in a single short paragraph that these two bombs, named "Little Boy" and "Fat Boy" were the only atomic weapons ever used in combat. And it was two B-29's that dropped the bombs..."

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