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3-view drawing references, articles and publications

Image of British Experimental Combat Aircraft of World War II: Prototypes, Research Aircraft, and Failed Production Designs

British Experimental Combat Aircraft of World War II. Prototypes, Research Aircraft and Failed Production Designs

Tony Buttler

This new book by Tony Buttler, a first of its kind, describes the British fighter, bomber, and research aircraft produced in the run up to and during World War II.

Detailed coverage of aircraft that were built and flown as prototypes only, combine with others such as the Westland Welkin which entered production but never reached a squadron. Un-built design projects are explained and all types are covered separately, along with a large selection of photographs, some of which have rarely been seen before.

This book covers basic short-term insurance fighters such as the Miles M.20, the Martin-Baker M.B.5, and Supermarine Spitfire, which represented the ultimate in piston fighter development, the Fairey Spearfish torpedo bomber and the four engine Vickers Windsor, oddities like the Blackburn B.20 flying boat, and Britain's first jet aircraft, the Gloster E.28/39.

A comprehensive appendix, with the use of photographs and brief details, examines one-off examples of standard
production types that were fitted with non-standard features.

Gathered from archival sources, renowned author Tony Buttler presents a wealth of information on these historic aircraft.

Experimental and cancelled project aircraft of WWII have not received the same coverage as the many iconic aircraft from the same era. These were often aircraft that, had they reached service, could have become famous in their own right, but instead have been largely overlooked and forgotten. Some of these types were simply overtaken by advances in aircraft design before they could reach production while others, such as the Martin Baker MB5 and Westland Welkin, were very capable aircraft which had the misfortune to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. This book covers some 35 aircraft including Blackburn B.20, B.40, B.44 and B.48/Y.A.1, Bristol Buckingham, Folland Fo.108, 116 and 117; Hawker Hotspur, Martin Baker MB.2, MB.3 and MB.5, Short S.31, S.35, S.36 and S.38 plus many others.

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Image of Valiant Units of the Cold War (Combat Aircraft)

Valiant Units of the Cold War

Osprey Combat Aircraft Series Andrew Brookes

The RAF's first Cold War strategic bomber, the Vickers Valiant, was procured as an insurance measure in case either the Vulcan or Victor was found to have a serious flaw. The Valiant was the equivalent of the US B-47 Stratojet, and it blazed the trail for the British airborne nuclear deterrent as the aircraft enjoyed a far more active service career than later V-bombers. It was the launch platform for all British free fall nuclear weapons tests both in the Pacific and in central Australia, it took part in the Suez campaign in 1956 and it was the only V-bomber to drop (conventional) weapons in anger until the Falklands operation in 1982. The Valiant was modified to serve in the electronic warfare, strategic reconnaissance and airborne tanker role. It was the first V-bomber to operate down at low level when it was assigned to the Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR), and the last six squadrons were scheduled to remain in service until 1970. However, the Valiant force had to be grounded in early 1965 when the aircraft succumbed to metal fatigue.

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Super Mirages': France's Quest for a Future Fighter

Volume 101, September 2002, Air Enthusiast

Tony Buttler

France withdrew from the Anglo-French Variable Geometry project for 'financial reasons' on June 29, 1967. Work on this programme - the AFVG - had been ongoing for two years. Britain continued with a UK VG aircraft and then moved on to the multi-national Multi-Role Combat Aircraft which eventually became hardware as the Panavia Tornado from Germany, Italy and the UK. France was then free to continue its own 'in-house' projects which were to crystallise into a very impressive-looking combat aircraft that, unfortunately, was just too expensive to put into service.

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Unknown' North Americans: North American Fighter and Trainer Projects

Volume 101, September 2002, Air Enthusiast

Jared Zichek

As one of the most popular subjects in the literature of aviation history, it seems every aspect of the developmental history of the North American P-51 Mustang has already been covered, often many times over. Fortunately, the wellspring of primary source material on this thoroughbred aircraft isn't entirely dry, and occasionally some interesting scraps of information surface regarding unusual projected derivatives that never left the drawing board.

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Five to Nine: Evolving the Spitfire - A Detailed Examination of the Modifications

Volume 95, September 2001, Air Enthusiast

Wojtek Matusiak

Supermarine's Type 361 - the Spitfire IX - was intended as a hasty stop-gap measure, pending delivery of the much-improved Type 360 (the Mk.VIII). The Mk.IX was essentially a Mk.Vc fitted with a more powerful Merlin 60-series engine - it required only the minimum number of changes to the internal systems to accept the engine. As it turned out, the Type 361 (later also manufactured as the Mk.XVI - virtually the same but fitted with a licence-built engine) was eventually built in larger numbers than any other Spitfire version.

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Queen of the Skies: Homage to the Vickers VC-10

Volume 92, March 2001, Air Enthusiast

Frank Prince

One of the most stylish airliners to have ever been built, anywhere, is the Vickers VC-10. Unfortunately, like so many products from Britain, it was betrayed to the mighty dollar and lost from the skies as a civilian aircraft. To its credit, the RAF still operates a diminishing fleet of original VC-10s and several former civilian examples. They will continue in service until 2009 at least - nearly 50 years after the prototype first flew. To understand the VC-10 story, one must go back to 1951 when the first of Britain's V-bombers flew - the Vickers Valiant, this was a success and the idea for a transport variant was requested by the Ministry of Supply, as a replacement for the Handley Page Hastings. One example (XD662) of the Vickers Type 1000 was ordered in October 2, 1952, on Contract 6/Air/8630/CB.6(c), to be fitted with the new Rolls-Royce RCo.3 Conway turbojets for trial purposes. Specification C.132d called for a flight refuelling capability as a receiver, with the proviso of...

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Graf Zeppelin' Afloat: Germany's Aircraft Carrier - A Potentially Formidable 'Might Have Been'

Volume 92, March 2001, Air Enthusiast

Henk Van Willigenburg

When Hitler rose to power in Germany he wasted no time in building up his armed forces. Plans were laid out to expand the German Navy, the Kriegsmarine, with battleships and a number of supporting vessels, including aircraft carriers. An entry in the 1936 Naval Estimates cleared the way for building Flugzeugtr

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Poseidon's Giant: The Story of the Martin P6M SeaMaster

Volume 92, March 2001, Air Enthusiast

Francis J Allen

"Come now into the domain of Poseidon, a new winged navy vehicle with unsurpassed dash, elusiveness and lethal power..." Those were the words that formed part of the introduction of the certificate which was given to the naval aviators who had qualified in the Martin P6M SeaMaster. It was the idea of using the realm of Poseidon more effectively that led the US Navy to develop a group of highly innovative aircraft during the late 1940s and 1950s. The most innovative of this group, without doubt, were the Convair XF2Y-1 Sea Dart and the Martin P6M SeaMaster. Turbojets powered both of these aircraft and both incorporated highly imaginative concepts in their hull/fuselage design. The similarity, however, ended with those concepts. The Sea Dart had a fuselage/wing combination that aided buoyancy, while the SeaMaster was a conventional flying-boat. It should also be noted that the Sea Dart was only an experimental seaplane, whereas the SeaMaster was an operational Navy flying-boat.

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Image of Grumman F6F Hellcat (Naval Fighters No. 92)

Grumman F6F Hellcat

Naval Fighters Steve Ginter

The Grumman F6F Hellcat was the most important Naval aircraft in WWII. Without it the Pacific war would have had a very protracted conclusion. The F6F was built to Roy Grumman's simple design philosophy "Grumman will only build an easily produced, maintained and reliable combat aircraft that can be readily mastered by a 200-hour, war-time pilot trained to fly from a carrier, engage in successful combat, sustain combat damage, return to the carrier, and land his aircraft after dark so that he can be available for combat again the next day." Because the F6F was all that, it earned Grumman the nick name "The Ironworks." Grumman built 12,275 Hellcats during WWII in its successful effort of clearing the skys of the Japanese. The XF6F was first flown on 8 August 1942 and the production version, the F6F-3 flew on 3 October 1942. The F6F-3 first entered squadron service with VF-9 on 16 January 1943 and drew its first blood over Marcus Island on 31 August 1943. The Hellcat shot down 5,156 enemy aircraft, for a kill-to-loss ratio of 19-to-1, while producing 307 aces. This was the aircraft of the largest one-day air battle of all time, the "Marianas Turkey Shoot" where more than 540 Hellcats fought 440 Japanese naval aircraft backed by up to 600 Japanese Army aircraft. Result was 354 enemy aircraft kills were claimed by the Hellcats while only 16 F6Fs were lost to Japanese aircraft. The Hellcat would see combat as photo birds (F6F-3P/5Ps) and night fighters (F6F-3E/3N/5E/5Ns) too as well as the improved F6F-5 fighter.

The book covers the F6Fs development, testing, and production written by Grumman's test pilot "Corky" Meyer. This is followed by technical details and a running combat narrative. The Marines, British, French, and European action is covered as well as training command during and after WWII and sections on post war, reserve, drones, and Hellcat prey.

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Image of McDonnell F2H-3/4 Big Banjo (Naval Fighters)

McDonnell F2H-3/4 Big Banjo

Naval Fighters Steve Ginter

The F2H-3/4 Banshee ("Big Banjo") was a direct outgrowth of the F2H-1 and F2H-2 series of Korean war fighter and recon jets (see Naval Fighters #73 Early Banshees). It became the US Navy's first single seat all-weather carrier interceptor. To satisfy its mission the F2H-3/4 was required to have a significant increase in range. To accomplish this the internal fuel capacity was more than doubled by stretching the fuselage by 8 feet 1.6 inches. This gave the F2H-3/4 a combat range with tip tanks of 1,490 nautical miles. In addition to the fuselage extension, the tail surfaces of the F2H-3/4 were also redesigned. The horizontal tail was moved down to the rear of the fuselage tail cone and given a 10 degree dihedral. To accommodate the enlarged radar unit the four nose-mounted cannons were moved aft along the lower fuselage sides. The difference in the F2H-3 and F2H-4 was in the radar. The F2H-3 used the Westinghouse APQ-41 with a 28" dish and the F2H-4 was equipped with the Hughes APG-37 radar. The F2H-4 further differs from the -3 by having up-rated J34-WE-38 engines. The larger engines allowed for a service ceiling of 56,000 ft. The aircraft also had increased wing stations and was capable of carrying Sidewinder air-to-air missiles. The aircraft were active with the Navy and Marines from 1952 through 1959. It was operated by 31 active Navy and Marine squadrons which histories appear in the book along with squadron insignia. The book also includes a chapter on Royal Canadian F2H-3s.

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Image of Republic F-105 Thunderchief (Air Vanguard)

Republic F-105 Thunderchief

Osprey New Vanguard Series Peter Davies

The Republic F-105 was the fastest and most successful Cold War strike fighter. Designed to deliver nuclear weapons at low altitude and then fight its way back to base it was the primary weapon in the USAF's world-wide tactical strike arsenal in the early 1960s. Thunderchief pilots in Europe, the Far East and the USA stood on short-notice alert, ready to take on formidable defences in their supersonic attacks on pre-planned Communist bloc targets. However, the F-105 achieved legendary status in a very different conflict.

When direct American involvement in Vietnam began in 1964 F-105s were deployed to the area, initially as a deterrent but increasingly as conventional attack fighters against insurgency in Laos and Vietnam. As the pace of war increased and bombing of North Vietnam began in 1965 the Thunderchief was the most important weapon in attacks against the most heavily defended territory in modern history. Two wings of F-105s, manned by pilots whose experience often included combat in WWII and Korea, performed truly heroic deeds in an environment where the political and tactical odds were usually stacked against them. Flying long distances from their bases in Thailand the fighters maintained daily attacks on military, transport and industrial targets, braving deadly Soviet anti-aircraft missiles and flak 'thick enough to walk on' (in the words of one pilot). Additionally, they shot down at least 27 North Vietnamese MiG fighters in eighteen months, more than half the total scored by the official F-4 Phantom II anti-MiG escorts in that period. However, the cost was unacceptably high: 330 out of a total production of 753 F-105Ds and two-seat F-105Fs were lost in combat, curtailing the type's front-line service. The two-seat F-105F, initially produced as a trainer, became a vital pioneer in the field of electronic warfare. Specially-equipped examples used new technology to detect and defeat Soviet radar guided missiles and anti-aircraft guns introducing revolutionary tactics in SEAD (suppression of enemy air defences) which are still in use today. They provided essential support to the Linebacker operations that ended the war in 1972 and continued in service after the surviving single-seat F-105s had been relegated to reserve duties.

Historically and technically the F-105 epitomises the 'faster and higher' design philosophy of 1950s aircraft technology. Its designer, Alexander Kartveli, was responsible for the WW II P-47 Thunderbolt and a series of F-84 fighter designs that gave the USAF its first credible jet striker for the Korean War and the basis of its tactical nuclear strike capability in the 1950s. The F-105 marked the climax of this design process, creating a fighter which could out-run any MiG at low altitude and project US air power at long range in ways that defeated the most sophisticated air defences.
Visually, the F-105 was an impressively large and dramatic-looking fighter. In combat service it acquired a wide range of colour schemes (including that of the Thunderbirds aerobatic team) and wartime artwork that lead to attractive illustrative material. Despite its undoubted importance, popularity and its legendary combat record the type has attracted comparatively slight attention from publishers and nothing (at least, since the 1960s Profile Publications) that presents its full story in the compact but thorough form that an Air Vanguard could offer to a wide range of enthusiasts and students.

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Blackburn Shark

Volume 6 Issue 10, 1973, Aircraft illustrated

DEVELOPED as a private-venture prototype, the Blackburn B-6 Shark prototype two/three seat torpedo-spotter-reconnaissance (TSR) aircraft first flew in August 1933, and following successful Service evaluation trials 16 production aircraft, designated Shark I, were ordered for the Fleet Air Arm. The Shark I officially entered service in May 1935 with 820 Squadron aboard HMS Courageous replacing the squadron's Fairey Seals. This mark was followed by 126 Mk Ils and 95 Mk Ills in turn, the latter featuring a glazed canopy over the cockpits. By 1938, however, the Shark was already, obsolete and was relegated to other duties such as target towing, for which purpose many aircraft were equipped with a winch and wind-driven re-winding gear on the port side of the rear cockpit controlling a cable drum.
Six Shark seaplanes, designated IIA, were sold to the Portuguese- Navy in 1935, three of them being fitted with a huge 160-gallon long range ventral fuel tank. The RCAF also adopted the...

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Image of IHS Jane's All the World's Aircraft in Service: 2012-2013

Janes All the Worlds Aircraft: in Service 2012 - 2013

Jane's All the World's Aircraft Jamie Hunter

IHS "Jane's All the World's Aircraft: In Service" delivers comprehensive, detailed reference information on out of full production civil and military aircraft currently in service around the world. IHS "Jane's All the World's Aircraft: In Service" provides detailed insights into civil and military air platforms currently in service and out of full production around the world, enabling A&D businesses to identify revenue opportunities through maintenance, retrofit and upgrade programs, and supporting military and security organizations by delivering reliable open-source intelligence on existing global offensive and defensive airborne capabilities.

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Airdata file

Volume 7, Issue 4, 1974, Air International

Technical data, photographs and general arrangement drawings for the Bellanca Model 8 Scout and Convair Model 200.

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FIGHTER A TO Z

Volume 7, Issue 4, 1974, Air International

Continuing the AIR INTERNATIONAL encyclopdia of the world's fighter aircraft, from the Breguet 17 to Brewster 239

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PLANE FACTS

Volume 7, Issue 4, 1974, Air International

Answers to readers' enquiries from the AIR INTERNATIONAL files: Douglas B-7, Mikoyan Ye-2A and Ju 52/3mge

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AIRBUS: EUROPE'S FIRST WIDEBODY

Volume 7, Issue 3, 1974, Air International

The Airbus A300 has now entered service, becoming the fourth of the new generation of wide-body airliners to fly revenue passengers. The status of the Airbus programme is discussed in this article, and some impressions of flying in the aircraft are given by the Editor

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Airdata file

Volume 7, Issue 2, 1974, Air International

Technical data, photographs and general arrangement drawings for the RFB Fanliner, Bell XV-15 and Sikorsky S-70.

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FLYING THE CURTISS P-40s

Volume 7, Issue 2, 1974, Air International

HA Taylor

A further contribution to our popular "Viewed from the Cockpit" series by H A "Tony" Taylor, in which he recalls the characteristics of the Tomahawk and Kittyhawk as used by the RAF in the early years of World War II.

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FLY WITH A STING

Volume 7, Issue 2, 1974, Air International

Pushpindar Singh Chopra

The Gnat light fighter has proved to be one of the most cost-effective weapons in the inventory of the Indian Air Force. From New Delhi, AIR INTERNATIONAL'S correspondent Pushpindar Chopra describes the production and operational record of the Gnat in India.

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LIGHTWEIGHT FIGHTER - The General Dynamics approach

Volume 7, Issue 2, 1974, Air International

The General Dynamics YF-16 is one of the two new combat aircraft now in flight test under the USAF Lightweight Fighter programme, which may lead in due course to the introduction of this category of warplane into operational service. The YF-16 configuration is fully described and illustrated in this article, which includes a cutaway drawing.

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Skyrocket

Volume 22, Issue 07, 1994, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Bob Martin , David Lucabaugh

In the concluding part of their feature on Grummans extra-ordinary XF5F Skyrocket, David Lucabaugh and Bob Martin cover the flight testing and modifications carried out on the prototype, and the companys negotiations with the US Navy

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Bristols Swan Song

Volume 22, Issue 07, 1994, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Barry Jones

In his 14th article on British post-war experimental Jet aircraft, Barry Jones describes the exotic stainless-steel Bristol 188, the company\'s first - and last - turbojet type. Colour artwork by the author

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Vogt\'s Viking

Volume 22, Issue 07, 1994, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Hans Amtmann

In the late 1930s the Hamburg based Blohm und Voss aircraft company produced a number of innovative flying boat designs - the biggest by far being the BV 222 Wiking, the largest production flying boat of World War Two. Hans H. Amtmann, who was a senior member of chief engineer Richard Vogt\'s team, presents a designers view of the 150ft-span six engined giant

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Two hundred thousand perforations

Volume 18, Issue 05, 1990, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

MP Marsh

Not an advert for a well-known brand of British teabag, but the essential ingredient in the high-lift wing of the one-off experimental Marshall The one-off experimental Marshall M.A.4 of 1961, described by M. P. Marsh

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Sidestrand and Overstrand

Volume 22, Issue 12, 1994, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Phillip Jarrett

Philip Jarreu concludes his two-part account of the development and production history of a pair of Boulton & Paul bombers

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Hawker Hart and Hind

Volume 23, Issue 08, 1995, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Owen Thetford

Owen Thetford concludes his account of the classic Hawker Hart and Hind family, while Frank Munger depicts the Hart in a superb new cutaway drawing.
 
In our continuing series on the RAF's classic inter-war biplane bombers, Owen Thetford concludes his account of the Hawker Hart and Hind family, describing the Service life of the Hind and providing details of production, unit allocations and squadron markings

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FIGHTER A TO Z

Volume 46, Issue 4, 1994, Air International

Continuing the AIR International encyclopaedia of the world's fighter aircraft, with more aircraft from the Sukhoi stable; the P-1, Su-7B, Su-11 (II), and Su-15 (II).

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The Staaken E/320 - A four-engined all-metal airliner of 1920

Volume 6 Issue 04, 1973, Aircraft illustrated

Alex Imrie

ADOLF Karl Rohrbach was born in Gotha on March 28, 1889. He was educated at the Technische Hochschule in Darmstadt where he studied shipbuilding. On completion of his studies he received a diploma and went to work for Blohm und Voss in Hamburg. He joined Luftschiffbau-Zeppelin in 1914 and worked under various designers, amongst them Claude Dornier who was engaged on the design and construction of all-metal aircraft. He spent much of his time with Professor Baumann of the Technische Hochschule Stuttgart on design and stressing problems for large all-metal cantilever monoplanes, and after the war, when Rohrbach became the chief designer for Zeppelin-Werke GmbH Staaken on Staaken aerodrome near Berlin , he devoted himself to this prototype.

Because of the uncertainties of the peace treaty and the restrictions imposed by the Allied Control Commission many difficulties had to be overcome before construction commenced on the design which was to provide a fast transport monoplane...

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Meet the family - Fokker Friendship

Volume 6 Issue 03, 1973, Aircraft illustrated

Peter R March

THE F-27 Friendship was designed in the early 1950s as a Dakota replacement and has more nearly achieved this than any other short-range transport . At the end of 1972 nearly 600 (including Fairchild variants) were on order or had been delivered .

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Gloster F9/37

Volume 6 Issue 03, 1973, Aircraft illustrated

Derek N James

But to return to the F.9/37, this was the last piston engined type to be designed by George Carter. Gloster Aircraft' s chief designer prior to World War II, and stemmed from a four-year series of projects which had begun in 1933. In that year Specification F.5/ 33 was issued, calling for a turret-armed two-seat fighter to replace the ageing Hawker Demon. Three companies undertook design studies, among which was Gloster whose project to this specification had two 635hp Bristol Aquila sleeve-valve radial engines and a power-operated four gun turret. Two years later Gloster's further design studies on a project to meet Specification F.34/35 prod uced a proposal for another twin engined two seat fighter with both fixed nose-mounted armament and a power-operated four gun turret. Progress was such that the RAF serial number K8625 was allocated for use on the first prototype aeroplane but further work on the contract was abandoned when the Boulton Paul Defiant, originally designed...

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The Martin Baker MB2

Volume 6 Issue 02, 1973, Aircraft illustrated

"An ingenious, unorthodox and unlucky fighter of yersteryear was The Martin-Baker MB2"

THE Martin- Baker MB-2 was the first fighter built by the company founded in 1926 at Denham, Bucks, by James Martin (now Sir James Martin and originator of the worldfamous Martin -Baker ejector-seats) and the late Captain Valentine H. Baker . The sole prototype, allocated th e civil registration G-AEZD but initially marked M-B-I and later serialled P9594 when purchased by the Air Ministry for evaluation at Martlcsham Heath, was built to AM Specification F4 /34 and first flew on August 3, 1938, from Harwell Berks, piloted by Captain Baker.

Originally the rudder extended only to the height of the fuselage rear frame, but this immediately proved inadequate and a rudimentary fin was fitted above the tailplane, Service test pilots at Martlesham Heath, where the MB-2 was tested in November 1938, pronounced the plane unstable about all axes , generally unpleasant to fly due to its lack...

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Image of Superfortress, the Boeing B-29 - Aircraft Specials series (6028)

Superfortress, the Boeing B-29 - Aircraft Specials series (6028)

Steve Birdsall

Softcover, Squadron/Signal Publications-Texas 1980, From the library of John Molinari, R. O. (A.I.) 8th, R.A.F. & 9th Air Force, (NOTE: I have over 50 books from his personal library-most have his service dates inscribed) , in Very Good Condition, just a touch of shelf wear to covers and edges...Previous owner name and service dates on title page... no notes or writing-All pages are bright, clean and crisp... ISBN-0897471040...Thanks for supporting a small family business ...LOC SSM-7

The design, production and testing of the B-29 Superfortress was one of the most notable achievements of American Industry. Less than five years after the Boeing Company submitted its design for the world's first truly strategic bomber, the B-29s were laying waste to Japan.
The B-29 was an airplane of superlatives...the world's first pressurized bomber, the world's heaviest production airplane, with the most powerful engines and highest wing loading.
The proof of the design's inherent excellence was the fact that all 3,960 Superfortresses differed little from each other, or from the basic design. In fact, when the first flight of the XB-29 took place on September 21, 1942, six

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Miles memories

Volume 6 Issue 02, 1973, Aircraft illustrated

Mention the name "Miles" to anyone who remembers the Woodley(Reading) based aircraft constructor of yesteryear and they will inevitably picture aesthetically pleasing sporting monoplanes, yellow-bellied RAF trainers, and some distinctly futuristic-looking designs which seemed to have been inspired by Flash Gordon films or artists fanciful creations in Modern Wonder.

This month we look back at the wartime trainers and target-tugs, including the affectionately-remembers "Maggie" elementary trainer and that other workhorse the Master, which in its original form, was responsible for training many of the pilots who fought in the Battle of Britain...

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340: the Story

Bo Sehlberg

In 1980, when Saab-Scania decided to manufacture a civil passenger aircraft for about thirty passengers, they entered one of the largest industrial projects a Swedish company had ever invested in.

The project was so large that they needed a partner. Fairchild Industries were in the United States. They too, just like Saab-Scania, wanted to construct a new passenger aircraft, but did not dare without a partner. The investment would be gigantic. The money had to be invested on a long-term basis and the profitability was uncertain. Marcus Wallenberg became personally involved in the matter.Fairchild Industries' chairman of the board was the eccentric Ed Uhl

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Image of Buccaneer: The Story of the Last All-British Strike Aircraft

Buccaneer: The Story of the Last All-British Strike Aircraft

Tim Laming

The history and operation of the Blackburn (later British Aerospace) Buccaneer strike aircraft is traced in this book from initial design development through to retirement from the Royal Air Force and South African Air Force service. The Buccanneer began life as a carrier-borne nuclear-armed strike aircraft but when the Royal Navy lost its large aircraft carriers it was transferred to the RAF. Final operations of this popular two-seater took place during the Gulf War. The book details the Buccaneer Fleet Air Arm career including the story of the "Torrey Canyon" super tanker incident, and also gives technical description and data including construction, weaponry and performance figures.

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Boulton Paul's dicey deltas

Volume 21, Issue 02, 1993, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Barry Jones

In the sixth of his articles on British post war experimental jet aircraft Barry Jones describes the Boulton Paul P.111 and P.120, both of which raised the company test pilots blood pressure. 

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Ryan Fireball

Volume 5 Issue 10, 1972, Aircraft illustrated

R J Coles , RJ Coles

IN late 1942 the US Navy decided that a composite-powered aircraft was the next logical step for improving the performance of carrier- based aircraft. Tests indicated that such an aircraft could meet the enemy at any altitude without any fall-off in performance. Pure Jet aircraft had deemed themselves impractical in 1942 due to a long take-off run and fairly high landing speed. Also, the delay in response associated withh rapid throttle opening on jet engines was unfavourable for carrier operations.

Proposals for a composite -powered fighter were outlined to nine aircraft manufacturers simultaneously, and of these the winner of the contract was Ryan Aeronautical Corporation...

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Concorde

Volume 5 Issue 09, 1972, Aircraft illustrated

CONCORDE-with its Russian counterpart, the Tu- 144 - is defined as the fastest airliner in the world ; what is often unrecognised is the matching subsonic capability and the meet ing of stringent demands of airfield compatibility . Concorde not only cruises twice as fast as contemporary long range jets, but equals their holding, diversion, approach and climb-out performance with out need for specialised ground aids, equipment or longer runways....

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Stop-gap transport - Sidelights on the Avro York

Volume 5 Issue 07, 1972, Aircraft illustrated

Alan J Wright

UNLIKE its now famous relative the Lancaster , the Avro York did not burst on to the wartime scene as a result of a spectacular operation . On the contrary it was very slow in entering service.

Roy Chadwick, Avro' s chief designer , had turned his attention towards a transport even before the Lancaster had embarked on its successful career. Drawings were completed in February 1942, the prototype taking to the air on July 5 of the same year. Really only the fuselage was actually designed since the rest of the necessary equipment-wings, engines, tail etc- were inherited from the bomber , There was no doubt it was badly needed by the RAF However, priorities had to be kept straight and the bomber offensive was deemed more important ....

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Hawker Siddeley Harrier Mk 52

Volume 5 Issue 07, 1972, Aircraft illustrated

RJ Coles

A special feature for modellers by RJ Coles

THE Hawker 5iddeley Harrier Mk 52, a two - seat demonstration aircraft carrying the very appropriate civil registrati on G-VTOL, was built in 1971 as a combined venture with the aerospace and equipment companies which have a major stake in the Harrier. The airframe is basically that of a TMk 2 and the original powerplant was a civil certificated Rolls-Royce: (Bristol Engine Division ) Pegasus 102 engine of 20,000lb ....

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Image of North American P-51 Mustang Portfolio (Aircraft Portfolio)

North American P-51 Mustang

Aircraft Portfolio's RM Clarke

A seldom seen Fine softcover, its contents are tight, bright and clean, free of any internal markings or personalizations. Now in a protective sealed plastic bag.

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Image of Avro Lancaster (Aircraft Portfolio)

Avro Lancaster

Aircraft Portfolio's RM Clarke

One of a series comprising technical descriptions - cutaway drawings - genealogy - combat and operational reports from contemporary articles from Flight, The Aeroplane and Aircraft Production, with modern material from Aeroplane Monthly.

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Image of Hawker Hurricane (Aircraft Portfolio S.)

Hawker Hurricane

Aircraft Portfolio's RM Clarke

Articles reprinted from Flight and Aeroplane.

This book is a collection of articles and a fascinating look at one of the famous fighter aircraft of World War Two. It has 22 articles from 1938 to 1985 with technical descriptions, cutaway drawings, genealogy, combat and operational reports from contemporary articles from Flight and The Aeroplane with modern material from Aeroplane Monthly.

Softcover, 70 pages, 200mm x 270mm, b&w photos

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No. 39 - Supermarine Spitfire in Action

Aircraft in Action Jerry Scutts

At the time of Its inception there was nothing to match the Supermarine Spitfire for sheer grace of line and, while one might argue its claim to be the most esthetically appeal. Mg single seat fighter to emerge from the Second World War, there are surely few contenders for the title. With a combat record second to none, the Spitfire exemplified the part played by the RAF to gain final victory in that conflict, and to the British nation was far more than just another airplane that had helped to win the war. People saw It as the single weapon that had preserved a way of life at a time when everything they held dear was in the greatest danger of being forcibly changed forever. it mattered little to the man in the street that the Spitfire's part in the Battle of Britain was numerically less than that of the Hurricane, for it was the Supermarine fighter that caught the public imagination In a way that was probably unique. Certainly few fighter aircraft were more aptly named; in squadron...

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No. 39 - Supermarine Spitfire in Action

Aircraft in Action Jerry Scutts

At the time of Its inception there was nothing to match the Supermarine Spitfire for sheer grace of line and, while one might argue its claim to be the most esthetically appeal. Mg single seat fighter to emerge from the Second World War, there are surely few contenders for the title. With a combat record second to none, the Spitfire exemplified the part played by the RAF to gain final victory in that conflict, and to the British nation was far more than just another airplane that had helped to win the war. People saw It as the single weapon that had preserved a way of life at a time when everything they held dear was in the greatest danger of being forcibly changed forever. it mattered little to the man in the street that the Spitfire's part in the Battle of Britain was numerically less than that of the Hurricane, for it was the Supermarine fighter that caught the public imagination In a way that was probably unique. Certainly few fighter aircraft were more aptly named; in squadron...

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By Day And By Night

Volume 24, Issue 01, 1996, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Owen Thetford

Owen Thetford provides full details of the Service history of the RAF's last biplane bomber, the distinctive Handley Page Heyford, which mercifully was replaced just in time to avoid operational use in the Second World War

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Nothing ventured . . . No 20: Heston Trainer

Volume 19, Issue 12, 1991, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Phillip Jarrett

In part 20 of his continuing series Philip Jarrett describes the unlovely Heston T. 1/37 trainer prototype of 1938

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Nothing ventured...No 23 Vickers type 432

Volume 20, Issue 03, 1992, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Philip Jarrett

Philip Jarrett describes the Vickers type 432 high-altitude interceptor, a 1942 one-off whos shape earned it the nickname "Tin Mossie"

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Fighter A to Z

Volume 1, Issue 3, 1971, Air International

Covered this month the Airco D.H.5 to the Albatros D VI

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The "Halfway House" Fokker

Volume 1, Issue 3, 1971, Air International

History of the Fokker D XXI with tone three view and cutaway drawings

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Mig-21 - Air Superiority Soviet Style

Volume 1, Issue 3, 1971, Air International

Analysis of the Soviet Union's foremost fighter, with new material on the distinguishing features of versions up to the Fishbed J

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Nocturnal 'Meatbox'

Volume 5 Issue 06, 1972, Aircraft illustrated

John Ellis

An ex RAF pilot's reminisences of the Meteor night fighter.

"IN revamping the Gloster twin jet fighter design to take airborne interception equipment (AI), Armstrong Whitworth produced a very strong, beautifully constructed, versatile aircraft, capable of much more than basic night fighting .

In spite of its relatively high all-up weight (20500lb ), it could outmanoeuvre its day fighter contemporaries below 5 000ft, and was only really outclassed at any height , from a " dog fighting" point of view, by Vampires and Venoms. This is not to say that it was faster than the others. In fact , maximum indi cated airspeed at 430kt was somewhat lower than the day fighter Meteors. However , the practical Mach limit (without wing tanks) was about the same at 0.81M. One would have had great difficulty in actually hitting anything at 0.81 due to the porpoising and general cavorting about that went on; similarly around 0.76M with wing tanks fitted, when high aileron forces became...

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de Havilland Comet 1 to 3 - Part I

Volume 5 Issue 05, 1972, Aircraft illustrated

Philip J Birtles

"EARLY in 1943 the Brabazon Committee was formed to consider the types of civil transport aircraft the British Aircraft industry should build at the end of hostilities to regain the wartime lead in transport types from the Americans. One of the aircraft recommended by the committees was the Brabazon IV- a pure jet airliner and de Havilland, who had investigated a jet powered Flamingo airliner, decided to go ahead with this revolutionary transport project.

With America

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The Fleet's Firebrand

Volume 5 Issue 05, 1972, Aircraft illustrated

Mike Byrne

"ONE of my first recollections of the Blackburn B.37 Firebrand was as a young stressman some thirty years ago, helping to work out the loads on the undercarriage fairing. Being war-time we were dispersed from the airfield to avoid being bombed and we worked in a wooden hut adjacent to Brough golf course. Having just recently completed my apprentice training and attained a diploma in aeronautics I was full of fresh enthusiasm and bright ideas which resulted my first brush with authority.

If you look at the undercarriage fairing it is obvious that the ground crew would use it as a step to jump up on to the wing for quick access to the engine. I stressed accordingly, and was reprimanded for producing a fairing that was too strong, and therefore, too heavy. The solution, I was told , was to paint " No Step" on the fairing. Needless to say generations of matelots leapt on and off the fairings.

The Firebrand dated back to December 1939 when Naval Staff Requirement N.9/39...

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Bristol Bulldog Squadron Markings

Volume 5 Issue 02, 1972, Aircraft illustrated

Alf Granger

Part 1 of a comprehensive ready-reference guide

"Chosen by the RAF to replace the Armstrong Whitworth Siskin and Gloster Gamecock, the Bristol Bulldog was an all-metal, fabric-covered, single seat fighter biplane powered by a 490 hp Bristol Jupiter VIIF of VIIFB air-cooled radial engine. The protortpe Mk I flew in May 1927, the prototype Mk II in January 1928 and production Bulldogs entered squadron service in June 1929 - with 3 Squadron at Upavon, Wiltshire..."

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UK Oddbird

Volume 4 Issue 11, 1971, Aircraft illustrated

Flown for the first time on August 24, 1971, at BAC's Wisley airfield in the hands of its designer, Mr David Lockspeiser, was the Locksperser Land Development Aircraft, a 70 per cent scale model of a new British utility aeroplane described as a "Low cost Land-Rover"

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Top Of The Class

Volume 24, Issue 06, 1996, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Rod Brown

To mark the final retirement of the de Havilland Canada Chipmunk trainer from the RAF after 46 years' service, Rod Brown looks at the type's early days in the UK and its official tests against the now obscure Fairey Primer

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Slow and Slender

Volume 22, Issue 09, 1994, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Barry Jones

Barry Jones spotlights the H.P.115 delta research jet
For the subject of his 15th article on post-war experimental jet aircraft, Barry Jones turns to the low-speed end of the performance spectrum and spotlights the Handley Page HP.115, which yeilded valuable data for the Concorde programme. Colour centre-spread artwork by the author

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Image of F-14 Tomcat in action - Aircraft Color Series No. 206

F-14 Tomcat in action - Aircraft Color Series No. 206

Lou Drendel

The first F-14A rolled out of the Grumman plant in late 1970. The Tomcat became a combat-proven air superiority fighter and continued the U.S. Navy's long tradition of strike fighters. The Tomcat attained speeds greater than Mach 2 with its twin afterburning turbofan engines. The versatile aircraft performed the role of fleet air defense, fighter escort, tactical air reconnaissance and air-to-surface strike fighter. This all-color In Action book is the perfect complement to the author's other book, "Tomcat!" This reissue features four new pages with color photographs and On Display locations. The book features more than 100 color photos, line drawings, color paintings and seven color profiles.

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Image of C-141 Starlifter in Action - Aircraft Color Series No. 215

C-141 Starlifter in Action - Aircraft Color Series No. 215

Aircraft in Action John Burford

During its long, active life with the military, the C-141 Starlifter has carried troops and equipment in the Vietnam War, Operation Urgent Fury in Granada, Operation Just Cause in Panama, Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm in Saudi Arabia, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operations in Afghanistan. Despite the Starlifter's long history, the struggle to acquire what would become the C-141 was a long story in itself. Thanks to the fight Lt General William Tunner, the Military Air Transport Service's commander from 1958 to 1960, waged to obtain an aircraft dedicated to carrying cargo and troops, the Starlifter did come to fruition. The first C-141 rolled out of the Lockheed Plant in Georgia on 22 August 1963 to much fanfare. From there, in war and peace, the C-141's story has been lifted to the stars of aviation history. Illustrated with over 150 color and 8 b/w photographs, 3-view drawing, 3-scheme color camouflage art, and color profiles. 58 pages.

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Fighter A to Z

Volume 50, Issue 2, 1996, Air International

Continuing the Air International encyclopasdia of the worlds fighter aircraft, this month covering Voughts F-8A to F-8L (F8U-I & F8U-2) Crusader, Vought F8U-3, Vultee 48 and Vultee XP-54

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Airdata file

Volume 50, Issue 2, 1996, Air International

Technical data, photographs and general arrangement drawings of the Mikoyan 1-42, IPTN N-2130 and Myasischev/NAL M-102 Saras/Duet

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Iberian 'Gustav' - The Long-Serving Spanish Messerschmitts

Volume 62, March 1996, Air Enthusiast

Salvador Mafe Huertas

Spains licence production of the BF 109G and its development into the Merlin-engined Buchon. Includes cutaway artwork

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Fighter A to Z

Volume 50, Issue 3, 1996, Air International

Continuing the Air International encyclopaedia of the world's fighter aircraft, this month covering the WACO CSO-A and CTO-A, Weiss EM-23 and Westland N.IB and Wagtail

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Fighter A to Z

Volume 50, Issue 5, 1996, Air International

Continuing the Air International Encyclopaedia of the world's fighter aircraft, this month covering the Westland F.7/30, Whirlwind, Welkin I, Welkin NF Mk.II and Wyvern TF Mk.I

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The de Havilland DH 108 Story

Volume 4 Issue 10, 1971, Aircraft illustrated

Philip J Birtles

PHILIP J . BIRTLES tells the story of the remarkable de Havilland DH 108

"WITH the high speeds made possible by the advent of the gas turbine engine, aircra ft designers were brought face to face with a major problem in aerodynamics-compressibitity. The onset of compressibility could be delayed by employing a swept wing, which had better drag characteristics than a straight wing. Higher speeds-could, therefore, be achieved before the severe drag rise set in...."

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USAFE PHANTOMS IN GERMANY

Airdoc - Post WW II Combat Aircraft Series (ADP) Christian Martin

This new series of English text (with German summary and captions) monographs has unit-by-unit coverage of the USAF F-4s based in Europe, copiously illustrated in colour throughout. 47 colour profiles. 155 colour photos. 52 pages. A4 softback

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The Su-22 in German Service

Andreas Jahnke , Ralf & Klein

Fourth in this series of English text (with German summary and captions) monographs has detailed coverage of the Su-22s that saw service in the DDR and, later, unified Germany. This series sets new standards, being copiously illustrated in colour throughout. 1:50 foldout plans. 11 colour profiles. 199 colour photos. 68 pages. A4 softback

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French Deltas Airdoc Post WW II Combat Aircraft Series No. 11 the Dassault Mirage 2000 Over Europe Part 1

Friedrich List

Another in this series with English text (with German summary and captions) monographs has coverage of the French Deltas copiously illustrated in colour throughout. A4, soft back, 72 pages, full colour, approx. 220 pictures, colour graphics + b/w scale drawings.

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Image of Swedish VIGGENs: The Saab AJ/JA/SF/SH and SK37 Viggen in Flygvapnet (Swedish Air Force) Service

Swedish Viggens Airdoc Post WW II Combat Aircraft Series ADP 015 - The Saab AJ/JA?SF?SH and SK37 Viggen in Flygvapnet (Swedish Air Force) Service" -

Jan Jorgensen

The Saab AJ/JA/SF/SH & SK37 Viggen in Swedish Air Forvce Service. Another in this series of English text (with German summary and captions), copiously illustrated in colour throughout.A4, soft back, 72 pages, full colour, approx. 220 pictures, colour graphics + b/w scale drawings.

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Image of Swedish VIGGENs: The Saab AJ/JA/SF/SH and SK37 Viggen in Flygvapnet (Swedish Air Force) Service

Swedish Viggens Airdoc Post WW II Combat Aircraft Series ADP 015 - The Saab AJ/JA?SF?SH and SK37 Viggen in Flygvapnet (Swedish Air Force) Service" -

Jan Jorgensen

The Saab AJ/JA/SF/SH & SK37 Viggen in Swedish Air Forvce Service. Another in this series of English text (with German summary and captions), copiously illustrated in colour throughout.A4, soft back, 72 pages, full colour, approx. 220 pictures, colour graphics + b/w scale drawings.

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Fluglehrzentrum F-4F Airdoc Modern Combat Aircraft Special Series No. 01

Wilfried Zetsche

A series of English text (with German summary and captions) monographs has unit-by-unit coverage of the USAF F-4s based in Europe, copiously illustrated in colour throughout. 47 colour profiles. 155 colour photos. 52 pages. A4 softback

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Image of Boeing Kc-135 Stratotanker: More Than Just a Tanker (Aerofax Series)

Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker

Aerofax Robert S Hopkins

This highly readable text follows the development and service use of this globe-trotting aircraft. It takes the reader through the wide range of tasks it has performed, including transport, tanker, weather recce, reconnaissance and intelligence gathering, special operations, airborne command post and test-bed.

Every variant and sub-variant is charted and the histories of each aircraft are found within. Includes details of the hundreds of units, past and present, that have flown Stratotanker. For military and aviation enthusiasts.

Robert S. Hopkins III is a former U.S. Air Force pilot. He commanded an RC-135 Rivet Joint Crew during Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm.

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Latest from Long Beach - A look at the McDonnell Douglas DC-10 wide bodied tri-jet

Volume 4 Issue 06, 1971, Aircraft illustrated

THE McDonnell Douglas DC-10 is a three-engine, multirange jetl iner embodying advanced technological concepts to fulfill the expanding needs of air transportation during the 1970s. It combines "wide body" passenger comfort with high speed and low operating costs for new standards of airline service.

Produced in Long Beach, California, by the Douglas Aircraft Company division of McDonnell Douglas Corporation, the DC-10 can accommodate from 270 passengers in a typical first class and coach arrangement to 345 passengers in an all-economy configuration.

First order for the DC-10 was announced on February 19, 1968, and engineering design began in January 1968, McDonnell Douglas announced commitment to produce the tri-jet on April 25, 1968, Manufacturing began on January 6, 1969, and the first DC-10 was rolled out on July 23, 1970 ; and the first flight took place on August 29.

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The HS 121 Trident 1

Volume 4 Issue 04, 1971, Aircraft illustrated

Philip J Birtles

"IN the House of Commons, London, on Wednesday February 12, 1958, Harold Watkinson , Minister of Transport and Civil Aviation, announced the decision of the British Government that British Eu ropean Airways would negotiate for the building of its 1964 Jet airliner, to follow the Comet 4B, with the new company in which de Havilland, Hunting Aircraft and Fairey Aviation were participating. The initial letter of intent was for 24 aircra ft with an option on a further 12 of this first example of the second-generation jet airliners.

Even at this time the merging of industrial effort was the only sure way of standing a chance of gaining any large orders, and it was for this reason that the Aircraft Manufacturing Co Ltd was revived from the early days of the DH design s before the 1914-1918 war...."

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Spitfires Galore

Number 204, July 1998, Flypast magazine

Robert Rudhall

Report on the great spitfire gathering at Duxford; Plus fold out drawing, cutaway, colour side views and a list of airworthy survivors!

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Nocturnal Vampire: The de Havilland Vampire NF10 in RAF service. 1951-1959

Volume 4 Issue 02, 1971, Aircraft illustrated

Roger Levy

HAD it not been for the need to rapidly expand Britain's air defences in the early 19505 as a natural result of worsening East-west relations, and the added impetus provided by the outbreak of the Korean War , it is doubtful whether either the de Havilland Vampire or Venom night fighters would ever have seen service with the RAF.

In 1950 the standard RAF night fighter was the Mosquito NF36 equipped with AI (Airborne Interception) Mk 10 radar-combination which had not changed since the latter part of World War II . The RAF's first jet night fighter, the Meteor NF11 , was not expected to enter service until the following year (and even this aircraft retained the same, faithful old AI Mk10 radar). Against this back ground it was deemed expedient to order a small number of Vampire night fighters which providentially became available at the time.

The DH 113 Vampire night fighter had been privately developed by de Havilland from the Mark 6 single-seat fighter, from which...

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Whoosh! - The saga of the attacks by Gloster Meteors on the world air speed record in 1945 and 1946

Volume 3 Issue 11, 1970, Aircraft illustrated

Derek N James

THE story behind Great Britain's successful attacks on the world air speed record in 1945 and 1946 goes back to the latter part of 1944. During development of the Gloster Meteor FIII it was found that at speeds around 0.75 MN serious shock stalling over the nacelle was causing severe buffeting, and in consequence the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Famborough undertook a series of wind tunnel tests to find a satisfactory nacelle shape which would improve the high speed characteristics of the Meteor and allow it to reach greater Mach numbers. The results of these tunnel tests showed that the breakaway of the airflow around the nacelle could be postponed to a higher speed by increasing the length of the nacelle both in rront of and behind the wings. Accordingly a production Meteor FI, EE211, was modified by extending forward the noses of the nacelles and this aircraft was flown for the first time in this configuration in November 1944. The air tests were so encouraging that the...

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Image of Ju-87 in Foreign Service

Ju 87 in Foreign Service

MMP Books - Orange Miroslaw Wawrzynski

This is the story of the Foreign Service of the famous German dive-bomber JU 87 Stuka. Service history in Hungarian, Rumanian, Italian and other Air Forces.* Superb colour illustrations of camouflage and markings, and rare b+w archive photographs. * Essential reading for aviation enthusiasts, aviation historians & scale aeromodellers.

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Image of Macchi MC.202 Folgore

Macchi Mc.202 Folgore

MMP Books - Orange Przemyslaw Skulski

Shown development of the most famoust Italian WWII fighter. It contains: Scale plans * photos and drawings from Technical Manuals * Superb colour illustrations of camouflage and markings, rare b+w archive photographs. Colour photos of the preserved aircraft* Essential reading for aviation enthusiasts & scale aeromodellers.

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Image of Westland Lysander: The British Spy Plane of World War II

Westland Lysander

MMP Books - Orange James Kightly

The Westland Lysander became famous for picking up and dropping secret agents into Nazi occupied Europe on moonlit nights. Yet this was only one of the aircraft

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Image of Fiat CR.42 Falco

Fiat CR.42 Falco

MMP Books - Orange Przemyslaw Skulski

The Fiat CR42 Falco, was the Regia Aeronautica's last biplane fighter in a period when the monoplane had already gained predominance, yet was the combat aircraft built in the greatest number by the Italians during World War II. 1,781 of these agile and robust aircraft came off the production lines - despite the presence of (and the need for) more modern and competitive planes. It was also a successful export, seeing service in the liveries of Belgium, Hungary and Sweden. This book focuses on a rarely documented aspect of World War Two aviation history. It includes superb colour illustrations of camouflage and markings, walk-around colour photographs and rare b+w archive photographs. It is essential reading for aviation enthusiasts and scale aero-modellers.

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Image of BREGUET 693 (French Edition)

BREGUET 693

Arnaud Prudhomme

Derived from the Breguet 690 which was built at the beginning of 1936, the Breguet 693 had its baptism by fire in May 1940: eleven aircraft of the GBA 1/54 were engaged in the region of Maastricht against the Germans. Unfortunately the ground assault tactic utilized proved to be disastrous, rendering the aircraft particularly vulnerable and ten among them, decimated by the flak, never returned.

The Breguet 693, a two-seat twin-engine bomber carrying a pilot and a machine gun back-to-back, was also one of the first French aircraft to be equipped with radio communication.

Like many units however, the assault groups were eventually pulled out of North Africa, and due the German occupation, this particular model saw no other future developments.

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Image of Blackburn Skua and Roc (Orange Series)

Blackburn Roc & Skua

MMP Books - Orange Matthew Willis

The development and operational history of the Skua, and its turret-fighter derivative the Roc, are told in this book. Designed as a dive-bomber, a role it excelled in, the Skua was also used (with much less success) as a fighter, and later as a target tug. The Roc, naval equivalent of the Defiant, was even less successful than its RAF counterpart.

The book contains: superb color illustrations of camouflage and markings, rare b/w archive photographs, and first hand accounts of Skua operations. Essential reading for aviation enthusiasts, historians & scale aeromodellers.

The Blackburn Skua was the Fleet Air Arm

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Image of Gloster Gamecock and Grebe (Orange)

Gloster Grebe & Gamecock

MMP Books - Orange Tim Kershaw

This book describes the design, development and use of these aircraft and the many variants and prototypes derived from them. Profusely illustrated with many rare photos, this is the most comprehensive study of these designs yet published. The book includes scale plans, full-color profiles, and detail photos, including many of the Gamecock replica lovingly recreated by enthusiasts at Brockworth.

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Image of Saab J21 / J21R (Yellow (MMP Books))

SAAB J21 / J21R

MMP Books - Yellow Mikael Forslund

Detailed monograph on the design and development of the SAAB J21, the classic Swedish fighter. Illustrated with photos throughout, including a comprehensive walk-around section showing all aspects of the airframe, and diagrams from official manuals. Includes 1/72nd scale plans of all variants, and color profiles showing many of the schemes applied to J21.

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Image of Mitsubishi A6M Zero

Mitsubishi A6M Zero

MMP Books - Yellow Artur Juszczak

The illustrated technical history of the most famous Japanese warplane of World War Two. The different versions of the plane, from the 1940 prototypes to the final Kamikaze aircraft of 1945 are described and illustrated; all the changes in specification, equipment and performance are recorded. Drawings and data from the original technical manuals, full dimensional details and photographs of surviving examples preserved in aviation museums illustrate all aspects of the airframe, inside and out. Wartime photographs and many pages of colour illustrations complete the book's comprehensive coverage.

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Image of Gloster Gladiator (Mushroom Magazine special: Yellow series)

Gloster Gladiator

MMP Books - Yellow Alex Crawford

The operational history of the RAF's last biplane fighter, covering all the air forces using this famous aircraft - from Finland to China. The book includes the true story of the legendary defence of Malta. Gladiators flew operations from the burning sands of the African deserts to the frozen tundra of Finland and Russia, and all these operations are documented and illustrated.

The operational history of the RAF's last biplane fighter, covering all the air forces using this famous aircraft - from Finland to China. The book includes the true story of the legendary defence of Malta. Gladiators flew operations from the burning sands of the African deserts to the frozen tundra of Finland and Russia, and all these operations are documented and illustrated. 46 colour profiles. 16 pages of colour detail's photos.

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Image of Messerschmitt Me 262A (Mushroom Model Magazine Special: Yellow Series)

Messerschmitt Me262

MMP Books - Yellow Robert Peczkowski

A technical history of the world's first operational jet fighter, this book illustrates all aspects of the plane, using modern photographs of restored examples, wartime photographs, excerpts from official manuals, scale plans of all day fighter versions and illustrations of camouflage and markings.

An illustrated history of the evolution of the Me 262 A version of most famous World War Two jet fighter aircraft: * How the Me 262 A changed during production from * How to recognise the different versions * Colour photos of preserved aircraft *57 colour profiles.

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Image of PZL P.11C (Yellow Series)

Pzl P11c

MMP Books - Yellow Bartlomiej Belcarz , Tomasz J Kopanski

This is the story of Poland's most famous fighter aircraft.
It contains:
Scale plans
* photos and drawings from Technical Manuals
* Superb color illustrations of camouflage and markings, walk-around color photographs of the only one preserved aircraft and rare b+w archive photographs.
* Essential reading for aviation enthusiasts & scale air modelers.

This is the story of Poland's most famous fighter aircraft. It contains: Scale plans in 1/48 scale* Photos and drawings from Technical Manuals * Superb colour illustrations of camouflage and markings, walk-around colour photographs of the only one preserved aircraft and rare b+w archive photographs. * Essential reading for aviation enthusiasts & scale aeromodellers..

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Image of MITSUBISHI J2M RAIDEN (JACK) (Yellow Series)

Mitsubishi J2M Raiden 'jack'

MMP Books - Yellow Robert Peczkowski

This is the story of Japanese famous fighter aircraft. It contains: Scale plans * photos and drawings from Technical Manuals * Superb color illustrations of camouflage and markings, walk-around color photographs and rare b/w archive photographs. * Essential reading for aviation enthusiasts & scale air modelers.

This is the story of Japanese famous fighter aircraft. It contains: Scale plans * photos and drawings from Technical Manuals * Superb colour illustrations of camouflage and markings, walk-around colour photographs and rare b+w archive photographs. * Essential reading for aviation enthusiasts & scale aeromodellers.

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Image of Boulton Paul Defiant: Technical Details and History of the Famous British Night Fighter

Boulton Paul Defiant

MMP Books - Yellow Mark Ansell

The Boulton Paul Defiant is one Britain's most famous night fighter aircraft. First used as a day, then night during the Battle of Britain; and thus saw service as an auxuilary aircraft. Details are provided of a wide selection of historic machines and fascinating colour schemes, as well as full technical details.

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Image of P-47D Bubbletop

P-47 Thunderbolt Bubbletop

MMP Books - Yellow Robert Peczkowski

It contains: Scale plans * photos and drawings from Technical Manuals * Superb colour illustrations of camouflage and markings, rare b+w archive photographs. Colour photograps of preserved machines * Essential reading for aviation enthusiasts & scale aeromodellers

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Image of MESSERSCHMITT ME 410 (Yellow)

Messerschmitt Me 410

MMP Books - Yellow Robert Peczkowski

This is the illustrated story of the World War Two Me410 twin-engine fighter-bomber and reconnaissance aircraft, which the Luftwaffe High Command commissioned as the successor to the Bf110 "heavy fighter" and the ultimate version of the experimental Me210. In all, 1,160 aircraft were built and the final years of the war the Me410 valiantly defended Germany against the incessant raids of Allied bombers. This work features: scale plans; photographs and drawings from technical manuals; walk-around color photographs; b/w archive photographs; rarely documented aspect of World War Two aviation history covering a lesser know but significant Luftwaffe aircraft; and superb color illustrations of camouflage and markings, detailed color photographs of surviving aircraft and period wartime b/w photographs. It is an essential reading for aviation enthusiasts and scale air modelers.

This is the illustrated story of the World War Two Me410 twin-engine fighter-bomber and reconnaissance aircraft, which the Luftwaffe High Command commissioned as the successor to the Bf110 "heavy fighter" and the ultimate version of the experimental Me210. In all, 1,160 aircraft were built and the final years of the war the Me410 valiantly defended Germany against the incessant raids of Allied bombers. This work features: scale plans; photographs and drawings from technical manuals; walk-around colour photographs; b+w archive photographs; rarely documented aspect of World War Two aviation history covering a lesser know but significant Luftwaffe aircraft; and superb colour illustrations of camouflage and markings, detailed colour photographs of surviving aircraft and period wartime b+w photographs. It is an essential reading for aviation enthusiasts and scale aero-modellers.

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Image of Hawker Hurricane

Hawker Hurricane

MMP Books - Yellow Marek Rys

The Hurricane was the RAF's first monoplane fighter, and was the most numerous RAF fighter during the Battle of Britain. In 1940, more than half the German planes shot down were destroyed by Hurricanes. This book tells the story of its development and technical evolution, profusely illustrated with period b+w photographs and detailed colour photographs of surviving airframes, plus extracts from official manuals and 1/72nd scale plans of all versions, from the Mk.1 of 1936 to the Mk. IV of 1943. This work includes superb colour artwork illustrates the many camouflage schemes and markings found on operational Hurricanes; it features walk-around colour photographs and rare b+w archive photographs and documents. It is essential reading for aviation enthusiasts and scale aero-modellers.

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Image of Yakovlev Yak-9P/Yak 9U

Yakovlev Yak-9P/Yak 9U

MMP Books - Yellow Robert Panek

Developed from the most successful and numerous of Russian World War Two fighters, the Yak-9 was an all-metal fighter used by the Soviet Union and its satellite states (Bulgaria, Poland, Yugoslavia) during and after World War Two, including action in the Korean War. The series of Yakovlev fighters' career (which began during the battle of Stalingrad) involved constant updating, mostly on the armaments side. The 9U and 9P variants were the most advanced. This work features: scale plans; photos and drawings from technical manuals; superb colour illustrations of camouflage and markings; walk-around colour photographs of surviving aircraft; rare b+w archive photographs from World War Two; and rarely documented aspect of World War Two aviation history. It is an essential reading for aviation enthusiasts and scale aero-modellers

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Image of Lockheed P-38 J-L Lightning

Lockheed P-38 J-L Lightning

MMP Books - Yellow Robert Peczkowski

Lockheed's first military aircraft to go into production - the 'fork-tailed devil', twin engined Lightning - was also one of the most famous and effective American fighters of World War Two. Between 1940 and 1945, over 10,000 powerful and versatile P-38 Lightnings were built. This book documents the history of the J to L variants of the plane, from 1943 to 1944 - the most effective and widely used of the entire Lightning family. This was the aircraft that author and aviation legend Antoine de St Exupery was flying when he disappeared. * Rarely documented aspect of World War Two aviation history. * Superb colour illustrations of camouflage and markings, walk-around colour photographs and rare b+w archive photographs. * Essential reading for aviation enthusiasts & scale aero-modellers.

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Image of SUPERMARINE WALRUS & STRANRAER (Yellow Series)

Supermarine Walrus and Stranraer

MMP Books - Yellow James Kightly

The most comprehensive pictorial and technical data on both types ever published. Both were designed by R J Mitchell, who also designed the Spitfire. A summary of the fascinating and peculiar career of the Walrus, air-sea rescue seaplane and maid of all work. The Stranraer had been completely neglected and the details of this maritime patrol bomber's history is illustrated by many previously unpublished photographs and drawings.

The most comprehensive pictorial and technical data on both types ever published. Both were designed by R J Mitchell, who also designed the Spitfire. A summary of the fascinating and peculiar career of the Walrus, air-sea rescue seaplane and maid of all work. The Stranraer had been completely neglected and the details of this maritime patrol bomber's history is illustrated by many previously unpublished photographs and drawings.

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Image of Sea Fury: In British, Australian, Canadian & Dutch Service

Sea Fury: In British, Australian, Canadian & Dutch Service

Tony Buttler

A detailed and profusely illustrated account of the Sea Fury in service. A listing of airframes and histories is included. 5 colour 4-views, 23 colour profiles, and 138 black and white photographs.
144 pages A4 softback

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Image of Attacker: The Royal Navy's First Operational Jet Fighter

Attacker: The Royal Navy's First Operational Jet Fighter

Richard A Franks

Book by Richard A. Franks

A history of the Supermarine Attacker in service from the prototype to the sole remaining preserved example. 4 view and squadron badge illustrations in full colour, with over 80 black and white photographs. A history of all airframes completes the book.
80 pages A 4 softback

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Image of The Avro Shackleton: Guardian of the Sea Lanes

The Avro Shackleton: Guardian of the Sea Lanes

Richard A Franks

The first in a series of detailed and well illustrated accounts of classic aircraft in service from the prototype to the few remaining preserved examples. The introduction to the book is written by an ex-Shackleton pilot who was the first to be on the scene at the fire and sinking of the Lakonia and was instrumental in saving many lives. The book contains over thirty-five specially commissioned accurate side, 4 view and squadron badge illustrations in full colour, with many previously unpublished photographs. A full listing of all airframes and their histories is also included.

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Image of The Avro Shackleton: Guardian of the Sea Lanes

The Avro Shackleton: Guardian of the Sea Lanes

Richard A Franks

The first in a series of detailed and well illustrated accounts of classic aircraft in service from the prototype to the few remaining preserved examples. The introduction to the book is written by an ex-Shackleton pilot who was the first to be on the scene at the fire and sinking of the Lakonia and was instrumental in saving many lives. The book contains over thirty-five specially commissioned accurate side, 4 view and squadron badge illustrations in full colour, with many previously unpublished photographs. A full listing of all airframes and their histories is also included.

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Image of The Nimrod: Mighty Hunter

The Nimrod: Mighty Hunter

Andy Evans

A detailed and generously illustrated account of the Nimrod in service, from the prototypes to the current MRa.4. Thirty five specially commissioned accurate colour profiles, and over 100 black and white photographs. A listing of airframes and histories is included.
80 pages A4 softback

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Image of Hastings: Including a Brief History of the Hermes

Hastings: Including a Brief History of the Hermes

Tim Senior

There were several versions of the Hastings and complete listings of all those and the Hermes are given, plus appendices on squadrons and units, specifications and a list of the 34 Hastings written off in service. Hermes details are similarly listed. Good selection of monochrome and colour illustrations.
112 pages A4 softback

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Image of Scimitar: Supermarine's Last Fighter

Scimitar: Supermarine's Last Fighter

Pilots notes/Flight operating instructions Richard Franks

History of the Scimitar with service career, Scimitar squadrons and production list. With colour side view drawings and well illustrated throughout.
120 pages A4 softback

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Image of Gloster Javelin - the RAF's First Delta Wing Fighter

The Gloster Javelin: The RAF's First Delta Wing Fighter

Richard A Franks

The Gloster Javelin is the second in a series of detailed and well illustrated accounts of classic aircraft in service from the prototype to the few remaining preserved examples. This book contains over sixty-five specially commissioned accurate side, 4 view and squadron badge illustrations in full colour, with over 150 photographs in colour and black and white, many previously unpublished. A full listing of all airframes and their histories is also included.

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Image of Fairey Rotodyne

Fairey Rotodyne

David Gibbings

Fairey's Rotodyne (a British compound autogyro intended for commercial and military applications) was considered to be one of the iconic projects of the 1950 and 1960s and a bright future was planned for the aircraft. Widely believed to be a revolutionary design, it was cheap, fast, and capable of vertical take-off and landing in a small space. An aircraft ahead of its time, there has been little published on the Rotodyne. This book, by Rotodyne expert David Gibbings, seeks to fill a gap in aviation literature and offers a long-awaited full, illustrated, and in-depth history of the Rotodyne, many of whose features are still valued by organisztions such as NASA, highly in demand and used to this day.

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A cat for dogfighting: Northrop's tougher Tiger

Volume 3, Issue 4, 1972, Air International

 While the debut of the F-15 Eagle three months ago was attended by much publicity, another recent US debutanted intended to excel in the close-in, high-g environment of air-to-air combat, the Northrop F-5E Tiger II, has as yet been little publicised. If a less spectacular warplane than the Eagle, the Tiger II is rather more than just another F5, as is explained by this feature

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To Berlin by night ... the Yermolayev bomber

Volume 3, Issue 4, 1972, Air International

 Among the earliest Allied bombers to make an appearance in the night skies of Berlin during WW II was an aircraft that was little known at the time and has remained so ever since - the Yermolayev Yer-2. Hirerto the least-documented of WW II combate aircraft, the YER-2 and its development is described here

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Antipodean Finale

Volume 3, Issue 4, 1972, Air International

 The last piston-engined single-seat fighter prototype to initiate a flight test programme, Australias CA-15 was an anachronism at the time of its debut, but it was nevertheless an outstanding aeroplane, as this feature reveals

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Fighter A to Z

Volume 3, Issue 3, 1972, Air International

 Continuing the Aie Enthusiast encyclopedia of the world's fighter aircraft from the Avia S 199 to the Aviatik D VII

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Tailless tailpiece

Volume 3, Issue 3, 1972, Air International

Alexander Lippish

 Contributing an an exclusive footnote to Captain Brown's account of flying the Me 163, Dr Alexander Lipposch, its designer, traces the steps in its evolution back to the gliders developed on the Wasserkuppe in the late 'twenties

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Viewed from the Cockpit: A brush with exoticism

Volume 3, Issue 3, 1972, Air International

Eric Brown

 Captain Eric Brown, RN, relates, in our "viewed from the cockpit" series, the hitherto untold story of the testing of the Messerschmitt Me 163 in Britain, and its relevance to a projected supersonic research aircraft designed at Farnborough by German engineers

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Ferocious Feline

Volume 3, Issue 3, 1972, Air International

 An account of the concept, developments, design, construction and characteristics of the Anglo-French Jaguar close-support aircraft, including the imressions of one of the team of Jaguar test-pilots and a new cutaway drawing

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The "More Violent Hurricane"

Volume 3, Issue 2, 1972, Air International

 Eventually to become one of World War II's most successful warplanes, the Hawker Typhoon had a somewhat inauspicious beginning. THe trials and tribulations of bringing a new aircraft into production and service under wartime conditions are clearly related in this history

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Germany - by a short nose

Volume 3, Issue 2, 1972, Air International

W Gundermann , Wilhelm Gundermann

 In August 1939, Germany won the race to be the first nation to fly a turbojet-propelled aeroplane, albiet a race concerning the existence of which the participants, working in great secrecy, knew little or nothing. One of the German engineers who worked on the first Heinkel turbojets, Dipl-Ing Wilhelm Gundermann, here tells the story of the world's first aircraft gas turbine.

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Big 'bus - European style

Volume 3, Issue 2, 1972, Air International

The Airbus A300B short-haul large capacity jet transport is about to emerge after a long and unusually difficult period of gestation. Political factors almost led to a still-birth, but as we reveal in this account, the thread of technical development has continued without interuption.
 
Includes details and three views of numerous design concepts from Britain and France that preceeded the A300, including Hawker Siddley HS.132, Nord 600, Breuget Br 124, Hawker Siddley HS.134, HBN 100, HBN 101 and  Sud Galion

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Cobra concept: Recipe for Success?

Volume 3, Issue 2, 1972, Air International

With the P.530 Cobra air superiority fighter, the Northrop Corporation offers a novel variation on the concept of international programmes for aircraft development. Partners are being sought, especially in Europe, to join Northrop in the detail design and testing of the aircraft as a prelininary to setting up production and assembly lines

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Hawker Tempest II

Volume 3 Issue 10, 1970, Aircraft illustrated

Roger Chesneau

AIRCRAFT of the late 1940's do not seem to appeal to kit manufacturers very much, although recently there have been some signs that this situation is beginning to change. One aircraft from this period that can be modelled by converting existing kits is the Hawker Tempest II. First flown in the summer of 1943, it entered service in November, 1945. too late to see action in Wor ld War II . Four hundred and fifty machines were built, equipping the RAF and several foreign air forces, including those of India and
Pakistan

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Lanc with a difference - The Avro Lancaster VI

Volume 3 Issue 09, 1970, Aircraft illustrated

Brian Goulding , Gabett M , Goulding B , Mike Gabett

IN 1943 the Air Ministry issued specification B14/43 for a bomber which would operate at heights of up to 35,000ft, have a far greater range than existing bombers in service, and be powered by the newly-developed and very promising two-stage Rolls-Royce Merlin engine which developed 1 635hp compared with the 1 280hp of the standard Merlin. To meet 814/43 A. V. Roe submitted two designs known as Lancaster IV and V, subsequently renamed Lincoln.

It was obvious that the new engines would also increase the existing Lancaster's all-round performance considerably, so a number of standard machines were earmarked for conve rsion by Rolls-Royce...

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Second century for the Islander

Volume 3 Issue 09, 1970, Aircraft illustrated

Peter R March

THE 200th Britten-Norman Islander is now on the production line at the company's Bcmbridge works, just 12 months after the 100th aircraft was completed, on July 24 1969. Output has now stepped up to 12 aircraft a month and with the Rumanian production line making its contribution of four a month, the pressing demands of customers world wide are now being satisfied.

Detailed design of the twin-engincd Islander light transport, designated the BN2, began in April 1964. By September work had started on the prototype Islander. G-ATCT, and it made its first flight on June 13, 1965. Powered by two 2lOhp Continental 10-360-B engines, it was found to be somewhat down on performance estimates, so it was re-engincd with 260hp Lycoming O-540-E4C5s and the wing-span was increased by four feet to 49ft to improve handling and stability. It first flew in this form on December 17, 1965....

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The Armstron Whitworth Albemarle

Volume 3 Issue 08, 1970, Aircraft illustrated

DESIGN of the Albemarle was initialed by the Bristol Aeroplane Company as the Type 155 to meet Air Ministry Specification B18/38, but responsibility was transferred to Armstrong Whitworth who designated the machine the AW41 and substituted Hercules engines for the Taurus originally planned.

The specification called for a twin-engined reconnaissance bomber, and a feature of the design was the composite steel and wood construction to conserve stra tegic materials and enable the aircraft to be widely sub-contracted outside the aircraft industry. Two prototypes were built (P1360 and P1361) and the second made its maiden flight on March 20, 1940. the first prototype having crushed earlier when the plywood skin was stripped from the upper surface of the
wing in flight....

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Japanese Army Aircraft

Volume 18, Issue 06, 1956, Air Pictorial

Richard M Bueschel

One of the enigmas of World War IT was the aircraft quality and Flying skill of the Imperial Japanese Air Services in the Pacific War 1941-45. Regarded as a second-rate air power equipped with obsolete aircraft copied from foreign designs, the initial striking power of the Japanese came as a rude shock to the Allied forces in the Pacific.

This series of articles will reveal a wealth of new information about the Japanese Army aircraft, and will be accompanied by illustrations which have never before been seen in print.

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1/144th Scale Plan of the Fairey Hendon

Volume 18, Issue 07, 1956, Air Pictorial

DESIGNED to Air Ministry Specification B.19/27, the one and only prototype Fairey Hendon 1 night bomber, serial number K1695, was built in 1930-31. It first flew in November 1931, piloted by Captain Norman Macmillan, M.e., A.F.e., then Fairey's chief test pilot. The Henden, following as it did the last of the R.A. F. 's big biplane bombers, the Handley Page Heyford, was the first cantilever night bomber to be built in Great Britain and was of advanced concept...

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Aircraft of the 1914-18 War - The Spad S.7

Volume 18, Issue 07, 1956, Air Pictorial

Jack M Bruce

THE Spad S.7 was the first truly successful aircraft produced by the Societe pour Aviation et ses Derives, the Bleriot-owned descendant of the Societe pour les Appareils Deperdussin. The S.7's predecessors had been the types A.2, A.4, D and E,

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The Hanriot HD-1

Volume 19, Issue 01, 1957, Air Pictorial

Jack M Bruce

M HANRIOT had given up his interest in aviation before the World War I began, but after the outbreak of hostilities he founded a new company for the manufacture of aircraft. Among the types produced was the Sopwith 1 1/2 Strutter.
In 1916 the first aircraft of the new Hanriot company's own design appeared. It was a pretty little single-seat biplane of conventional wood, wire and fabric construction designed by M. Dupont and named Hanriot HD-l. It was characterised by centre-section bracing similar to that of the Sop with H-Strutter; the upper wings had 4-1/2 of dihedral, whereas the lower mainplanes had none; and the interplane struts were raked outwards. Power was provided by a 110-h.p. Le Rhone rotary engine.

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Aero Commander Six-Eighty Super

Volume 19, Issue 01, 1957, Air Pictorial

Roy Cross

AN estimated 4,300,000 hours were flown in the U.S.A. in 1955 by what the Americans term business aircraft and with a safety factor, incidentally, five times  greater than automobile travel in that country. One of the more successful contenders for this thriving market is the five/seven-seat Aero Commander, currently produced in the basic 560-A and 680-Super versions.
Aero Design and Engineering Company was formed in 1950 at Culver City,  California, to exploit their original L.3805 Aero Commander, designed as a six/seven-seat light transport and powered by twin Lycoming 0-435A horizontally-opposed sixcylinder air-cooled engines giving 190 h.p, each. Cruising speed at 10,000 ft. was 165 rn.p.h., maximum sea-level speed 181m.p.h. and cruising range 850 miles.

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Aircraft of the 1914-18 War: The F.E.2b

Volume 18, Issue 01, 1956, Air Pictorial

Jack M Bruce

COMPANION Fokker-beater to the D.H.2 was the Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2b. Like the D.H.2, it was not specifically -designed as a counter-measure to the Fokker monoplane. In fact, the basic design of the F.E. had been completed in August 1913 under the designation F.E.2a. It was not, however, derived from either of the two different aircraft which had been built under the name F.E.2; it shared with them only the pusher configuration.

The F.E.2a was not ordered until August 1914, when a production batch of twelve machines was put in hand. The aircraft was a three-bay pusher biplane powered by a l00-h.p. Green engine. The outer portions of the wings were identical to the main planes of the B.E.2c, as it was hoped that this interchangeability of components would facilitate maintenance in the field . The F.E.2a had the cumbersome oleo undercarriage which had been developed at Farnborough.

The first F.E.2a appeared in January 1915, but on test the Green engine proved to...

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MACH 2 FIGHTERS ...The possibilities and the problems

Volume 18, Issue 01, 1956, Air Pictorial

James Hay Stevens

DURING the past year a new concept has filtered through the veil of security, the Mach 2 aeroplane-or more specifically the Mach 2 fighter. It was, perhaps, obvious that this would be the next step in man's ambition, but more than one eminent authority has expressed the view that it is somewhat prema ture. After a ll , however glibly the term may be used by scientists and politicians, Mach 2 is twice the speed of our present fighters. It is entering the zone of thermal troubles when the Mach 1 vehicle is still far from having reached the complete solution of its own problems.

One only has to look at the variety of designs offered as transonic and low supersonic fighters to realise that designers are still groping, if not in the dark. at least in the shadows. If further evidence is needed that we are still only on the threshold of supersonic knowledge, one can look at the extensive modifications made to almost every high-speed aeroplane. The Americans are well ahead with...

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Convair's B-58 Hustler

Volume 19, Issue 02, 1957, Air Pictorial

Roy Cross

POSSIBLY the most advanced and or iginal service- type aeroplane flying today, the B-58 Hust ler carries to the ultimate the trend of festoo ning (usua lly the  smaller)  military mach ines with external stores and bulges to increase operation load and versa tility. But previously large machines. especially bombers, have had their mai n loads stowed within the airframe for the obvious  reasons of decreasing drag and thus obtaining maximum performance. The Hustler carries its military load in what amounts to a meticulously streamlined  and a rea rule-conforming ex ternal bomb bay.

The idea of an external streamlined bomb container dates back at least as far as the pre-war Vickers Wellesley, for which it was adopted because of the  difficulty of cutting bom b doors in the spec ial goedetic structure. In the case of the Hustler the requirement for Mach 1.5-plus speeds and extreme adaptability for varying loads and missions caused Convair to bring up to date an old idea and...

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Aircraft Engineering Corporation Ace (1919)

Volume 18, Issue 12, 1956, Air Pictorial

THIRTY-FIVE YEARS is a long time between flights-yet this is exactly what happened in the case of the single-seat Ace, of which eight were built during 1919-20.
According to the rebuilder, Mr. Lowery, this sole surviving Ace was last flown on 20th January 1920 before it went into storage for more than three decades.

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Sweden's 'Lance'

Volume 18, Issue 12, 1956, Air Pictorial

Roy Cross

IN a recent Royal Aeronautical Society lecture Air Commodore Banks placed Sweden ahead of this country in quality of air force equipment. Doubtless he had in mind the Draken and Lansen fighters built by SA AB, and particularly the  comparatively short development ,pan for the Lansen of just under four years  between the prototype's flight nd the machine's entry into service. It will be remembered, too, that SAAB's earlier J 29 was the first West European swept-wing fighter to reach the squadrons.
Such results arc achieved mainly by concentrating the bulk of Sweden's limited technical and economic resources on bringing one main military type into production every three to four years. Only a small proportion of the closely integrated aircraft research potential is spared for long-term basic study, the main work being concentrated on Sweden's immediate future requirements in air defence.

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The Blackburn B.20

Volume 19, Issue 08, 1957, Air Pictorial

WITH the outbreak of World War II a number of
interesting aircraft projects had to be abandoned
as wartime demands absorbed all available design and
factory capacity. One of these projects was the Blackbum
B.20 flying-boat, a unique aircraft in that it had
a retractable planing bottom to its hull.
Design and construction of the B.20 had been progressing for several years before the war and it first flew early in 1940. The retractable planing bottom hull,  or pontoon, on a flying-boat was the outcome of several years ' research by  Major J. D . Rennie, designer of the B.20.
One of the problems which designers of medium-size seaplanes have to face is the provision of sufficient clearance for the propellers above water, and a second difficulty is the conflicting requirements for angles of incidence and correct  streamlining between the conditions of take-off and level flight.
A large angle of incidence is required for take-off, but a...

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The English Electric P1.B

Volume 19, Issue 08, 1957, Air Pictorial

Roy Cross

EXTENSIVE fuselage alterations distinguish the first P.IB from the two P. IA prototypes. The front fuselage has received a considerable facial uplift, its main new feature judging from unofficial publ ished material being a straightforward annular intake- still probably lipped over slightly as on the P.IA-with a central shock-wave cone..."

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FRANCE'S BID FOR VERTICAL MACH ONE PLUS

Volume 18, Issue 04, 1956, Air Pictorial

French military aircraft designers are taking bold steps to evolve a new breed of single-seat interceptors with two targets in view: (I) vertical climb at Mach 1.0 to altitudes of 60,000 ft., and (2) "1,000 m.p.h. plus" or Mach 2.0 performance in level and sustained flight. Air Pictoral offers readers the first opportunity to examine two of France's newest entries in the race towards the Mach 2.0 interceptor fighter. The two radical designs are diametrically opposed in concept and shape-canard-delta versus straight wing, Griffon v. Trident

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Israel's Kfir-C2

Volume 39, Issue 09, 1977, Air Pictorial

Maurice Allward

Design Profile No.37
THE ISRAELI-Arab war of 1967, popularly  referred to as the "Six Day War", created reverberations the eddies of which have not yet subsided.
One of the most immediate effects of  those six fateful days, and one which must have caused anguish in victorious Israel, was an embargo by the French Government on the delivery of a large number of Dassault Mirage 5 groundattack aircraft which had been ordered the previous year. They were intended to  complement the Mirage IllCJs already in service with the Israeli Air Force, deliveries  of which had started in 1962  (the suffix " J" indicates the version of the IIIC exported to Israel.
These early Mirage IllCJs were designed primarily for the interception and air-combat roles, and were equipped with a Cyrano-Ibis fire control radar which could be used with semi-active air-to-air missiles such as the Matra R530,  which entered service with the I.A.F. during the 1960s.
The Mirage IIICJ was...

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Desmond Norman's Firecracker

Volume 39, Issue 08, 1977, Air Pictorial

Maurice Allward

Design Profile No.36
"IN THESE days of advanced technology and high development costs it has been said that the days of the "back-room inventor" have gone. All future technical innovations will emanate only from the research departments of the big  "multinational" companies with access to international funds.
There is a great deal of truth in this supposition, in engineering generally and aviation particularly, the latter tending to be among the foremost of advanced technology and near the top regarding research and development costs.
In view of the foregoing it was thus a surprise to see at the 1977 Paris Air  Show a new aircraft, from a new company with resources obviously much less than th'ose .of a " multi-national". The aircraft in question is the NDN-1 Firecracker, the latest brainchild of Desmond Norman, ex de Havilland apprentice and co-founder of BrittenNorman Ltd., who were responsible for Britain's most successful post-war light twin-engined transport...

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Britten Sheriff

Volume 39, Issue 07, 1977, Air Pictorial

First details of a new British light twin

"JOHN BRITTEN, co-founder of BrittenNorman, the firm that designed and built the Islander, Britain's largest selling civil aircraft since the war, has designed a new aircraft-the Sheriff. A year ago John Britten resigned from the board of Fairey who had purchased BrittenNorman in 1972 so that he could concentrate on design rather than manufacture.

It became apparent that there was a neglected market for an economical twin-engine trainer. At present training is generally done in expensive executivetype aircraft-the only ones availableresulting in wasted fuel carrying empty seats, thus adding as much as 50 per cent to the cost of training.

Using the smallest Lycoming engines to keep fuel costs to the minimum, the Sheriff was therefore designed primarily as a two-seat trainer, although with only the addition of constant-speed propellers and two extra seats it becomes an ideal family runabout or economical air taxi...

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Poland's PZL-106A Kruk

Volume 39, Issue 07, 1977, Air Pictorial

Maurice Allward

Design Profile No.35

WHETHER THE development of aviation has been a boon or curse for mankind can be the subject of lively debate. But there is one field where both sides agree that this particular technology has been of overwhelming benefit-agriculture, involving the use of aircraft to spray growing crops with fertilisers, weedkillers and insecticides. Spraying from aircraft is quick and efficient, as an economical and uniform spread of the chemicals can be obtained. Growing crops are not damaged as they can be by ground vehicles or people and equipment.

Aerial spraying is, however, a more exacting task than might be assumed. The pilot has to fly at a very precise height in order to ensure that the correct dosage of chemical is applied, and he must fly accurate patterns over the ground being treated; if he overlaps, the dosage applied may be dangerously
high, if he misses a "row" a dormant disease may thrive and infect the treated areas.

In hilly...

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Ptale of the Pterodactyls - 1

Volume 35, Issue 06, 1973, Air Pictorial

Peter Lewis

ONE HUNDRED AND ninety-five million years is a very long time, but aeons  after the airborne lizards of the Triassic period had glided above the quiet earth,  Pterodactyls were destined to reappear, for a decade, in vastly different  circumstances. These 20thcentury  Pterodactyls were man-made machines,  equipped with wings of nearly twice the maximum spread of their predecessors, but in conception were notably close to the original Pterosaurs. They owed their  revival to the ingenuity and zeal of one man, a designer and pilot who detected in  he ages-old form of the Pterodactyl (a name derived from Greek, meaning  "winged finger") the key to solving the problem of increasing safety in flying-a  challenge which had intrigued him for some five years.
Geoffrey Terence Roland Hill was born  in 1895 at Parliament Hill Fields,  London,  the younger son of Dr. Micaiah John Muller Hill, Professor of Mathematics at University College, London, and his wife Minna. Pursuit of  science...

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Hawker Siddeley Coastguarder

Volume 38, Issue 10, 1976, Air Pictorial

Maurice Allward

Design Profile No.77
CURRENCY is not the only world commodity inflicted with inflation. Increasing at a fast rate is the extent of claimed territorial waters adjacent to some countries .
The star example is Iceland. With her traditional 4-mile limit, her territorial waters covered approximately 3,000 square miles. The extension to 12 miles increased the area to over 11,000 square miles. The further extension of the  limit to 50 miles encompassed nearly 40,000 square miles- an area equal to  the mainland itself. The currenlly cla imed limit of 200 miles extends the coverage to over a quarter of a mill ion square miles, or six times the area of the mainland itself!
Another country with a large area of claimed territorial waters is Chile. Extending 200 miles into the Pacific Ocean, these cover about 200,000 square miles, or something like two-thirds of the mainland area. 11 must be evident that the effective patrolling and policing of such vast areas of water...

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Cranfield Chase

Volume 39, Issue 01, 1977, Air Pictorial

Maurice Allward

BRITAIN'S EXPERTISE in the field of large aircraft, both civil and military. is well known. In the field of light general aviation aircraft. however. the countrys products are nowadays generally conspicuous by their absence. This is a st range twist to our fortunes, particularly to those who can remember the 1920s and 1930s when de Havilland were saltIng the world with light aircraft.
It is thus with special pleasure that we devote this "Design Profile" to a new light aircraft being developed in Britain -the Cranfield Chase. formerly known as the A1 until it was officially named last November. The aircraft is also of some histoTlcal significance. as it is the first aeroplane In Britain to be produced specriically for competition aerobatics .
Cranfield is, of course. famous for turning out men, rather than new aircraft, and the story of how the famous Institute of Technology came to produce the Chase is unusual, and long.
The story starts in 1968 when members of...

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Mikoyan MiG-25 "Foxbat"

Volume 39, Issue 02, 1977, Air Pictorial

Maurice Allward

Design Profile 31

FOR THE last decade, if one had asked any agent of Western Intelligence which piece of Soviet hardware he would most like to study in detail, there is little doubt that high on the list, if not at the very top, would have been the MiG-25. This fast high-flying fighter has intrigued defence chiefs for twelve years, ever since the day in 1965 when TASS, the official Soviet news agency, announced that a twin-engined aircraft, designated E-266 and flown by Alexander Fedotov, had set up a new 1,000-km. closed-circuit speed record of no less than 1,441.5 m.p.h., carrying a 2,000-kg. payload.

Two years later, on 5th October 1967, the same pilot took the E-266 up to 98,349 ft. to set new payload-to-height records for both 1,000-kg. and 2,000-kg. payloads. The performance of this remarkable aircraft was further demonstrated the same day when it set up a new speed record of 1,852.61 m.p.h. over a 500-km. closed circuit. Three weeks later it raised the 1,000-km...

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The Hart Family - Part 1 - Parent of a long lineage

Volume 39, Issue 04, 1977, Air Pictorial

J Gordon Holmes

A GROUP of aircraft which has never received adequate tribute from aviation historians is that comprising the Hawker Harts and their offspring: Demon, Hardy, Audax. Hind, Osprey and Hector-more than 2.700 in number. They were designed and built as operational aircraft. Many of them did. in fact, fire their guns and drop bombs "in anger"and Britain came very close to going into a major European war  with a large number of R.A.F. squadrons equipped with them .
The Hart family played a vital part in Britain's defences on two counts. First, the large-scale production of those graceful biplanes in the early 1930s, when the economic situation in this country was at its worst, enabled the British aircraft industry to keep alive and, indeed, to invest in some up-to-date production  machinery. Thousands of skilled workers (who might otherwise have sought employment elsewhere) were retained, and were available for the Expansion years.
The second contribution made by the Hawker...

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The Republic XP-47J

Volume 23, Issue 10, 1961, Air Pictorial

Ray Wagner

"FASTEST PROPELLER-DRIVEN PLANE flown during World War II , Republic' s XP-47J was a successful lightweight version of the famous Thunderbolt.
Even before the standard Thunderbolts were used in battle , it was evident that the sturdy fighter was definitely on the heavy side, and improved performance could be gained from a better powerplant and elimination of excess weight. Republic proposed, at a Wright Field conference, and November 1942, installing an improved  engine with water injection, fan cooling, new propeller and supercharger, and reducing armament, fuel , and radio provisions.
The new design was designated P-47J..."

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Piper Aztec

Volume 23, Issue 12, 1961, Air Pictorial

GJ Christopher Paul

"TO QUITE a lot of people the tint sight of a Piper Aztec in England was at Shackleton's weekend at Kidlington in 1960, when the picture at the top of this page was taken. It shows G-APVX being demonstrated at full load by Wing Commander Tim Vigors. The particular significance of this picture is th at the aircraft is only about 400 yards from the start of its take-off run;yet one engine , which was " failed" for demonstration just as the Aztec left the ground, is already fully feathered and has stopped tuming, and the aircraft is about to climb away on one..."

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The Vickers Vimy-Commercial

Volume 20, Issue 02, 1958, Air Pictorial

Peter W Brooks

"THE Vickers Vimy-Commercial "City of London", G-EASI, owned by S. Instone and Co. Ltd., was perhaps the best-known airliner on the cross-Channel routes in the early years of a ir transport after the First World War. However, as a type the Vimy-Commercial is surprisingly little known-particularly in view of the fact that it was developed from the famous Vimy bomber, which made so many of the great pioneering long-distance nights, and that it sired a line of aeroplanes (Vemon, Victoria and Valentia) which provided the R .A.F. overseas with almost all its air "transport potential between the wars.

Designed by the late R. K . Pierson, then newly appointed chief designer of the Vickers Aviation Department, the Vimy-Commercial was historically a most significant step between the bombers of the First World War and the airliners of the 1920s. In this respect, it had much in common with the Vickers Viking of more recent times which was also to be designed by Pierson a quarter of...

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The Saab J-35

Volume 20, Issue 02, 1958, Air Pictorial

Roy Cross

"DESIGNED to meet a Royal Swedish Air Force requirement first outlined in 1949, the Saab-35 stems from a proposal for a fighter with a plain low aspect-ratio delta layout. Correct location of the C.G. would have resulted in too long a nose and excessive weight, however, and so the unique " broken" or double delta wing was used..."

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Consolidated-Vultee Model 111

Volume 20, Issue 08, 1958, Air Pictorial

Warren M Bodie

"Probably the most unusual airplane to ever appear from the sprawling factory buildings adjoining Lindbergh Field, the Consolidated-Vultee Model III also must be classed among  the most mysterious of aircraft. Virtually no information can be extracted from official sources, so the few people associated with the project hold the key to its secrets. One thing is certain. This was to be a post-war bid for the "airplane-in-every- garage" dream that permeated the minds of men suffering from war-inspired deprivation..."

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The Lockheed Starfighter

Volume 20, Issue 08, 1958, Air Pictorial

Heumann GW

Perhaps one of the most controversial combat aircraft ever to enter service and without a doubt one of the most significant, the radical Lockheed Starfighter is the first aeroplane in the history of aviation to gain world records for both absolute speed and altitude; a unique feat all the more remarkable for the fact that it was achieved by a standard operational aircraft in full service. The concrete evidence of the Starfighter's performance capabilities now provided by these officially observed flights has confounded this fantastic warplane's numerous critics, who regarded the claims made by its manufacturer as merely the outpourings of another highly pUblicity - minded American public relations department.

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The Breguet 940 Integral

Volume 20, Issue 08, 1958, Air Pictorial

"At 6.30 p.m. on 21st May, the Breguet 940 Integral STOL research aircraft took off on its maiden flight and was the successful conclusion of a line of research that began in 1948.
The 940 is an experimental aircraft and has been developed to test the efficiency of the "blown wing", so-called because of the slipstream from the propellers passing back over the wing and increasing lift...

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The Auster Workmaster

Volume 20, Issue 08, 1958, Air Pictorial

A New British Agricultural Aircraft
 
"The Auster J /JU Workmaster is the latest of a line of agricultural aircraft to emerge from the company's Rearsby factory, and it is the heaviest and most powerful of the Auster high-wing monoplanes
First flown on 22nd February, the Workmaster was built to the specification evolved by Crop Culture, one of the largest operators of agricultural aircraft in Europe.  Fourteen aircraft have been ordered, nine by Crop Culture and five by the French aerial spraying company, Ardic. The Crop Culture machines will have the Brilten-Norman rotary atomiser equipment under each wingtip.
The first Workmaster drawings were issued to the Auster production shop on 1st January, and the first aircraft flew fifty-three days later..."

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The Piaggio P. 166

Volume 20, Issue 08, 1958, Air Pictorial

James Hay Stevens

An Italian Business Aeroplane
 
The family business of Piaggio & C. S.p.A. of Genoa has long been noted for original and attractive aeroplanes one recalls the P.9 hydrofoil Schneider racer of 1927, the double-slotted-flap P.32 bomber monoplane of 1935, the pressure cabin P.III of 1939 and the P.108, the only four-engined bomber used by the Regia Aeronautica. Production- wise, the Piaggio company built almost all of the famous CANT-Zappata three-engined float planes. Since the war, the aircraft factory at Finale Ligure on the Italian Riviera has been in production with the P.136-L amphibian and the P.148 and P.l49-D trainers. Three attractive aeroplanes and, as the writer can vouch, even more delightful to fly. In March a P.136-LI made an extensive demonstration tour in England, where it aroused much admiration (see Air Pictorial, May, p. 165)
The P.166 is a landplane development from' the P.136 in which the weight saved by deleting wingtip floats and planing...

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Middle Eastern MiGs

Volume 20, Issue 05, 1958, Air Pictorial

"Since the end of 1955 when the first MiG-15s for the Egyptian Air Force arrived in the Middle East aboard the freighter Stalingrad, the fighter progeny of designers Artem I. Mikoyan and Mikhail I. Gurevich have played no small part in the recurrent tensions of this turbulent area. Egypt's closest ally, Syria, was oot slow in following the Egyptian lead in obtaining MiG-15 fighters, but unfortunately for the Syrians the majority of their MiGs were destroyed alongside the Egyptian fighters at Abu Sueir, where Syrian pilots were undertaking conversion courses, during the Anglo-French air assault, only four escaping to Hama. As a replaeement for the MiG-15, the Syrians selected the very much more potent MiG-17, and on this page we
publish exclusively the first genuine photograph of a Syrian MiG-17-an afterburner-equipped Fresco-c.

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The Nord 3400

Volume 20, Issue 05, 1958, Air Pictorial

"The design of the Nord 3400 dates back to 1956, when the Nord-Aviation Company-then SCAN-first submitted the project of constructing a new observation and general utility aircraft for the Army Air Force to the French Air Ministry. The go-ahead was given and an order for a prototype placed on 11 th January 1957. The final mock-up was approved on 15th February the same year, and construction of the prototype begun on 1 st March. The prototype took to the air for the first time on 20th January 1958 from Melun-ViUaroche airfield, and was piloted by Andre Turcat. The Nord 3400 was built to approximately the same weights and dimensions as those types at present in service, but with a superior performance..."

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The F.E.8

Volume 20, Issue 05, 1958, Air Pictorial

Jack M Bruce

The F.E.8 was designed in May 1915 by Mr. J. Kenworthy, of the Royal Aircraft Factory. As with the contemporary D.H.2, lack of a machine-gun synchronising gear dictated the adoption of the pusher layout. The first prototype F.E.8 was completed in October 1915 and completed its initial trials satisfactorily. Unfortunately the aircraft crashed in November, and' a second had to be assembled from spare parts. This machine went to France for operational trials in December 1915 and was at once well reported on.

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The Curtiss XP-55 Ascender

Volume 20, Issue 01, 1958, Air Pictorial

"The XP-55 was developed at the St. Louis factory of the CurtissWright Airplane Division and was flown for the first time in July 1943, but it was not until April 1955 that details were released. The name Aseender was given to the aircraft because of its high angle and rapid rate of climb. It had many design peculiarities such as the location of the engine in the rear of the fuselage , a low, swept-back wing with fully-movable rudders near the tips of the wing, and an elevator at the extreme end of the nose..."

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The Martinsyde F.4 Buzzard

Volume 20, Issue 01, 1958, Air Pictorial

Jack M Bruce

THE Martinsyde F.4 could trace its design ancestry back to the Martinsyde R.G., a clean, single-seat fighter of late 1916 which in turn had been developed from the G.100/102....

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Fighter A to Z

Volume 51, Issue 4, 1996, Air International

Continuing the AIR International encyclopaedia of the world's fighter airc raft, this month covering the Yakovlev Yak-3, Yak-5 and Yak-7.

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Seaplane Jet Fighter

Volume 51, Issue 4, 1996, Air International

Michael JF Bowyer

MJF Bowyer charts the studies of jet fighter seaplanes carried out by MAEE and Saunders Roe.

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The Strange Shapes of Stealth - stealth technology

Volume 2, Issue 09, September 1989, Air Forces Monthly Magazine (AFM)

Don Richardson

Following the long-awaited unveiling of the F-117A and B-2, Don Richardson delves into the complex world of stealth technology.

SINCE ITS INCEPTION in the mid-1970s, stealth technology had ,enjoyed an extraordinary degree of security. Dr Donald Hicks, US Undersecretary of Defence for research and engineering told the magazine Armed Forces Journal International in 1986 that " If sensitive information on performance or
technical data were to find its way into the pubic domain", the consequences would serve. " All those involved with low observables must be committed and steadfast in their efforts not to let unauthorised release of information reduce lhe leverage inherent in those techniques." In May 1986, Intemational Defense Review quoted USAF Aeronautical Systems Division commander as saying thai "We find with stealth technology that the longer you can protect it, the longer you can prevent someone from developing defences. The very shape of the aircraft is important...

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SEPECAT Jaguar

Volume 53, Issue 5, 1997, Air International

Jon Lake

Jon Lake concludes his two-part feature on the upgrades that have given the Jaguar a new lease of life.

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Jet Airliner A to Z

Volume 53, Issue 5, 1997, Air International

Bill Gunston , Gordon Swanborough , Jon Lake

Continuing the AIR International encyclopaedia of the world's jet airliners, compiled oy Bill Gunston, Jon Lake and Gordon Swanborough, this month covering the Airbus Industrie A300B4. A300-600 and A300-600ST Beluga

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Alligator supports Black Shark

Volume 53, Issue 1, 1997, Air International

Piotr Butowski

Russia's latest battlefield support helicopter, the Kamov Ka-52. analysed by Piotr Butowski

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AirData File

Volume 52, Issue 5, 1997, Air International

Technical data, photographs and general arrangement drawings of the Kawasaki OH-i and Tupolev Tu-334.

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SONIC CRUISER

Volume 63, Issue 1, 2002, Air International

Bradley Perrett

Bradley Perrett analyses Boeing's plans to develop a revolutionary aircraft intended to fill the niche for an affordable transonic airliner

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Eagle vs Flanker

Volume 58, Issue 4, 2000, Air International

Rene J Francillon

Rene Francillon reviews the development of this pair of superb fighters and highlights their strung points and their weaknesses

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Military Aircrew Training Part 2 - Fast-Jet Basic pilot Training

Volume 56, Issue 5, 1999, Air International

Bill Taylor

In the second of a series addressing military Flying training, Bill Taylor analyses the requirements for basic training and surveys the aircraft available

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Kamovs for the Navy

Volume 56, Issue 5, 1999, Air International

Piotr Butowski

Fifty years of Kamov's ship-borne rotorcraft, with particular emphasis on the Helix family, recounted by Piotr Butowski

"Although a steamengine engineer by profession. Nikolay Kamov (1902-1973) devoted himself to flying machines. Just after World War Two, he developed a small helicopter with two coaxial contra-rotating rotors . Called Ka-8 Irkutianin (named after his native town of Irkutsk ) it made its maiden night on November 12, 1947, with Mikhail Gurov at the controls. Tbe Ka-8 was demonstrated on Tushino airfield on July 25, 1948 - a day that marked the turning point in Kamov's professional career. After making three circuits of the airfield, the Ka-8 culminated its display by landing on the platform of a ZIS-5 truck. This was of particular interest to Navy commanders who saw a use for the small, agile helicopter on their ships..."

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Russian Revelations

Volume 49, Issue 2, 1995, Air International

Bill Gunston

Bill Gunston reveals of four aircraft he researched whilst creating The Osprey Encyclopaedia of Russian Aircraft 1875 - 1995; including one that emerged too late for inclusion in the book

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From Torpedo And Scout Bombers To Attack Aircraft

Volume 49, Issue 2, 1995, Air International

Rene J Francillon

In the first of a three-part feature Rtene J Francillon sheds light on the evolutionary process from three-seat torpedo bombers and two-seat scout bombers, to single-seat attack aircraft.
 
According to an aeronautical myth seeminly impossible to kill, the Douglas XBT2U-1 - the prototype of the legendary Skyraider - was designed over night in June 1944. Working late into the night in that fabled hotel room in Washington DC, Edward Heinemann and his colleagues did not generate the Skyraider design spontaneously. Rather,  they acted as midwives giving birth to a design conceived in EI Seg undo during the preceding year to meet new USN requirements for multi-r ole carrier bombers. In the first of a three-part art icle. Rene J Francillon sheds light on the evolutionary process from three seat torpedo-bombers and two -seat scout bombers to single-seat attack aircraft .

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Generation X - Boeing's New Babies

Volume 49, Issue 2, 1995, Air International

Paul Relman

Paul Relman explains how Boeing's 737 has been extended to meet current and future demands.
"Boelng's Baby 737 has now been in production for 28 years, during which a record 2,700 aircraft have been delivered . With the introduction of the first o f its three member ' next generation' 737-X family from October 1997, the jet has established itself as the a ll- time greatest modern airliner in sheer sales volume, Paul Relman explains how the family has been extended .
ON April 9, 1967, a podgy little jet airliner took to the air for the first time , the aircraft was the first Boeing 737 and the location was Renton near Seattle, Washington . The introduction of the aircraft , nick -named Fat Albert due to its rotund appearance, represented Boeing' s (rather late ) entry into the 'baby jet ' market...."

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Russia's Coastal Guardian

Volume 49, Issue 2, 1995, Air International

John Hayles

Since entering service over 30 years ago, the Beriev Be-12 has gained all the world records for its class and is likely to remain in service into the next millennium. John Hayles traces the history of this remarkable amphibian.
" Two previously unknown types of large flying-boat made their first appearance in the 1961 Sov iet Aviation Day flypast at Tushino Airport . Moscow. The swept wing, jet-powered. Beriev Be-10 was one of the stars of the show whilst another Beriev design , the turboprop engined BE-12, attracted little attention.
Widely assumed to be a simple conversion of the 1949 vintage Be-6, the BE- 12 was overlooked in many contemporary press reports .Not long after, however. the Soviet Naval Air Force chose the Be-12 to be the standard equipment of its coastal anti-submarine force , and the Be-10 was never to be seen in public again . Three decades on. the Be-12 is still in widespread service aro und Russia's coasts. and
has become renowned for its...

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The New Russian Trainers

Volume 49, Issue 5, 1995, Air International

Roy Braybrook

Roy Braybrook reviews the primary and ab initio trainers currently under development in Russia.

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FELINE CLAWS

Volume 49, Issue 5, 1995, Air International

David Baker

Dr David Baker traces the ancestry of the Grumman Tomcat.

"Despite the appearance of pretenders, the summit of US naval air superiority and perimeter defence is assuredly occupied for the next decade at leastby the Grumman F-14 Tomcat. In this review of technical upgrades since the early 1980s, Dr David Baker looks back at its prestigious pedigree and examines how the aircraft has fared through budget changes, evolving political uncertanty and the technical challenges of the last decade.

IT is now a quarter of a century since the Grumman F-14 Tomcat first flew. Chief Test Pilot Robert Smythe taking the prototype into the air from Calverton, New York, on December 21, 1970, for a night that lasted just nine minutes..."

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THE EXTINCT BISON

Volume 49, Issue 5, 1995, Air International

Bill Gunston , Yefim Gordon

In the second instalment of a three- part feature, Bill Gunston and Yefim Gordon describe the M-4.

THOUGH Myasishchyev's great strategic bomber had a troubled gestation, there was only one catastrophe. During 1953 there was a tremendou"s effort to save weight and this may have gone too far . At the end of the year the second prototype Article 25, which like the first had been taken by barge to LII Zhukovsky, began its flight programme with a test crew headed by B K Galitskii. On one of the first Flights the aircraft suddenly became a ball of fire and it crashed before any of the crew could eject. The subsequent investigation concluded that the root cause had been failure of a main fuel pipe, many of its supporting brackets having been removed to save weight..."

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FOKKER 70 ... FELLOWSHIP TOO

Volume 49, Issue 5, 1995, Air International

Paul Relman

Paul Relman charts the development of the Fokker 100's little brother, which entered revenue passenger service this year.

"The 79-seat Fokker 70 was created by 'shrinking' the Fokker 100 back to the size of the the F28 Fellowship from which the new family orininally evolved. Paul Relman describes the development of the 100' s little brother, which entered revenue passenger service earlier this year.

IN November 1965 German charter carrier LTU became the first customer for Fokker' s first jet airliner, the F28, with an order for one aircraft. Thirty years later, sales of the Fokker jets exceed 580, with over 520 aircraft having been delivered..."

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FROM TORPEDO AND SCOUT BOMBERS TO ATTACK AIRCRAFT - PART 2

Volume 49, Issue 3, 1995, Air International

Rene J Francillon

Three-part feature. Rene J Francillon details the development of the two-seat scout bombers that served during World War Two.

In part two of AIR International's study of the evolution of USN carrier bombers, Rene J Francillon details the development of two-seat scout bombers which served during World War Two and that of the final scout bombers ordered before America's entry in to the war , Last of these two-seaters, the Douglas XSB2D-1, was developed unsuccessfully into one of the first single-seat bomber-torpedo aircraft.

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AERO L-139

Volume 49, Issue 3, 1995, Air International

Roy Braybrook

Aero Vodochody has been responsible for more jet trainers than any other manufacturer in the world. Roy Braybrook describes its latest product.

"AERO Vodochody of the Czech Republic has been responsible for more jet trainers (approximately 60% of the total fleet of 10,000 such aircraft) than any other manufacturer in the world. The company was thus technically well qualified to bid for the USAF/USN Joint Primary Aircraft Training System. All it needed was an American engine and an American partner. Sadly. although a suitable US powerplant was available. Aero came to the party too late, when all the potential soul-mates were already spoken for. The little beauty that could have been the belle of the ball was thus destined to become a JPATS wallflower. Fortunately, in this particular social calendar there are other occasions where a determined and attractive lady may make her mark...."

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THE HUNTER TWO-SEATER

Volume 49, Issue 3, 1995, Air International

Roy Braybrook

Roy Braybrook reports on the two-seat development of Hawker's ultimate tighter.

"Developing a two-seat version of the ultimate Hawker fighter posed a difficult aerodynamic problem, yet the end- product was the finest weapons trainer of its generation. Roy Braybrook reports.

FOR very young readers whose concept of a fighter is a collaborative venture by a multiplicity of companies, and which spends years; on the ground while its black boxes are modified to a flyable standard, a background briefing may be in order. Prior to the British aircraft industry becoming nationalised in the 1960's the British fighter business was largely dominated by Hawker Aircraft Ltd of Kingston-upon-Thames. That organisation was technically led from the 1920's to the 1960s by the late Sir Sydney Camm, who was - in terms of the combined number and quality of his products - one of the greatest fighter designers that the world will ever see..."

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Image of Republic XF-91 Thunderceptor: Rocket figher (Air Force legends)

Republic XF-91 Thunderceptor: Rocket figher (Air Force legends)

Steve Pace

When post-war budget cuts ended many combat aircraft programs, the overriding importance of one of the most promising of these, known as Secret Project Number MX-809 (MX meaning Material, Experimental) kept it alive.

The MX-809 project was created in hope of fielding a very high speed, very high altitude daytime interceptor pursuit airplane capable of "meeting and defeating any strategic bomber aircraft that any potential adversary might produce." In other words, it was to be used for the sole purpose of defending U.S. airspace.

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Image of Sukhoi SU-24 (Russian Aircraft in Action)

Sukhoi SU-24 (Russian Aircraft in Action)

Yefim Gordon

As the need arose to replace the Yakovlev Yak-28 Brewer making up the backbone of the Soviet Air Force's tactical bomber fleet since 1960, the Sukhoi Design Bureau began development of a twinjet tactical bomber known in-house as the T-6. The first prototype (called T6-1) flew in June 1967, featuring delta wings and four lift-jets buried in the fuselage to improve field performance. However, the weight penalty imposed by the lift-jets was deemed unacceptable and the aircraft was radically reworked to feature variable-geometry wings, becoming the Soviet counterpart to the General Dynamics FB-111. The resulting T6-21 entered flight testing in May 1970, subsequently entering production and service as the Su-24. The bomber underwent a progressive refinement and development process, spawning dedicated reconnaissance and ECM variants. To this day, the Su-24 remains the principal Russian tactical bomber. Apart from deployment in East Germany and Poland in the Cold War days, the type has participated in "hot" conflicts as the Afgan War and the First Chechen War.

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From ATF to Lightning II - A Bolt in Anger: Part Two: Lockheeds YF-22A

Volume 48, Issue 1, 1995, Air International

David Baker

In the second of his two articles on the development of the Advanced Tactical Fighter, Dr David Baker describes the winning contender from Lockheed, unofficially named the Lightning II , and looks at its
performance.

"JUST two days after the YF-23A took to the air for the first time, on August 29, 1990, the second contender for the Advanced Technology Fighter programme was publicly unveiled . The Lockheed YF-22A was, a very different design to its competitor and visually more conservative. However, appearances belied the technology and the innovations it incorporated; Lockheed, and team-associates Boeing and General Dynamics, had taken a very different view about satisfying the requirement..."

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FIGHTER A TO Z

Volume 47, Issue 6, 1994, Air International

Continuing the AIR International encyclopaedia of the world's fighter aircraft, this month covering Thomas-Morse types MB-2, MB-3, MB-9, TM-23 and XV-13 Viper,

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AIRDATA FILE

Volume 47, Issue 6, 1994, Air International

Technical data , photographs and general arrangement
drawings of the SATIC A300-600ST Super Transporter, Tupolev Tu-414 and PBN BN2T-4S Defender 4000.

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EXPLORER - NOTAR COMES OF AGE

Volume 47, Issue 6, 1994, Air International

Robert F Dorr

Robert F Dorr details the McDonnell Douglas Explorer , which utilises the unique NOTAR system

"Until the advent of NOTAR, the only alternatives to noisy and potentially hazardous tail rotors, were fenestrons, jet rotors and multi rotor systems. Robert F Dorr describes the McDonnell Douglas Explorer light commercial helicopt er which features the unique NOTAR
anti-torque system.

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FIGHTER A TO Z

Volume 47, Issue 4, 1994, Air International

Continuing the AIR Intemational encyclopaedia of the World's fighter aircraft, this month covering the Supermarine Swift, Type 508 & 529 and Scimitar, and Svenaka Aero SA 14 Jaktfalk.

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ANATOMY OF AN AIRLINER PART 2 - SYSTEMS TO CERTIFICATION

Volume 47, Issue 4, 1994, Air International

Mike Hirst

In the second at a four-part feature describing the design and operation of airliners, Mike Hirst concludes the technical aspects wilh a look at certification, performance and operating costs.

"Aircraft flight control and electronic systems.

UP to the late 1980s (the advent of the A320 to be exact), all airliners had mechanical controls, and there had been a physical link between the aircrew's controls - stick and pedals - and the control surfaces (these are the elevators and rudder, already mentioned in conjunction with tail surfaces. and the ailerons on the wings). Other than a highly improbable catastrophic mechanical failure occurring, there had been no possibility of an aircrew losing control of their aircraft. By converting the primary link between the controls and the control surfaces from mechanical to electrical operation, the risk was introduced of an electrical failure, which is much the more difficult to anticipate and protect against, and this was the...

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LONGBOW DRAWN

Volume 47, Issue 4, 1994, Air International

Frank Colucci

A contender in the UK's Army Air Corps battlefield helicopter competition, the McDonnell Douglas Apache has achieved a Quantum leap in its operational capability with the addition of longbow radar as described by Frank Colucci.

"Combat proven in Desert Storm, the Apache has been significantly improved with the addition of a Longbow mast mounted radar & Hellfire missile capability, more powerful engines, and new avionics, as described by Frank Colucci . The AH -64D Longbow Apache is one of the contenders In the competition for a westland Lynx replacement for the British Arny Air Corps.

WHEN the McDonnell Douglas AH-64A first joined US Army field units in 1986, it opened up new battlefield possibilities with a deep-strike weapons system that could fly and fight at night. The modernised AH-64D Longbow Apache, expected to be operational in 1997, presents the military with even more potential...."

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FIGHTER A TO Z

Volume 47, Issue 2, 1994, Air International

Continuing the AIR International encyclopaedia of the
world's fighter air craft , this month covering Supermarine Spitfire floatplane to the Mk 24 variants.

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MYSTERY OF THE MYSTIC

Volume 47, Issue 2, 1994, Air International

Piotr Butowski

Piotr Butowski unveils the mystery surrounding the high-flying Myasishchev Mystic.

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LOCKHEED F-80 - A STAR IS BORN

Volume 47, Issue 2, 1994, Air International

Robert F Dorr

Robert F Dorr traces the evolution and service life of the Lockheed Shooting Star.

"ALMOST a month to the day after receiving an invitation from the US Army Air Force, on May 17. 1943, to come up with a fighter using the de Havilland-built Halford H-1B engine, Lockheed submitted
a proposal- and promised delivery within 18Odays! Thus, solely on the strength of Clarence L Kelly Johnson' s preliminary estimates, began the saga of the F·80(originally the P-80).

At that time jet aircraft were in their infancy; the Bell XP-59A Airacomet being the first American jet aircraft - flying at Muroc Dry Lake, Californ ia on October I, 1942 with Robe rt M Stanley at the controls. A mix of American airframe technology and British gas turbine knowledge, the XP-59A was followed by a small production batch of P-59s, tested by US Arny and Navy pilots..."

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FIGHTING FALCON V FULCRUM

Volume 47, Issue 2, 1994, Air International

Roy Braybrook

With increasing competition in the world's rapidly-shrinking fighter market, Roy Braybrook compares the F-16 and MiG-29.

"The Lockheed Fort Worth Company (LFWC) F-16 and the Mikoyan Design Bureau MiG-29, although somewhat different in size, are directly comparable in several important respects. Both were designed initially for air-to-air roles, as smaller complementary aircraft to relatively heavy fighters. Both are comparatively affordable, have been built in large numbers, and are now in use in many countries. Significant differences nonetheless remain, as explored in this analysis by Roy Braybrook.

COMBAT aircraft design might be summarised as applying the latest technologies to achieve advances in performance. respond to new threats, and eliminate the shortcomings of in-service types. while retaining their good points and making use of the lessons provided by recent operations. Whatever the minor discrepancies between the F-16 and MiG-29, some of the more...

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FIGHTER A TO Z

Volume 45, Issue 5, 1993, Air International

Continuing the AIR International encyclopaedia of the wonlds fighter aircraft, this month the subjects
span 42 years ; From the Spyker-Trompenburg
V.3 to sud-Est SE.530 Mistral.

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MIRAGE MIGHT HAVE BEENS 2: BALZAC DASSAULT'S FIRST VTOL VARIANT

Volume 45, Issue 5, 1993, Air International

John Fricker

In the second of an occasional series, John Fricker describes the composite power plant Balzac V.

"John Fricker describes the Dassault Balzac V in the second of an occasional series covering the large number of Dassault combat aircraft prototypes and projects which appeared in the 1960s - 1970s for national and NATO requirements. For various reasons these never reached the production stage, but their
prolifrration reflects one of the most fruitful periods in post world War Two aerospace technology development.

Potential for fixed-wing vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) performance was originally foreseen by Rolls -Royce Chief Scientist Dr A A Griffith in a classic paper on jet-lift potential to the Aeronautical Research Council back in 1941..."

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THE WORLD'S CARGO BUSINESS

Volume 45, Issue 5, 1993, Air International

Gunter Endres

In this survey, Gunter Endres begins with an overview of the operators and aircraft in the air freight market.

"THE carriage of cargo by air is big business, stimated to be worth some US$40 billion annually to the world's scheduled and charter airlines. The vast majority of freight is carried by passenger air lines in passenger aircraft, with exclusive cargo transportation in the minority and likely to remain so. Gunter Endres reviews the market and the existing and projected freighter aircraft...."

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Thunderscreech' - Republic's XF-84H turbo-fighter

Volume 48, December 1992, Air Enthusiast

Ed Davies

The supersonic blades of Republic's XF-84H turboprop fighter gave it the unofficial name of Thunderscreech. Ed Davies describes the type's brief career and the survival of the prototype.

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Fleet's Final Fling

Volume 48, December 1992, Air Enthusiast

Bill Cumming

Last product of Fleet Aircraft of Canada was the attractive-looking Model 80 Canuck. Bill Cumming describes its brief production history

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Latvia's Little Hawk

Volume 48, December 1992, Air Enthusiast

Chuck Davis

Chuck Davis describes and illustrates in superb detail the VEF Irbitis I-16 lightweight figther. Following the fast-changing fortunes of its homeland, the protoype was to wear not only Latvian but also Societ and finally Nazi markings

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Rival To The B-29

Volume 48, December 1992, Air Enthusiast

Alan F Crouchman

Most people will dismiss the Consolidated B-32 Dominator as a non-operational failure. Not so, Alan Crouchman revels that it did see action and brought down the last enemy aircraft of World War Two .

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A Tale of Two Tails

Volume 48, December 1992, Air Enthusiast

Daniel Ford

Keeping with the Shorts flavour, Daniel Ford describes the Short SB.5 pioneering the way for the English Electric's superb Lightning

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FIGHTER A TO Z

Volume 43, Issue 6, 1992, Air International

Continuing the AIR INTERNATIONAL encyclopaedia of the world's fighter aircraft, this month covering the Shenyang J -8 II , Short S .10 Gurnard and SIAI S .50, S .52, S .58 and S.67

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Yak-141

Volume 43, Issue 6, 1992, Air International

John Fricker

John Fricker takes a detailed look at Yakovlev's supersonic V/STOL fighter and assesses its somewhat doubtful future

"A SUPERSONIC successor to Yakovlev's Yak-38 Forger V/STOL naval fighter was first revealed by US intelligence as far back as early 1988 when an artist's impression of what was then thought to be the Yak-41 - codenarncd Freestyle by NATO appeared in the annual Pentagon publication "Soviet Military Power". Depicted on the deck of the then new 65,000 tonne Soviet carrier Tbilisi (later re-named Admiral of the Fleet Kuznetsov) and derived from satellite imagery of the Ramenskoye flight-test Centre where it was first identified as 'Ram T', the drawing of Freestyle proved to be remarkably accurate in general layout, although naturally lacking somewhat in detail, when preliminary information on the Yak- 141 was initially revealed by Russia at the 1991 Paris air show....."

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HOVERFLY - THE SIKORSKY R-4 STORY

Volume 43, Issue 6, 1992, Air International

Rene J Francillon

In this month's Warbirds feature, Rene Francillion looks at development of the Sikorsky R-4, the first operational helicopter to enter service in the US military.

First helicopter to reach operational status in US military service, to make a combat rescue, to be used in saving a civilian life, to operate from ship's decks, and to carry British and Canadian markings, the Sikorsky R-4 fell into oblivion after its withdrawl from use in 1947. Yet, among the more then 299,00 American aircraft built during World War Two for US and Allied Forces, the 133 R-4's procured between 1942 and 1945 certainly deserve a place of choice in the annals of aviaion. Rene Francillion details the story of this pioneering rotorcraft

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FIREFLY - SLINGSBY'S TRAINER HIT S THE BIG TIME

Volume 43, Issue 6, 1992, Air International

Barry Wheeler

The editor examines the development history of the increasingly successful Slingsby T-67, recent winner of the lucrative USAF EFS contract.

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THE AFRICAN CHEETAH

Volume 43, Issue 4, 1992, Air International

Mike Spick

Accompanied by the first detailed cutaway drawing of this Mirage III conversion by Atlas Aircraft, Mike Spick provides a detailed analysis of this hybrid combat aircraft which owes some of its background to the Israeli Kfir programme

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ROOIVALK - AN INDUSTRY COMES OF AGE

Volume 43, Issue 4, 1992, Air International

Ken Ellis

Ken Ellis reports from South Africa on the Republic's latest attack helicopter following an easing of security restrictions on armament development.

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Alpine Avenger

Volume 47, September 1992, Air Enthusiast

Peter Gunti

Starved of fighter markets during World War Two, the Swiss developed their own alternative, the D-3802/3 series. Peter Gunti shows how circumstances and time caught up with the breed and brought it to extinction

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THE IRON TIGER

Volume 40, Issue 6, 1991, Air International

Mike Spick

An aircrft that just failed to make a major mark in naval aviation history, the Grummnan F11F Tiger had a short operational life , but in its developed form couldd have proved a notable fighter. Mike Spick recounts the story...

In aviation terms, the 1950s was probably the most exciting decade ever. New and exotic shapes appeared in the skies seemingly on a daily basis: new records set, performance envelopes expanded, and many new discoveries made. One of the most important was the Area Rule, formulated in 1953 by Richard Whitcomb of NACA (as NASA then was). In essence this stated that for minimum drag at transonic or supersonic speeds, the cross-sectional area of a body should expand and
diminish in a completely even manner. The most obvious practical effect on aircrart design was that where the wings protruded, the fuselage narrowed, giving a distinctive waisted appearance . Area Rule was immediately applied to all new combat aircraft, in some cases retrospectively....

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TURBO FIRECAT : FIGHTING FLAMES WITH TURBINES

Volume 40, Issue 6, 1991, Air International

Robert Stitt

Firefighting conversions of the Grumman S-2 Tracker have proved successful for Canadian company Conair. Robert Stitt reviews the aircraft and the programme to date .

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B-36 CONVAIR'S - "BIG STICK "

Volume 39, Issue 4, 1990, Air International

Lindsay Peacock

Conceived during World War II, the mighty B-36 emerged as the last of the piston-engined strategic bombers for SAC, quickly to be rendered obsolete
by the advent of the jet engine. Lindsay Peacock recounts the story of the Peacemaker.

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SOPHISTICATION FROM SUKHOI

Volume 39, Issue 4, 1990, Air International

Roy Braybrook

Roy Braybrook reviews the work of the Sukhoi design bureau to put into perspectiv the design features of the Su-27 Flanker, which we illustrate with a detailed new cutaway drawing.

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FIGHTER A TO Z

Volume 36, Issue 5, 1989, Air International

Continuing the AIR INTERNATIONAL encyclopaedia of the world's fighter aircraft. from the North American P-51H Mustang to the North American F-86A Sabre.

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A CZECH COMMUTER DEBUTS

Volume 36, Issue 5, 1989, Air International

The LET 610 has entered flight test as a " big brother" to the L 410. As this account reports, the 40 -seat L 610 promises to find a ready market in the Soviet Union, where the L 410 already serves in considerable numbers.

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THE SHACKLETON: FOURTY YEARS ON - AND STILL SERVING

Volume 36, Issue 5, 1989, Air International

Chris Ashworth

Chris Ashworth provides an appreciation of the Avro/ Hawker Siddeley/ British Aerospace Shackleton and its service to the Royal Air Force, for more than half the
lifetime of the service itself.

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OSPREY: TILTING AT CONVENTION

Volume 36, Issue 5, 1989, Air International

The Bell/Boeing V-22 Osprey, now at the start of its flight test programme, breaks with convention to achieve V/STOL characteristics th rough tilting rotors. Our description is accompanied by a detailed
cutaway drawing.

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SB : THE RADICAL TUPOLEV

Volume 36, Issue 1, 1989, Air International

The first part of a "Warbird" feature in which we
describe, in hitherto unavailable detail, a significant Soviet bomber of the 'thirties.

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BOEING'S BABY BUSINESS GETS BIGGER

Volume 36, Issue 1, 1989, Air International

Entering service towards the end of 1988 and now to be seen operating in both North America and Europe, the Boeing 737-400 is one of the trio of variants that
allow the 737 to go on setting records for business at Boeing.

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Airdata File

Volume 35, Issue 6, 1988, Air International

Technical data, photographs and general arrangement drawings for the Canadair CL-2 15, Aero Dynamics Sparrow Hawk and Avtek 400

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STUDY IN ANGULAR UGLINESS

Volume 35, Issue 6, 1988, Air International

Searching for operational utility. France's pre-war aircraft designers often appeared to eschew elegance. Few aircraft exemplified the trend better than the Amiot 143 twin-engined bomber. subject of our "Warbird" account this month.

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MiG FULCRUM

Volume 35, Issue 6, 1988, Air International

John Fricker

From a close examination of the two MiG-29s at Farnborough '88, interviews with the pilots and design engineers and observation of the flying demonstrations. John Fricker provides the most complete analysis yet published, accompanied by an exclusive AIR INTERNATIONAL cutaway drawing.

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THE STILL SPRIGHTLY SEA SPRITE

Volume 34, Issue 2, 1988, Air International

The long-serving Kaman SH2F Seasprite, filling the US Navy LAMPS I slot as a light anti -submarine helicopter, is enjoying a new lease of life with the adoption of an upgraded configuration featuring
General Electric T700 turboshafts

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EXPANDING MARKETS FOR THE DASH 8

Volume 34, Issue 2, 1988, Air International

David Godfrey

With the Dash 8 Series 300 now in flight test, de Havilland Canada is busy consolidating its leading position in the regional airliner market. David Godfrey reports from Toronto

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Pacific Predator...the Aichi Type 99

Volume 33, Issue 6, 1987, Air International

The 'Warbird" series tis month describes the origins.
characteristics and operational use of the Aichi Type 99 Carrier Bomber (code-name Val), one of the key types used by the Japanese Imperial Navy to make its attack on Pearl Harbor .

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FIGHTER A TO Z

Volume 33, Issue 5, 1987, Air International

Conti nuing the AIR INTERNATIONAL encyclopaedia of the world's fig hter aircraft. from Morane-Saulnier Type L to Type AC (MaS 23)

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Mr Macs first Phantom - The story of the McDonnell FH-1

Volume 33, Issue 5, 1987, Air International

Only 60 examples of the McDonnell FH-1 naval jet fighter were built, but this first aircraft to bear the name Phantom clocked up an impressive number of "firsts", as this "Warbird" account relates

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AN AMBITIOUS "JACK OF ALL TRADES"

Volume 33, Issue 5, 1987, Air International

Gordon Swanborough , William Green

Sweden's aerospace industry has consistently developed, for the use of its own air force, combat aircraft that compare favourably wi th those of other
advanced industrial nations. How the JAS 39 Gripen matches up to an exacting requirement is assessed here by the editors.

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POLAND'S NOVEL TUITIONAL TRIO

Volume 32, Issue 5, 1987, Air International

From ab-initio to advanced, the military pilot training programme of the Polish Air Force is expected to be given a new look through the production of at least two of the new aircraft described here: the I-22, the Iskierka and the Turbo Orlik .

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Last of a Genus - Part 2

Volume 32, Issue 3, 1987, Air International

Completing, from last month, the "warbird" account of the Heinkel He 115.

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Image of Fleet Whales Skywarrior Pt.2 (Naval Fighters)

Fleet Whales Skywarrior Pt.2

Naval Fighters Bruce Cunningham

Volume two covers the operational use of the aircraft by the US Navy. This book covers the history of the squadrons, the special squadrons, and the men that flew the Whales.

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Image of Douglas A-4M Skyhawk (Naval Fighters)

Douglas A-4M Skyhawk

Naval Fighters Steve Ginter

The last version of the Skyhawk series to be built, the A-4M Skyhawk II, was obviously the most capable. While the original Skyhawks were designed as a lightweight delivery platform for nuclear weapons, the "Mighty Mikes" were refined into the ultimate close air support weapon to protect the "Mud Marines." With the Hughes Angie Rate bombing System installed it was arguably the world's best close air support jet aircraft ever built.

Ironically, the A-4M was the only Skyhawk version, other than the A-4A, to not see combat. The A-4M first entered service in 1971 as the Vietnam War was grinding to a halt and left front line service in February 1990 prior to the Gulf War. However, foreign versions of the A-4M did see combat in the Middle East. These were the Israeli A-4Ns and the Kuwaiti A-4Kus. Marine A-4Ms stayed forward-deployed in Japan throughout their active service life in readiness for a war that never was.

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Image of Douglas TBD-1 Devastator (Naval Fighters, Number seventy-one) (Consign)

Douglas TBD-1 Devastator (Naval Fighters, Number seventy-one)

Naval Fighters Steve Ginter

The US Navy first carrier-based monoplane was a torpedo bomber rather than a nimble fighter. It was also the first all-metal, high performance aircraft and the first aircraft with hydraulically folding wing.

This book takes you back to the early days of the Navy with a new weapon on the new and untried aircraft carriers when the Battle ship was king.

There are a lot of photos, drawing, cut away along with ship and squadron history.

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Image of Curtiss XBTC-2 Eggbeater (Naval Fighters)

Curtiss XBTC-2 Eggbeater

Naval Fighters Bob Kowalski

Curtiss Model 98 XBTC-2 was designed for a request for a single seat dive/torpedo bomber in 1942. A Wright R 3350 with a four bladed prop should power the -1, a P&W R-4360 with 3-bladed contra props the -2. Work on both variants was slow, to other commitments and stability problems were encountered during wind tunnel testing. The -2 was first flown on January 20th 1945, all work on the -1 was terminated since 1943. The crash of the first prototype in February 1947 and of the second in August 1947 ended the development.

March 1945, the Navy ordered 10 relatively minor derivatives of the XBTC-2. They had 2,500-horsepower Wright R-3350-4 engines turning single-rotation propellers. Progress was faster on this model, and the first flight was made in January 1946. Gross weight was 19,072 pounds, and max speed was 297 mph at sea level and 330 mph at 17,000 feet. Armament was two 20mm cannon, eight five-inch rockets and one 2,000-pound bomb or a torpedo.

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Image of Boeing XF8B-1 Five-In-One Fighter (Naval Fighters)

Boeing XF8B-1 Five-In-One Fighter (Naval Fighters)

Naval Fighters Rick Koehnen

The F/A 18 Hornet was not the first Naval Aircraft designed to meet all the Navy needs. The XF8B-1 was another Boeing called it the "Five-in-one" fighter (fighter, interceptor, dive bomber, torpedo or horizontal bomber). This aircraft had the ability of caring two 1600lb bombs in a internal weapons bay and two more on strong point under the wing or a pair of 2000lb torpedoes under the wing. Six 50 cal. machine gun in the wing or 20 mm cannons. It was powered by XR4360-10 Wasp Major with a contra-rotating propeller.

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Image of Bell XFL-1 Airabonita (Naval Fighters, 81)

Bell XFL-1 Airabonita (Naval Fighters, 81)

Naval Fighters Tommy H Thomason

The Bell XFL-1 Airabonita was a experimental shipboard interceptor aircraft developed for the US Navy. It was similar to and a parallel development of the land-based P-39 Airacobra, differing mainly in the use of a tail wheel undercarriage in place of the P-39's tricycle gear. It first flew on May 13, 1940. Only one prototype was manufactured BuNo 1588.

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Image of Curtiss XBT2C-1 Bomber/Torpedo Aircraft Prototype (Naval Fighters, number sixty-two)

Curtiss XBT2C-1 Bomber/Torpedo Aircraft Prototype

Naval Fighters Bob Kowalski

This is the fifth book in the series of World War II aircraft designed under the Navy's Bomber Torpedo requirements. The other books are Naval Fighters #24 Martin AM-1/1Q Mauler, #30 Douglas XSB2D/BTD-1 Destroyer, #36 Douglas XTB2D Skypirate and #48 Kaiser Fleetwings XBTK-1.

In the eyes of the editor, the Curtiss XBT2C-1 was an attractive aircraft in flight. But these good looks masked the true identity.

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Image of Vought TA-7C/EA-7L/A-7K Twosair (Naval Fighters)

Vought TA-7C/EA-7L/A-7K Twosair

Naval Fighters Steve Ginter

In 1972, Vought modified the first TF-41-powered A-7E (BuNo 156801) as a tandem, two-seat combat trainer demonstrator. The two-seater flew for the first time on August 19, 1972, piloted by John Konrad.

After demonstrating the two-seat Corsair II at various naval air stations, Vought was awarded a contract to modify 60 TF30-powered Corsair IIs (24 A-7Bs and 36 A-7Cs) into two-seat trainers, to be designated TA-7C. The first converted TA-7C flew for the the first time on December 17, 1976 and was delivered to the Navy on January 31, 1977. The TA-7Cs were delivered to VA-122 and to VA-174.

This book includes US Air National Guard A-7K Greek TA-7Hs, Portugese TA-7Ps, and Thai TA-7Es

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Image of Forgotten Bell HSL ASW Helicopter (Naval Fighters #70) (Consign)

Bell HSL ASW Helicopter (Naval Fighters #70)

Naval Fighters Tommy H Thomason

The Bell company won a Navy design competition in June 1950 for a helicopter specifically for anti-submarine warfare. This design, Bell Model 61, was the only Bell helicopter using the tandem-rotor layout ; it was powered by a 2400 hp Pratt & Whitney R-2800-50 engine and was intended to carry air-to-surface missiles such as the Fairchild Petrel, as well as dipping ASDIC. Three XHSL-1 were ordered the first of these flying on March 4, 1953, followed by a production contract for 78, including 18 destined for the Britain's Fleet Air Arm.

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Image of Douglas A-4E/F Skyhawk in Marine Service (Naval Fighters, Number Fifty-Two)

Douglas A-4E/F Skyhawk in Marine Service (Naval Fighters, Number Fifty-Two)

Naval Fighters Steve Ginter , Steven Albright

Douglas A-4 E/F Skyhawks in Marine Service is the companion volume to Naval Fighters Number Fifty-One. Douglas A-4 E/F Skyhawks In Navy Service. The Navy volume contains 41 pages of development, aircraft description details and drawings, as well as 19 pages of armament details and drawings that pertain to Marine
A-4E/Fs.

Although fewer Marine squadrons were equipped with the A-4 E/Fs than Navy squadrons, the type still saw extensive usage in Vietnam. The close air support that these aircraft provided to our deployed troops were invaluable and saved countless American lives.

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Image of Martin P4M-1/-1Q Mercator (Naval Fighters Series Vol 37)

Martin P4M-1/-1Q Mercator (Naval Fighters Series Vol 37)

Naval Fighters Steve Ginter

This book attempts to delineate the history of the Martin P4M Mercator. It is not by any means a complete narrative, due to the secret nature of the Mercator's career and its importance to the Cold War. Through mishaps and shoot-downs, the nineteen ship production run flew clandestine electronic intelligence missions against China, North Korea, Russia, and Vietnam until 1960. Many of the documents, drawings and photos used in this book were declassified for this publication as late as 6-17-96. Even so, I trust that all that acquires this book will thrill at the beauty and gracefulness of the big Martin.

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Image of Naval Fighters Number Thirty-Three XTBU-1 & TBY-2 Sea Wolf

Naval Fighters Number Thirty-Three XTBU-1 & TBY-2 Sea Wolf

Naval Fighters Steve Ginter

In 1939 with war on the horizon, the U.S. Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics sent the aviation industry a request for proposal for a new torpedo-bomber (VTB). The competition was won by Grumman with its XTBF-1 proposal. Known as the Avenger, two XTBF-1 prototypes were ordered in the spring of 1940. Vought also had a promising proposal and was awarded a contract for one XTBU-1 prototype.

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Image of Naval Fighters Number Thirty-Six Douglas XTB2D-1 Skypirate

Naval Fighters Number Thirty-Six Douglas XTB2D-1 Skypirate

Naval Fighters Bob Kowalski , Steve Ginter

Bob Kowalski continues the saga of the Bomber Torpedo (BT) program and the similar Scout Bomber (SB) program with the obscure story of the Douglas XTB2D-1 "SkyPirate". The story started in Naval Fighters #24, Martin AM-1/-1Q Mauler and continued with Naval Fighters #30, Douglas XSB2D-1 and BTC-1 "Destroyer".

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Image of Naval Fighters Number Forty-Eight : Kaiser Fleetwings XBTK-1

Naval Fighters Number Forty-Eight : Kaiser Fleetwings XBTK-1

Naval Fighters Bob Kowalski

The Kaiser Fleetwings XBTK-1 was initially designed to meet a 1943 Navy requirement for a "single-seat carrier based high performance dive bomber." As was the normal war-time practice, design studies were requested from companies without a major production model and, with the Navy's acceptance of the proposal from the Fleetwings company, the design was designated XBK-1.

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Image of Naval Fighters Number Thirty Douglas XSB2D-1 & BTD-1 Destroyer

Naval Fighters Number Thirty Douglas XSB2D-1 & BTD-1 Destroyer

Naval Fighters Bob Kowalski , Steve Ginter

Bob Kowalski continues the saga of the bomber Torpedo (BT) program and the similar Scout Bomber (SB) program with the obscure story of the Douglas XSB2D-1 and BTD-1 "Destroyer".

The United States was still at peace when the Navy issued a requirement for a design to serve with the fleet as both a successor to the SBD, which would be nearing obsolescence, and as a possible replacement for the SB2C, which was undergoing what can charitably be called a prolonged proportional development period. To meet this requirement, two prototypes of the SXB2D-1 were ordered by the Navy on 30 June 1941.

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Image of Martin P5M Marlin Patrol Seaplane(Consign) (Naval Fighters)

Martin P5M Marlin Patrol Seaplane

Naval Fighters Richard Hoffman , Steve Ginter

The lineage of Martin and the flying boat can be traced back to the PBM-4 of 1941. Navy's last flying boat and the end of a long era of seaplanes in the US Navy. This book covers the complete history of the Martin P5M Marlin aircraft development, construction, systems, squadron, interior, exterior weapons, and stores. It includes Marlin losses and casualties, photos of the catwalks, and some of the hazard of working on a seaplane over the water. There are also sections on the US Coast Guard and French use plus modelers guide.

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Image of Early Banshees F2H-1/2/2B/2N/2P (Consign) (Naval Fighters)

Early Banshees F2H-1/2/2B/2N/2P

Naval Fighters Steve Ginter

In 1980, I published the second book in the Naval Fighter Series, the McDonnell Banshee F2H-1, 2, 3 and 4. It was 78 pages with 95 photos and over 150 profiles. It was reprinted two times and has been out of print for more than 15 years this volume has replaced at least part of it. This volume covers F2H-1, F2H-2/2B/2N/2P Banshees. The F2H-3 and F2H-4 will be covered by a future volume.

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Image of Lockheed R6O/R6V Constitution (Naval Fighters)

Lockheed R6O/R6V Constitution (Naval Fighters)

Naval Fighters Steve Ginter

The Lockheed R6V Constitution was a large, propeller-driven, double-decker transport aircraft developed in the 1940s by Lockheed as a long-range, high capacity transport and airliner for the U.S. Navy.

The first time I saw this aircraft was in a photo of a Bearcat and it was in the back ground.

This book covers this and more.

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Image of McDonnell FH-1 Phantom (Naval Fighters Series No 3)

McDonnell Fh-1 Phantom (Naval Fighters Series No 3)

Naval Fighters Steve Ginter

The photos in this edition are black and white. First published in 1981, the book covers the Navy's first jet aircraft to operate from a carrier, the McDonnell FD-1/FH-1 Phantom. The underpowered twin jet fighter would prove, along with North American's FJ-1, the feasibility of operating jets from carriers. It was operated by VF-17A/VF-171, VF-172, VMF-122 and the "Flying Leathernecks" demonstration team as well as the reserves. 48 photos, 6 illustrations and 21 profiles are included.

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Image of Curtiss F9C Sparrowhawk Airship Fighters (Naval Fighters, 79)

Curtiss F9C Sparrowhawk Airship Fighters (Naval Fighters, 79)

Naval Fighters Richard Hoffman

The F9C was the first fighter specifically designed to be dropped from mother airships. The plane would be lowered in the air stream hanging from a trapeze below the airship. The pilot would release the hook mechanism and fly to defend its airship. It would be retrieved inside the airship by hooking again on the trapeze. The Air Force also tried this and it is covered in this book.

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Image of Grumman XF10F-1 Jaguar Swing-Wing (Consign) (Naval Fighters)

Grumman XF10F-1 Jaguar Swing-Wing (Consign) (Naval Fighters)

Naval Fighters Corwin Meyer

The unusual and innovative swing-wing Jaguar program ended up being a one airplane project even though during its development, orders were placed for one hundred and twelve aircraft. That ship, BuNo 124435, would only be flown by one pilot, Corwin "Corky" Meyer. When the program concluded in 1953 after over a year of flight testing, the flight test example 124435 along with the number two ship 124436, which was some 90% complete, were shipped to the Naval Air Material Center, Philadelphia, for use in testing barriers and barricades. The static test article, which was some 60% complete, was shipped to the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland for use as a target.

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S.79: The Hunchbacked Sparrow

Volume 27, Issue 1, 1984, Air International

The first of a two-part "Warbirds" feature in which we describe and illustrate the Savoia Marchetti three-engined bomber that had its baptism of fire in the spanish civil war nearly 50 years ago

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Sikorsky's Hawks

Volume 27, Issue 1, 1984, Air International

The family of helicopters derived from the original Sokorsky S-70 ITTAS contender continues to expand. This article reviews the variants from UH-60A to HH-60G, with special reference to the SH-60B Seahawk

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Fa223...Henrich Focke's Singular Kite

Volume 26, Issue 5, 1984, Air International

The first installment of a detailed and authorative account to the Focke Achgelis Fa 223 Drache, one of the first successful helicopters to enter production, and already operational when the war ended

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Hind - overpowering or overrated?

Volume 26, Issue 5, 1984, Air International

Possibly the most potent attack helicopter available to any air arm today is the Mil-24 Hind, the evolution and multiple variants of which are assessed here

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Indians from Arizona

Volume 26, Issue 5, 1984, Air International

Deliveries have recently begun of the Hughes AH-64 Apache from a brand-new assembly facility at Mesa, Arizona. The characteristics of this important new helicopter are described.

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The Wooden Wonder goes aboard - The de Havilland Sea Mosquito

Volume 26, Issue 6, 1984, Air International

Eric Brown

Capt Eric Brown continues his series on Naval Aircraft of the 'forties with an account of the development of the Sea Mosquito and his first deck landings in a twin-engined aircraft

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Aircraft design philosophy

Volume 26, Issue 4, 1984, Air International

Roy Braybrook

In the second of an ocasional series, Roy Braybrook reviews the work of Glenn Spacht in the application of forward swept wings

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Tigercat - Grumman's Feline Twin

Volume 26, Issue 4, 1984, Air International

Eric Brown

Capt Eric Brown continues his "Viewed from the Cockpit" series with a discussion of the characteristics of the twin-engined Grumman F7F Tigercat

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Fokker 50 for the Eighties

Volume 26, Issue 4, 1984, Air International

New engines and a substantial modernisation of structure, systems and cabin amenities are offered by Fokker in its recently-announced F27 development, as described in this article

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Super Puma

Volume 26, Issue 1, 1984, Air International

Paul Jackson

Paul Jackson describes with the help of a cutaway drawing and photographs the "Makila-powered mutli-form from Marignane" that continues the success story of the original Aerospatiale Puma

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Were the Wrights Right?

Volume 25, Issue 6, 1983, Air International

Burns BRA

Marking the 80th anniversary of the first successful manned, powered, controlled flight by the Wright Brothers in December 1903, B R A Burns studies the use of the canard layout first employed by the Wrights and the reasons for its recent resurrection

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Mustang - the willing warhorse - part 4

Volume 25, Issue 6, 1983, Air International

Completing our history of the North American P-51 in the "Warbirds" series, we describe the Cavalier conversions and bring the story up-to-date with details and a cutaway drawing of the Piper enforcer

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Commuter with a difference

Volume 25, Issue 6, 1983, Air International

Gordon Swanborough , William Green

The CASA-Nurtanio CN-235 is the fourth new twin-enginded commuterliner to fly this year, but as this article by the editors of Air International explains, it has some significant differences from its trio of compeditors

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Aeritalia - A growing force

Volume 25, Issue 4, 1983, Air International

Gordon Swanborough , William Green

The cornerstone of the Italian aerospace industry is provided by Aeritalia, previously independant companies, as this extensive account by the editors records

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Image of AH-64 Apache - Color Walk Around No. 52

AH-64 Apache - Color Walk Around No. 52

Walk around series Jonathan Bernstein

The AH-64 Apache, considered by many to be the world?s premiere armed helicopter, has been in service with the US Army for more than 2 decades. Designed principally as an antitank helicopter to combat large Soviet armored formations invading Western Europe, the Apache has had a major renaissance in recent years. Its stunning victories over Iraqi armor during Operation Desert Storm gave the Apache a well-deserved reputation as a tank killer second only to the A-10 in lethality. Yet again, in the mountains of Afghanistan, the Apache has returned to its roots, performing deep attack missions, convoy escort, and close combat attack in support of US troops on the ground, proving its versatility and effectiveness. A detailed look illustrated with more than 200 color photographs, color profiles and detailed line drawings. 80 pages.

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Image of Douglas SBD Dauntless - Walk Around No. 33

Douglas SBD Dauntless - Walk Around No. 33

Walk around series Richard S Dann

A highly detailed photo study of the WW II US dive bomber. Includes full color profiles, technical data, Black & White line art, over 100 color photos, and dozens of Black & White photos. Dann; 80 pgs.

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Image of OV-1 Mohawk - Walk Around No. 49

OV-1 Mohawk - Walk Around No. 49

Walk around series Ken Neubeck

OV-1 Mohawk All Color Walk Around. The Grumman OV-1 Mohawk was the first turboprop aircraft to enter into US Army service to fill the role of visual, photo and electronic reconnaissance. It was very unique in its design, and it never received the recognition for its accomplishments in over 40 years of service. Originally planned for both the Army and the Marines, the OV-1was used just by the Army, though NASA had a test aircraft for testing jet engine noise. Civilian users included the US Forest Service, the Environmental Protection Service and US Customs, which used the Mohawk to track drug traffic. The OV-1D aircraft from the 15th MI (military intelligence) and the 224th MI groups participated during Desert Storm, accruing over 5,500 flight hours with 2 planes lost. The Mohawk was retired from U.S. Army service in 1996. More than 150 photographs, line drawings, and 12 color profiles; 80 pages.

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Image of Consolidated PBY-5A Catalina - Walk Around No. 60

Consolidated PBY-5A Catalina - Walk Around No. 60

Walk around series David Doyle

The Consolidated PBY is the most readily recognized and widely produced flying boat design ever made. The aircraft, which came to be known as the Catalina, has it origins in Consolidated's 1932 Model 28. The US Navy began taking deliveries of the PBY-5A in October 1941 and then placed orders for over 600 more following Pearl Harbor. During WWII, PBYs conducted anti-submarine warfare, patrol bombing, convoy escort, search-and-rescue operations, and cargo transport. Some PBY-5As went to the US Army and others to US Allies - Australia, Britain, Canada and the Free French forces. This book presents a comprehensive view of the Catalina with 170 photographs, color profiles and detailed line drawings. 72 pages.

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Image of Lancaster Bomber - Walk Around No. 63

Lancaster Bomber - Walk Around No. 63

Walk around series Ron MacKay

The Avro Lancaster was unquestionably the finest all-around performer within RAF Bomber Command during the air war against Nazi Germany between 1942 and 1945. The Lancaster flew no fewer than 156,000 individual sorties and dropped more than 600,000 tons of explosives and incendiaries, playing a leading role in bringing Hitler's Reich to its knees. Known for its greenhouse cockpit, turret nose, twin tail, and 33-foot long bomb bay the Lancaster took part in Air Chief Marshall Harris's 'Operation Gomorrah' in July 1943, in which Germany's industrial center of Hamburg was devastated by round-the-clock bombing raids. In the thick of the air war, the Lancasters also paid a high price - 3,437 were lost in action. The work is enhanced by the fact that the author s uncle survived 36 operations as a bomb aimer aboard a Lancaster of No 49 Squadron. Illustrated with 200 photographs, plus color profiles and detailed line drawings. 80 pages.

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Image of Focke-Wulf Fw 190D - Walk Around No. 10

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D - Walk Around No. 10

Walk around series Malcolm Laing

The long nose Fw-190D was the liquid-cooled engine variant of the earlier Fw-190 series of Luftwaffe fighters. This volume gives a pilot's eye view of the Fw-190D covering details seldom seen in other publications. 80 pages, 40 in color, over 200 photos.

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Image of F-86 Sabre - Walk Around No. 21

F-86 Sabre - Walk Around No. 21

Larry Davis

With its origins in the closing months of WWII, the F-86 Sabre first entered service with the USAF in 1949. The F-86 saved the day after the opening of hostilities in Korea, where the US and her Allies found themseslves outmatched in the air by the North Korean MiG-15. During the Korean War, F-86s shot down 800 MiGs, compared to the loss of a mere 78 Sabres. This title shows an in-depth look at the F-86A, E, and F day fighters during the Korean War and beyond. Includes detailed coverage of engines, cockpits, landing gear, and weapons. Illustrated with 103 b/w and 83 color photos, 46 color drawings, 20 b/w line drawings. Davis; 80 pages.

29/12/1999

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Image of MiG-15 - Walk Around No. 40

MiG-15 - Walk Around No. 40

Walk around series Hans-Heiri Stapfer

The product of captured German wartime data, the Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 became famous as the adversary of the U.S. Air Force s F-86 in the skies over Korea. Over 15,000 of these swept-wing fighters were built in the USSR, Poland, and Czechoslovakia, serving in the air forces of the Soviet Union and its allies as well as being exported to other nations. More than 150 color and b&w photos, 12 color profiles, b&w line drawings, color covers. 80 pages,

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Image of Macchi C.205 Veltro - Color Series Walk Around No. 58

Macchi C.205 Veltro - Color Series Walk Around No. 58

Walk around series Hans-Heiri Stapfer

With Allied bombing raids increasing in 1942, Italy s High Command launched a competition for Serie 5 (5th series) fighters. Fitted with a German DB.605 engine, the sleek Macchi C.205s proved able to blast Spitfires out of the sky after they were introduced in November 1942. The addition of wing mounted 20mm in the spring of 1943 enabled the C.205 to take on American heavy bombers as well. Following the Itallian Armistice some C.205s turned their guns on Axis aircraft with success as well, even as Mussolini s loyalists continued to fly the plane in the colors of the German-backed 'Social Republic' in the north. The Germans themselves took advantage of the fighter, temporarily equipping an entire Gruppe of JG77. After the war, modified C.205s went on to serve the Royal Egyptian Air Force during its 1948 war with Israel. Get a close-up look at one of WWII s most aesthetically pleasing and innovative single-seat fighters! Illustrated with 225 photographs, color profiles, and detailed line drawings. 80 pages.

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MiG-21 Fishbed Part 1 - Walk Around No. 37

Walk around series Hans-Heiri Stapfer

Inside and out photo coverage of the MiG-21F-13 (Fishbed C) to the MiG-21 PFM (Fishbed F). Covers cockpits, landing gear, wheel wells, airframes, engines, and armament details. Also covers the two-seat flight & weapons' training variants. Over 200 full color and B&W photos, line drawings, 12 full color profiles and two cover paintings. Stapfer; 40 pages of color! 80 pages.

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Image of MiG-17 Fresco - Walk Around No. 46

MiG-17 Fresco - Walk Around No. 46

Walk around series Hans-Heiri Stapfer

The MiG-17 'Fresco' followed the MiG-15 'Fagot' into Soviet Air Force service and evolved into a highly maneuverable, reliable and easy-to-maintain air combat fighter. One of the most widely exported fighters of all time, the MiG-17 saw service in Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia, including combat in a number of air forces around the world. Every detail of this Cold War fighter aircraft is illustrated with over 200 color and b/w photos, line drawings and 12 color profiles; 80 pages.

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Image of F-84F Thunderstreak - Walk Around Color Series No. 59

F-84F Thunderstreak - Walk Around Color Series No. 59

Walk around series Ken Neubeck

The success of the F-86 Sabre prompted Republic to design its own swept-wing aircraft and the prototype of the Thunderstreak - designated the YF-96A - took to the skies in 1950. The F-84F could reach a top speed of 695 mph, and in March of 1955, the Thunderstreak set a transcontinental speed record by flying from Los Angeles to New York in just 3 hours and 33 minutes. On the basis of the F-84F design, a photo-reconnaissance version, known as the RF-84F Thunderflash, was also developed and placed into production in 1952. Program delays plagued the development of the F-84F, and active duty phaseout began almost as soon as it entered service in 1954. By 1958 the F-84F was relegated to the Air National Guard. The Thunderstreak did serve as NATO s front-line fighter-bomber during the 1950s, and France successfully sent F-84Fs into battle against Egypt during the 1956 Suez Canal Crisis. The F-84F remained in service with several European air forces for decades, with Greece only retiring its last Thunderstreak in 1984. Illustrated with more than 250 photographs, color art, and profiles; Neubeck; 80 pages.

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Image of F4U Corsair - Walk Around No. 65

F4U Corsair - Walk Around No. 65

Walk around series David Doyle

The F4U Corsair was arguably the best piston-engine carrier-borne fighter ever produced. Designed in 1938 and first flown in 1940, the Corsair remained in production until 1953, long after many of its contemporaries had been rendered obsolete. Three firms - Vought, Goodyear, and Brewster - manufactured the numerous versions and sub-variants of the Corsair. This book closely examines three of the most notable variants, the F4U-1D, -4, and -5, as well as selected sub-variants, through detailed color photographs of the most painstakingly restored examples existent. In addition to detailed line drawings and color profile illustrations, this volume is packed with over 200 photographs, including spectacular aerial shots and detailed photos of the legendary, inverted gull-wing fighter. 80 pages.

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Image of OH-58D Kiowa Warrior - Walk Around Color Series No. 50

OH-58D Kiowa Warrior - Walk Around Color Series No. 50

Walk around series Floyd S Werner

OH-58D Kiowa Warrior Walk Around Color Series. Werner. The OH-58D was Bell s answer to the U.S. Army s request for a digital platform to aid new artillery. Originally unarmed as part of the Army Helicopter Improvement Program, the OH-58D was based on the OH-58C. It was, however, a completely new helicopter, featuring a four-blade main rotor, a more powerful engine, a multifunction display, and a Mast Mounted Sight (MMS). The MMS was the basis for the upgrade, using a Television System, Thermal Imaging System, and Laser Rangefinder/Designator. The helicopter s success led to the decision to arm it with two hard points capable of holding either .50-caliber machine guns, seven-shot rocket pods, Air-to-Air Stingers, or Hellfire missiles. This book takes a detailed look at the Kiowa Warrior with more then 200 color photos, color profiles, and detailed line drawings; 80 pages.

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Image of UH-1 Huey Gunships - Walk Around No. 36

UH-1 Huey Gunships - Walk Around No. 36

Walk around series Wayne Mutza

Provides a highly detailed and informative inside-&-out look at the Vietnam era US helicopter. Contains full color profiles, B&W line art, technical data, color photos and dozens of B&W photos. 80 pages.

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Image of Bell AH-1 Cobra - Walk Around No. 29

Bell AH-1 Cobra - Walk Around No. 29

Walk around series Wayne Mutza

The US Army's premier attack helicopter from Vietnam to the 1980s is presented in meticulous detail. Also covers the US Marine Cobras. Includes cockpits, engines, rotors, weapons, and airframe details. 12 full color profiles, line drawings, and 40 pages of color. 80 pages.

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Image of B-29 Superfortress - Color Walk Around No. 54

B-29 Superfortress - Color Walk Around No. 54

Walk around series Dennis Savage

Equipped with pressurized cabins for high-altitude effectiveness, with an electronic fire-control system, and remote-controlled machine gun turrets, the B-29 Superfortress was the most advanced aircraft of WWII. Two of those planes, the Superfortresses Enola Gay and Bockscar, dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. Yet over all, the B-29 received less notoriety than its storied elder siblings, the B-17 and B-24, perhaps because its service areas - the China, Burma, and India Theater and the Western Pacific - were less publicized than was the war in Europe. Designed by Boeing, nearly 4,000 B-29s had been turned out by the time production ended in 1946. Yet today, only a few meticulously restored and preserved examples of the historic aircraft survive. A unique look at the plane that ushered in the nuclear age. Illustrated with over 210 photographs; 80 pages.

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Image of Boeing B-52 Stratofortress - Walk Around No. 6

Boeing B-52 Stratofortress - Walk Around No. 6

Walk around series Lou Drendel

The B-52 served as the primary bomber for SAC through the '50s, '60s, '70s, '80s and into the '90s. The B-52 saw combat in Vietnam & in the Persian Gulf. This volume gives a pilot's eye view of the Stratofortress covering details seldom seen in other publications. 80 pages, 40 in color, over 200 photos.

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Image of F-111 Aardvark - Walk Around Color Series No. 57

F-111 Aardvark - Walk Around Color Series No. 57

Walk around series Ken Neubeck

The F-111 Aardvark was the first production aircraft to feature a variable swept-wing. This aircraft s original design met 2 different mission roles for the US military. The Air Force needed a joint-service aircraft while the Navy needed a carrier-based aircraft. Among the construction proposals, General Dynamics won the contract to build the Air Force version that would become the F-111. Amidst much controversy during its early stages, the Aardvark developed into an indispensable aircraft. It served in Vietnam, Libya, and Operation Desert Storm. Currently, the Royal Australian Air Force continues to fly the C-model plane, and the aircraft has one of the best safety records in the Air Force inventory. Features 12 color profiles, 3-view illustration, line drawings, and over 200 color and 21 b/w photos. This book is a must-have for any aviation enthusiast. 80 pages.

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Image of F-100D/F Super Sabre - Walk Around No. 48

F-100D/F Super Sabre - Walk Around No. 48

Walk around series Lennart Lundh

F-100D/F Super Sabre Walk Around. North American's F-100 Super Sabre was the first of the famous Century Series fighters, and America's first capable of supersonic speed in level flight. During the Cold War, it stood as a guardian of freedom around the world. Capable of carrying nuclear weapons while operating from bases in the US, Pacific and Europe, it helped deter communist aggression. In Vietnam, Super Sabres shouldered the bulk of the attack role for many years provided a platform for high-speed forward Air Control, and pioneered the Wild Weasel concept before the F-105s and F4s took on the role. Under peaceful skis, performances by the USAF Skyblazers and Thunderbirds served to awe the crows and inspire future pilots. At the end of their service lives, more than 200 F-100s served as target drones, training the crews of later generations of fighters. More than 150 photographs, line drawings and 20 color profiles; 80 pages.

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Image of Douglas DC-3 Dakota: An insight into owning, flying, and maintaining the revolutionary American

Douglas DC-3 Dakota Owners' Workshop Manual: An insight into owning, flying, and maintaining the revolutionary American transport aircraft

Haynes owners workshop manual's Paul Blackah

The Douglas DC-3 Dakota revolutionized air transport in the 1930s and 1940s. Because of its lasting impact on the airline industry, and in particular the part it played in the World War II, the Dakota is widely regarded as one of the most significant transport aircraft ever built. Using the RAF Battle of Britain Memorial Flight’s ZA947 as its centerpiece, this Haynes Manual describes the Dakota’s rugged anatomy and examines its operation from the viewpoints of its owners, aircrew, and engineers.

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Image of MiG-3 Aces of World War 2 (Aircraft of the Aces)

MiG-1/3 Aces of World War 2 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Aircraft of the Aces Dmitriy khazanov

Created by ex-Polikarpov designers Ivanovic Mikoyan and Mikhail Gurevich, the MiG-1/3 family of fighters was built to satisfy a Soviet Air Force requirement for an advanced, fast, high altitude fighter. Entering service in the spring of 1941, the problematic MiG-1 had its handling problems rectified with the hasty production of the MiG-3 - the latter had its Mikulin engine moved further forward, increased outer wing dihedral and a strengthened fuselage. As of 22 June 1941, Air Force manoeuvre units in the five borderline military districts could field 917 MiG-3s. Many of these were destroyed on the ground when the Germans launched Operation Barbarossa. Nevertheless, enough examples survived to allow pilots such as Stepan Suprun (Twice Hero of the Soviet Union), Aleksandr Pokryshkin (Thrice Hero of the Soviet Union) and Lev Shestakov (Hero of the Soviet Union) to claim a number of victories on the type. Early successes by units such as 23rd and 28th IAPs resulted in 35 aerial victories being claimed by MiG-3 pilots in the first eight days of the Great Patriotic War. Other units enjoyed similar levels of success, with MiG-3-equipped 15 and 31st IAP proving themselves to be the most combat-ready fighter units on the Northwestern Front. By the end of 1941, a handful of pilots had 'made ace' flying the MiG-3, despite the Soviet air forces having taken a fearful beating at the hands of the Luftwaffe. In 1942 MiG pilots actively participated in the defence of Leningrad, Moscow, Odessa, Kiev and Sevastopol, with still more aviators becoming aces as the year progressed. Amongst them was Aleksandr Pokryshkin, the second-highest scoring Russian ace with 59 victories to his name. He claimed his first five kills while flying a MiG-3 with 55th IAP. Stalin terminated MiG-3 production in October 1941, although the fighter remained in frontline service in large numbers until mid-1942. Surviving examples continued to serve with national air defence regiments until 1943.

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Image of Bell/Boeing V-22 Osprey -Aerofax (Aerofax Series)

Bell/Boeing V-22 Osprey -Aerofax (Aerofax Series)

Aerofax Bill Norton

This joint Bell and Boeing project was established in 1982 in response to the Joint Services Advanced Vertical Lift Program covering a wide performance envelope and multiple tasks. The answer came in the form of the V-22 tilt-rotor, a concept tested earlier by Bell with their 1977 XV-15. The transport aircraft style fuselage of the V-22, able to carry 24 troops, is topped by a wing with a complex flap/aileron system and two swivelling pods housing Rolls-Royce turboshaft engines, each driving enormous three-bladed prop-rotors. The intention was that the USAF would receive the CV-22B for special missions work, the US Marine Corps the MV-22B assault transports and the US Navy the HV-22B CSAR/fleet logistics version, but the technologically challenging program has been set back by fatal accidents and an 18 month grounding while flight safety issues were addressed.However, it is set to recommence a restricted development program with the intention that the production aircraft will begin to be delivered at the end of 2003 and gain initial operating capability by 2005, making this comprehensive new book a timely in-depth coverage of the aircraft.

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Image of Wings of the Luftwaffe

Wings of the Luftwaffe

Eric Brown

During the first chaotic months after the fall of the Third Reich, the RAE sent test pilots throughout the British Zone of Occupation to collect examples of the Luftwaffe's standard aircraft and then ferry them to Farnborough. Captain Eric Brown was a pilot in this ferrying operation. Here Brown delivers a detailed assessment of the characteristics of these principal German aircraft: Fw200C; Heinkel He162; Junkers Ju87; Dornier Do217; Messerschmitt Me262, Bf109G, Bf110, Me163, and several others.

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Image of AVRO VULCAN: DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT: Origins, Experimental Prototypes and Weapon Systems

AVRO VULCAN: DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT: Origins, Experimental Prototypes and Weapon Systems

David Fildes

The Avro Vulcan was the last V Bomber to see active service in its primary role during the Falklands conflict. It is the most popular of the three and one aircraft has recently become airborne again after a long period of rejuvenation. It has always been a major attraction at air shows throughout the world, attracting crowds who delight in its unique delta-wing shape and amazing maneuverability.The book examines the origins of the design, the prototypes and experimental aircraft, and goes on to explain the modifications that were made to the last of the breed.A leading member of the Avro Historical Society, the author has discovered many photographs and experimental design plans in their archives which are here published for the first time.

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Image of Grumman Albatross: A History of the Legendary Seaplane (Schiffer military/aviation history)

Grumman Albatross: A History of the Legendary Seaplane (Schiffer military/aviation history)

Wayne Mutza

The Albatross was the premier fixed-wing rescue aircraft for the U.S. Air Force and Coast Guard. Its very colorful history begins in 1946 and spans nearly a quarter of a century, including service with twenty-two foreign nations. With a total of 466 built by Grumman, more than eighty examples still thrive on the civil register. The Albatross also saw extensive service in the Korean and Vietnam wars. The fascinating history of this unique aircraft is complemented by over 200 photographs including many in color showing the great variations in color schemes and markings.

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Image of McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom Manual 1958 Onwards (all marks): An Insight into Owning, Flying and Maintaining the Legendary Cold War Combat Jet (Owners' Workshop Manual)

McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom Manual: An Insight into Owning, Flying and Maintaining the USAF's Legendary Combat Jet (Owner's Workshop Manual)

Haynes owners workshop manual's Ian Black

First entering service in 1960 with the US military, the F-4 Phantom remained at the forefront of US air power throughout the 1970s and 1980s. It saw extensive action during the Vietnam War as the principal air superiority fighter for both the US Navy and Air Force, as well as in the ground-attack and reconnaissance roles. The F-4J, K and M also played key roles with the RAF and Royal Navy in the same period. Former RAF Phantom navigator Ian Black gives the F-4 the Haynes Manual treatment.

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Epsilon

Volume 32, Issue 1, 1987, Air International

Paul Jackson

Paul Jackson describes the "tractable trainer from Tarbes" - Aerospatiale's primary/basic trainer that is now settling down n service with the Armee de l'air

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Mikoyan Flogger

Volume 32, Issue 1, 1987, Air International

Continuing Air International's popular In service series, the editors take a penetrating new look at the widely-deployed MiG-23 and MiG-27, including the recently introduced Flogger-K

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Farnborough Airdata file

Volume 31, Issue 5, 1986, Air International

A specially enlarged section presents, in our regular style, details, photograpgs and three-view drawings of some of the newest aircraft featured at Farnborough International '86

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The frustrated Fokker

Volume 31, Issue 5, 1986, Air International

Bart van der Klaauw

Conceived as a heavy battleplane to intercept enemy bomber formations, the Fokker T V emerged in operattional guise as a medium bomber, to see brief and ineffective service with the Dutch air arm during 1940. Bart van der Klaauw reports on a little-known "Warbird"

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Mikoyan Fulcrum

Volume 31, Issue 5, 1986, Air International

Roy Braybrook

The unexpected appearance in Finland, earlier this year, of a sextet of MiG-29's, gave Western observers their first opportunity to see one of the new wave of Soviet warplances at close quarters. Roy Braybrook digests the new information here, continuing out "In Soviet Service" series

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Intruders and Prowlers

Volume 31, Issue 5, 1986, Air International

Robert F Dorr

As a design, the Grumman A-6 is now more than 30 years old, but as this account by Robert F Dorr shows, the A-6/EA-6 family is far from being outdated, and new variants continue in production

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Fighter A to Z

Volume 31, Issue 2, 1986, Air International

Continuing the Air International encyclopedia of the world's fighter aircraft, from Messerschmitt Me 309 to Me 263 (and addendum, Lockheed YP-24)

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Yakovlev Forger

Volume 31, Issue 2, 1986, Air International

Roy Braybrook

Continuing our "In Soviet Service" series, Roy Braybrook examines the sole Soviet combat aircraft with V/STOL capabilities, the Yak-38 naval interceptor and poses the question of its true status in Societ naval air power evolution

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Mitsubishi Ki-21

Volume 31, Issue 2, 1986, Air International

Entering operational use against China at the end of 1938, the Mitsubishi Ki-21 ("Sally") went on to become a stalwart of the Imperial Army Air Foce for much of World War II. Our Warbirds feature provides full details of this underrated bomber

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Palmdale and the bomber connection

Volume 31, Issue 2, 1986, Air International

Gordon Swanborough , William Green

To the north of Los Angeles, Paldale is the centre of sever advanced aerps[ace [rpduction and development activities, including manugacture of the remarable Rockwell B-1B, as seen recently by the editors

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Fighter A to Z

Volume 30, Issue 3, 1986, Air International

Continuing the Air International Encyclopedia of the world's fighter aircraft, from the McDonnell Doughlas F-4 (USAF) to F-18 Hornet

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Valmet's turbotrainer

Volume 30, Issue 3, 1986, Air International

Gordon Swanborough , William Green

The editors describe Finlands L-80TP turboprop trainer derived fom the L-70 Vinka, and attempt to assess its place in an overcrowded marketplace

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Sopwith Snipe...the RAF's first fighter

Volume 6, Issue 6, 1974, Air International

Jack M Bruce

Jack M Bruce concludes (from the April issue) his highly detailed account of the RAF's first fighter, the Sopwith Snipe, which, as this installment reveals, never fully lived up to the promise inherent in this design for a successor to the Camel

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Bandeirante - a Brazilian Breakthrough

Volume 6, Issue 6, 1974, Air International

Roberto Pereira de Andrade

THe most ambitious aircraft development and prodiction programme launched in Brazil to date, for the Bandeirante military and civil transport is rapidly gaining momentum. From Sao Paulo, Roberto Pereira de Andrade reports on the successful launching of this interesting aircraft, the order book for which has passed 100

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Sharper claws for the RAF

Volume 6, Issue 6, 1974, Air International

Paul Millett

Following the introduction of the Sepecat Jaguar into squadron service in France, the type has also now entered service in the UK with the Royal Air Force. This special illustrated feature marks the event, and includes a description of a typical Jaguar sortie from the pilot's point of view, contributed by BAC ciief test pilot Paul Millett

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Centaur - The final fling

Volume 6, Issue 5, 1974, Air International

The last Fiat fighter to reach combat status in World War II was also this company's best, the basic G.55 Centauro being probably the most formidable production fighter evilved by Italy's wartime aircraft industry. This feature in our "Warbirds" series tells the G.55 Story in detail

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Two decades of the "Twenty one"

Volume 6, Issue 5, 1974, Air International

Conceived just 20 years ago, the MiG-21 was one of the most successful combat aircraft of the 'sixties and is today the most widely-used fighter. Much new information about the latest MiG-21 variants is included in this specially-illustrated account of its evolution from 1955 to date

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More thunder for the USAF

Volume 6, Issue 5, 1974, Air International

Currently the subject of an evaluative fly-off against the Vought A-7D , the Fairchild A-10A has been designed to meet specific USAF requirements for a specialized close-support aircraft. The first detailed account of the A-10A, plus an exclusive cutaway frawing

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Last of the Sixty-Threes

Volume 25, Issue 2, 1983, Air International

The Potez 63.11 was among the most numerous of the aircraft available to the Armee de l'Air in 1940, and production for the Luftwaffe later brought the total built close to 1,000. The story of the 63.11 is told in our warbirds series

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Balkan Belligerent - the YuRom Close Support Fighter

Volume 25, Issue 2, 1983, Air International

Subject of joint development and production in Yugoslavia and Romainia, the Orao/IAR 93 close support fighter is only slowly reaching its planned potential. New details of the sinfle- and two-seat versions are presented in this article

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Team Lynx and the Westland 30

Volume 25, Issue 2, 1983, Air International

With the first examples of the Westland 30 now in commercial service, the company is pressing ahead with the uprated series 160 and Series 200. These and more distand improements planned for both the Westland 30 and the Lynx are described in this issue

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Dashing ahead in commuter liners

Volume 25, Issue 1, 1983, Air International

David Godfrey

One of the contenders for the fast-growing market for twin-turboprop commuter liners, the de Havilland Canada Dash 8 relies heavily upon the experience and reputation gained by the larger dash 7. David W H Godfery , PEng,CEng, MRAeS, AFAIAA describes the newcomer

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Siberian Halo...Mil's Mighty Mi-26

Volume 24, Issue 6, 1983, Air International

Still the world's largest helicopter, the Mil Mi-26 is making tis second appearance in public at the Paris Air Show this month. We publish an exclusive cutaway draing and a description of this mammoth aircraft with military as well as civil applications

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Die Giganten....Messerschmitts Monsters

Volume 24, Issue 5, 1983, Air International

Our Warbirds feature this month tells the story of the extraordinary six-engined Messerschmitt Me 323 transport and the giant glider from which it was evolved - a glider so large that it required three aircraft to tow in into the air !

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Mosquito Fighter Variants

Volume 24, Issue 2, 1983, Air International

The second installment of our "Warbirds" feature, in which we describe and illustrate the fighter variants of the Mosquito used by the RAF up to the end of World War II

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The Hercules in the RAF...the Falklands and Beyond

Volume 24, Issue 2, 1983, Air International

William Green

Operations in the South Atlantic imposed a heavy load on the RAF's transport force, and led to the rapid development and deployment of new versions of the Hercules, as fully described here for the first time

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The unrivalled Emily

Volume 24, Issue 4, 1983, Air International

Our "Warbirds" feature descibes the origins, features, and operational service of the Kawanishi H8K Type 2 flying board, known as the "Emily" to the allies during World War II and arguably the best of the large boats used in that conflict

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From VAX to ADDAX

Volume 24, Issue 4, 1983, Air International

Dave Williams

A lengthy period of gestation and continuous development in New Zealand of intriguing project designs for combat aircraft. Their originator, Dave Williams, discusses the philosophy of his design solutions...

Since the early months of 1982, references have been appearing int he internatinal aviation press to the project designs of a group of individuals in New Zealand. These designs emanate from the Aerospace Products Division of the IML Group and they are characterised by unusual configurations, with blending of the wing and front fuselage and location of the engine on or above the centre fuselage. The design group argued that its novel design, employing high EVU ( enclosed volume utilisation), was well suited to the agricultural role: but parallel studies of the CS (Combat sensitivity) of modern warplanes led to the somewhat unexpected conclusion that the same airframe could be the basis for developing a new STOL fighter. The military potential of the design work has since...

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Sea Hawk - Epitome of elegance

Volume 23, Issue 6, 1982, Air International

Eric Brown

Capt Eric "Winkle" Brown, continuing his series of "Viewed from the Cockput" articles about post-war Naval aircraft, describes his long love affair with the Hawker Sea Hawk

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The KC-10A - USAF's Newest Range Extender

Volume 23, Issue 6, 1982, Air International

Lindsay Peacock

A dozen KC-10A Extenders are now in service with the air refuelling squadrons of Strategic Air command, each having more than twice the capability of a Boeing KC-135A. Linsay Peacock telles the KC-10 story to date

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Dumbo and Seagull - Two types of variable incidence prototypes

Volume 23, Issue 5, 1982, Air International

Morgan EB , Burnet C , Charles Burnet , Eric Morgan

A pair of Supermarine designs of 30 years ago and more featureing variable wing incidence recalled in a detailed article by Charles Burnet and Eric Morgan based on personal experience as well as reasearch

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Sea Hornet Supreme

Volume 23, Issue 4, 1982, Air International

Eric Brown

Capt Eric Brown continues his series on flying post-war naval aircraft with a contribution on the de Havilland Sea Hornet, which he recalls as the best aeroplane he has ever flown

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A Veteran designers Thoughts on Fighters

Volume 23, Issue 4, 1982, Air International

Edward H Heinemann

Ed Heinemann is internationally recognised as having been one of the most consistently successful of US combat aircraft designers of the past half-century. His many progeny have included such redoubatable warplanes as the SBD Dauntless, Skyraider, the A3d Skywarrior, the A4D Skyhawk and the F4D Skyray which successively made their mark in military aviations annals. Ed Heinemann was never reluctand to innovate and most of his designs were characterised by robustness, fundamental simplicity, comparatively low cost and high performance. Indeed, it is his proud boast that their average weight was less than two-thirds of that of their competitors or that stipulated by the specification to which they were designed.
Before retiring in 1973, Ed Heinemann spent 10 years with General Dynamics, and the last aeroplane which he had influence was, therefore, the F-16 Fighting Falcon, although he hastens to give primary credit for this outstanding fighter to the Corporation's Fort Worth...

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A big lifter from Bell - Bell 214ST

Volume 23, Issue 4, 1982, Air International

The Bell 214ST, which entered service earlier this year, is the largest Bell commercial helicopter to date. Its origins and features are described in the article which includes a cutaway drawing

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Image of F-89 Scorpion - Walk Around No. 61

F-89 Scorpion - Walk Around No. 61

Walk around series Dennis M Savage

As the United States entered the Jet Age, the military sought a jet-propelled replacement for the P-61 Black Widow and F-82 Twin Mustang night fighters. After beating out tough competition from other US aircraft makers, Northop's F-89 stepped into the role as all-weather interceptor. Nicknamed the Scorpion because of its high, up-swept tail, the F-89 entered service in 1951 and served through 1969. Equipped with advanced radar for its time, the Scorpion guarded the Cold War skies over the northern frontiers of the United States, ready to confront Soviet circumpolar nuclear bomber attack, while earning the distinction of being the 1st combat aircraft armed with nuclear air-to-air weapons (Genie rockets). Illustrated with 200 photographs, plus color profiles and detailed line drawings. 60 pages.

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Image of Remembering An Unsung Giant - The Douglas C-133 Cargomaster and Its People

Remembering An Unsung Giant - The Douglas C-133 Cargomaster and Its People

Cal Taylor

A detailed description of the Douglas C-133 Cargomaster by an author who served as navigator in the Cargomaster during the last two years of its 15-year AF service. A brief history of strategic airlift precedes an account of USAF proof-of-concept testing of turboprop propulsion. C-133 design, development and flight testing provide the foundation for development of air and ground crew and worldwide airlift routes. Topical chapters cover technical information, C-133 employment, support to NASA and the strategic missile force and its employment in the Vietnam War and on special missions of all kinds. Of 50 built, ten C-133s were lost in accidents. The crashes chapter gives complete details of the accidents and the most comprehensive analysis available of the reasons for the losses. Three squadrons flew the C-133 and are detailed in their own chapter, as are histories of each of the fifty airplanes built. The book concludes with a chapter on the never-built Douglas C-132, which would have been the world's largest turboprop aircraft. More than 330 photos and illustrations show the airplanes and people. The index lists over 970 persons as well as other topics and there is an extensive bibliography. The16-page color section shows aircraft interiors and operational activities. Eight fold-out sheets contain large Douglas factory drawings and one large C-133 photograph.

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Image of Douglas C-124 Globemaster II (Air force legends)

Douglas C-124 Globemaster II (Air force legends)

Earl Berlin

The answer to a need for larger and faster commercial and military airlifters was provided by, among others, the Douglas aircraft company with its military C-74 and C-124 cargo planes.

The C-124 evolved from an earlier Douglas design, the C-74 Globemaster. Officially, it was the Globemaster II, but the name had no appear to the "drivers and fixers", so it came to be called "Old Shaky" or just plain "Shaky", and as time passed, the name was more often than not uttered with a kind of reverence.

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Image of Douglas C-124 Globemaster II (Air force legends)

Douglas C-124 Globemaster II (Air force legends)

Earl Berlin

The answer to a need for larger and faster commercial and military airlifters was provided by, among others, the Douglas aircraft company with its military C-74 and C-124 cargo planes.

The C-124 evolved from an earlier Douglas design, the C-74 Globemaster. Officially, it was the Globemaster II, but the name had no appear to the "drivers and fixers", so it came to be called "Old Shaky" or just plain "Shaky", and as time passed, the name was more often than not uttered with a kind of reverence.

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Cougar - First of the swept cats

Volume 23, Issue 1, 1982, Air International

Eric Brown

Capt Eric Brown continues with his "Viewed from the cockpit" series with an assessment of the Grumman F9F Cougar, the swept-wing derivative of the Panther and first shipboard fighter to feature wing sweep

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Saa-Fairchild: Set fair

Volume 23, Issue 1, 1982, Air International

William Green

Now rapidly taking shape in Sweden is the first prototype of the Saab-Fairchild 340, one of a new generation of commuter-liners. The managing editor reports from Linkoping on progress with this Swedish-American project

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From B-1 to LRCA

Volume 23, Issue 1, 1982, Air International

Graham Wilmer

Graham Wilmer describes in this article the way in which the Rockwell B-1 has been developed to meet the Long Range Combat Airceaft specification for the USAF, leading to it's production for the USAF

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Fiat BR.20: Stork A La Mode

Volume 22, Issue 6, 1982, Air International

A description in the "War-birds" series of the competent, if relatively little-known, twin-engined bomber that flew on all the combat fronts in which the Regia Aeronautica was engaged during World War II.

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Plane facts: Wibault 283, Shavrov Sh-2

Volume 22, Issue 4, 1982, Air International

Answers to readers enquiries from Air International filesL the Wibault 283 and Shavrov Sh-2

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The fortuitous "Avenger"

Volume 22, Issue 4, 1982, Air International

Our regular feature is devoted to the Junkers Ju 188, a derivative of the Ju 88 that enjoyed a shorter operational career with the Luftwaffe than the capabilities deserved

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A Corsair by any other name - part 2

Volume 22, Issue 4, 1982, Air International

Sandly, SLUF and little hummers

The second concluding instalment of our account of the Vought A-7 Corsair II family, including a cutaway drawing of the A-7K and first illustrations of the A-7P

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Final Furioso

Volume 18, Issue 2, 1980, Air International

Eric Brown

Capt Eric Brown continues his series on the handling of naval aircraft with an assessment of the Hawker Sea Fury, the last and perhaps the greatest of the Fleet Air Arms piston-engined fighters

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The Light Fighter Market...and a European proposal

Volume 18, Issue 2, 1980, Air International

A discussion of the market for the light fighters in the category of an "F-5 replacement", and details of the intriguing Swiss Piranha project which has been designed to fulfil this requirement

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V/Stol perspectives

Volume 18, Issue 2, 1980, Air International

Roy Braybrook

Includes 3-views of various Hawker projects, including P.1129, P.1121 and various configs of P.1127

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A Boeing for the 'Eighties

Volume 18, Issue 2, 1980, Air International

Now 18 months into its full-scale development programme, the Boeing 767 is already backed by orders and options for a total of 263 from eight airlines . Evolution of the 767 design is here traced in detail and we present the first complete cutaway drawing.

Includes 3-views of early proposals

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GULFSTREAM - VERSATILITY THROUGH CONCENTRATION

Volume 29, Issue 1, 1985, Air International

The Gulfstream III bizjet, still selling strongly, is
now providing the basis for a range of variants and derivatives th at make up the Gulfstream Aerospace product line, described in this article.

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Lockheeds giants from Georgia

Volume 26, Issue 2, 1984, Air International

Air International reports from the home of Lockheed-Georgia Company of Marietta on the resegence of activity around the C-5 Galaxy as C-5A's are rewinged and C-5B's enter production

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Image of Wings of Stearman: The Story of Lloyd Stearman and the Classic Stearman Biplanes (Historic Aircraft Series)

Wings of Stearman: The Story of Lloyd Stearman and the Classic Stearman Biplanes

Peter M Bowers

A history of the early airplanes designed by World War I naval airman Lloyd Carleton Stearman for the Stearman Aircraft Company in the 1920s-30s.

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Beaufighter - innovative improvisaion by Bristol

Volume 6, Issue 1, 1974, Air International

In the "Warbirds" series, we present the first part of the Beaufighter story, showing how one of World War II;s most successful warplanes emerged almost by chanve as a by-product of the Beaufort Bomber design

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Image of Henschel HS 129 (MMP: Orange)

HENSCHEL HS 129 (Orange Series)

Denes Bernad

Development combat history of Hs 129. color schemes and markings are described and illustrated.

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Image of Messerschmit ME 163 Komet (MMP: Orange)

MESSERSCHMIT ME 163 KOMET (Orange Series)

Bartlomiej Belcarz

Development a of Me 163 Komet

Plus detail photos and scale plans.

REVIEWS

“…superbly researched and illustrated book... Typical of Mushroom Models Publications, there is a full color section of detail images…Add to this the many pages of full color profiles of various aircraft shown in the period photos that are within the book as well as an insert of complete 1/72 and 1/48 plans, and you have yet another superlative book. It is one that I can quite easily recommend to you as the best of its type; a book that will be appreciated by both enthusiasts and modelers alike.”
Model Madness.com. 05/2010
“…an invaluable reference source for aircraft historians, enthusiasts and modelers.”
Cybermodeler.com, 05/2010


“…covers an incredible amount of history and detail… photographs and line drawings in the book contain a wealth of detail information. For scale modelers, who have an interest in the Me-163, this book is an invaluable resource. For aviation enthusiasts, particularly Luftwaffe fans, this book is a great read, and contains lots of interesting statistics and photographs. “
IPMS, 10/15/2010

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Image of Hellcat: The F6F in World War II

Hellcat: The F6F in World War II

Barrett Tillman

Largely responsible for crushing Japanese airpower wherever the American fast carrier force sailed, the Grumman F6F Hellcat was considered the most important Allied aircraft in the Pacific during 1943 and 1944. Designed for speed, range, and climb to compete with Japan's exceptional Mitsubishi A6M Zero, it succeeded not only in engaging the "Zeke" on equal terms but also in dictating the rules of combat. Fighters in every sense of the word, the Hellcats were credited with destroying more than five thousand Japanese aircraft, gaining outright air supremacy over the invasion beaches, and helping ensure Allied amphibious victories in the Central Pacific. Aviation historian Barrett Tillman presents the full story of the fighter plane--the men who built and tested it, the squadrons that flew it, and the heroes it created. Heavily illustrated with photographs from the pilots' own collections, this spirited, carefully documented operational history is an absolute must for anyone interested in aviation history. It is now available for the first time in paperback.

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Image of Mitsubishi A6M-1/2/2-N Zero-Sen of the Japanese Naval Air Service: (Schiffer Military/Aviation History)

Mitsubishi A6M-1/2/2-N Zero-Sen of the Japanese Naval Air Service

in Japanese Army Air Force Service Richard M Bueschel

Reknowned Japanese aircraft historian Richard Bueschel revises and updates his classic series of books on Japanese Naval and Army Air Force aircraft of World War II. The A6M-1/2/-2N ZERO-SEN is the first volume. All variations and markings are covered in this the first of a projected multi-volume series.

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Image of Mitsubishi/Nakajima G3M1/2/3 96 Rikko L3Y1/2 in Japanese Naval Air Service: (Schiffer Military/Aviation History)

Mitsubishi/Nakajima G3M1/2/3 96 Rikko L3Y1/2 in Japanese Naval Air Service

in Japanese Army Air Force Service Richard M Bueschel

Richard Bueschel revises and updates his classic series of books on Japanese Naval and Army Air Force aircraft of World War II. The Japanese navy Mitsubishi/Nakajima G3M1/2/3 96 RIKKO (Nell) is presented in this volume. All variations and markings are covered in this sixth book in a multi-volume series.

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Image of Nakajima Ki-49 Donryu in Japanese Army Air Force Service: (Schiffer Military Aviation History)

Nakajima Ki-49 Donryu in Japanese Army Air Force Service

in Japanese Army Air Force Service Richard M Bueschel

The JAAF Nakajima Ki-49 DONRYU (Helen) is presented in this volume. All variations, markings and units are covered in this, the seventh in a multi-volume series.

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Image of Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa: in Japanese Army Air Force RTAF-CAF-IPSF Service (Schiffer Military History Book)

Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa: in Japanese Army Air Force RTAF-CAF-IPSF Service

in Japanese Army Air Force Service Richard M Bueschel

Reknowned Japanese aircraft historians Richard Bueschel revises and updates his classic series of books on Japanese Naval and Army Air Force aircraft of World War II. The Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa is presented in this volume. All variations and markings are covered in this the second in a projected multi-volume series. The first volume in Bueschel's series covers the Mitsubishi A6M-1/2/2-N Zero-Sen(available from Schiffer Publishing Ltd.).

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Image of Kawasaki Ki-61 HIEN in Japanese Army Air Force Service: (Schiffer Military History)

Kawasaki Ki-61 Hien in Japanese Army Air Force Service

in Japanese Army Air Force Service Richard M Bueschel

Richard Bueschel revises and updates his classic series of books on Japanese Naval and Army Air Force aircraft of World War II. The JAAF Kawasaki Ki-61 HIEN (Tony) is presented in this volume. All variations and markings are covered in this the fourth in a projected multi-volume series.

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Image of Nakajima Ki-84 a/b Hayate in Japanese Army Air Force Service: (Schiffer Military Aviation History)

Nakajima Ki-84 a/b Hayate in Japanese Army Air Force Service

in Japanese Army Air Force Service Richard M Bueschel

Richard Bueschel revises and updates his classic series of books on Japanese Naval and Army Air Force aircraft of World War II. The JAAF Nakajima Ki-84 HAYATE (Frank) is presented in this volume. All variations and markings are covered in this fifth book in a multi-volume series.

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Image of Mitsubishi Ki-67/Ki-109 Hiryu in Japanese Army Air Force Service: (Schiffer Military/Aviation History)

Mitsubishi Ki-67/Ki-109 Hiryu in Japanese Army Air Force Service

Richard M Bueschel

The JAAF Mitsubishi Ki-67/Ki-109 HIRYU (Peggy) is presented in this volume. All variations, markings and units are covered in this, the eighth in a multi-volume series.

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Image of Nakajima Ki-44 Shoki in Japanese Army Air Force Service (Schiffer military/aviation history)

Nakajima Ki-44 Shoki in Japanese Army Air Force Service

Richard M Beuschel

All variations and markings are covered in this the third book in a multi-volume series.

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Image of The Focke-Wulf Ta 152 (Monogram Monarch)

The Focke-Wulf Ta 152

Judy Crandall , Thomas H Hitchcock

The Focke-Wulf Ta 152 was a high-performance airplane produced in small numbers that appeared late in the war. It was the culmination of a research and development program that brought together an advance high-performance engine within an innovative airframe. These, in conjunction with an entirely new wing, allowed the Ta 152 to outperform its contemporaries at all altitudes. Presented are five enlightening and lavishly illustrated chapters, each woven around a twelve month period beginning in 1941. Read about test pilots and operational crews who flew the fighter into combat. Too, learn why the Germans rushed the Ta 152 into production while at the same time it was undergoing continuous testing and evaluation. Only one example of the Ta 152 survives and is part of the unrestored collection of WW2 fighters at the National Air and Space Museum. Many of the photos in this title have never been previously published. The descriptive line drawings offer complete three views, sectionals, charts, detail views and general arrangement drawings including maps. Full color profiles by leading illustrators detail camouflage and markings as interpreted from the provided photos. Four appendices include: camouflage, insignia and markings; production and Werknummern; specifications, weights, performance and equipment; pilot operating instructions and systems. This history of the Ta 152 and its lesser known cousin the Ta 153 is also a colorful journey into the Third Reich. It occurs in a time when the political and military interests of the dictatorship were clouded under a veil of self-deception. It is a story of strong rivalries, of divided loyalties and outright survival, all of which ultimately proved disastrous for the Nazi regime. This story also addresses a cast of characters that include the chief of state, his deputies, and the chief executive officers of competing aircraft companies, designers, engineers, test pilots and front-line fighter units. 180 photos, 40 color plus 36 color illustrations, 75 drawings and 19 tables and charts.

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Image of Messerschmitt Bf 110/Me 210/Me 410: An Illustrated History

Messerschmitt Bf 110/Me 210/Me 410: An Illustrated History

Heinz Mankau , Peter Petrick

For the first time, this richly illustrated book offers a comprehensive, detailed examination of the legendary Messerschmitt Bf 110, Me 210, and Me 410 series. By 1935 the Bf 109 had made Messerschmitt the leading manufacturer of fighter aircraft in Germany. The twin-engined Bf 110 followed on its heels in 1936, a type the Luftwaffe took on in large numbers as a long-range fighter, heavy-fighter, fighter-bomber, night-fighter and reconnaissance platform. As its successor, Messerschmitt developed the better performing Me 210, which flew for the first time in 1939. But this airframe soon began manifesting serious design flaws, and accidents with the Me 210 quickly started piling up due to the types questionable flight handling characteristics. The Luftwaffe refused to accept any more aircraft as a result, and at a stroke the types overzealous full scale production ground to a halt. More powerful engines and a number of design changes saw this aircraft produced from 1943 to 1944 under the designation of Me 410, and as such the type gave an excellent accounting of itself in service with the Luftwaffe.

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Feederjet formula

Volume 6, Issue 1, 1974, Air International

THe first major new civil aircraft to go ahead in Britain for more than a dexade, the Hawker Siddley HS.146 has been launched agter a 15-year period of market analysis and project studies in the feederliner field by Hawker Sideley. This account describes and illustrates both the HS 146 and the projects that proceeded it at Hatfield and Woodford

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Dogfighter supreme: THe Tomcat

Volume 6, Issue 1, 1974, Air International

David Godfrey

THe Grumman F-14 Tomcat, fast approaching full operational status witht he US Navy is gaining recognition as one of the West's most potent fighters. David W H Godfrey here describes the tomcat's concept and characteristics, and we publish a highly detailed cutaway drawing

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Image of Convair B-36: A Comprehensive History of Americas Big Stick (Schiffer Military/Aviation History)

Convair B-36: A Comprehensive History of Americas Big Stick

Meyers K Jacobsen

Convair B-36: A Comprehensive History of Americas Big Stick is a collaborative effort edited and co-authored by Meyers Jacobsen exploring the history of one of SACs air giants, the six-engine Convair B-36. From the origins of the use of six engines on

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No. 42 - B-36 Peacemaker in action

Aircraft in Action Meyers K. Jacobsen , Meyers K Jacobsen

Consolidated Aircraft Corporation, of San Diego, California had won a prototype contract in September 1940 for the XB-32 long-range bomber (2000 lb/4450 miles), a counterpart to the Boeing B-29, and had progressed to a Model 35 design with four engines and 164 ft. span. Enlarged to six pusher engines, this design was submitted to the Air Material Division on October 6,1941, competing with proposals by Boeing, Douglas, and Northrop. On the recommendation of Brig. Gen. George S. Kenney, the Air Force approved a prototype contract for the Consolidated design, as well as one for the radical Northrop XB-35 four-engined flying wing. This contract, issued October 25, and approved November 15, 1941, called for two XB-36 aircraft, the first to be delivered in 30 months, or about May 1944. Total engineering and construction cost was to be $15 million, with the company to get an $800,000 fixed fee.

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No. 42 - B-36 Peacemaker in action

Aircraft in Action Meyers K. Jacobsen , Meyers K Jacobsen

Consolidated Aircraft Corporation, of San Diego, California had won a prototype contract in September 1940 for the XB-32 long-range bomber (2000 lb/4450 miles), a counterpart to the Boeing B-29, and had progressed to a Model 35 design with four engines and 164 ft. span. Enlarged to six pusher engines, this design was submitted to the Air Material Division on October 6,1941, competing with proposals by Boeing, Douglas, and Northrop. On the recommendation of Brig. Gen. George S. Kenney, the Air Force approved a prototype contract for the Consolidated design, as well as one for the radical Northrop XB-35 four-engined flying wing. This contract, issued October 25, and approved November 15, 1941, called for two XB-36 aircraft, the first to be delivered in 30 months, or about May 1944. Total engineering and construction cost was to be $15 million, with the company to get an $800,000 fixed fee.

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Those versatile Vultees

Volume 3, Issue 1, 1972, Air International

The first aeroplane to bear the Vultee name was, for its day, and advanced all metal monoplane design to procide swift transportation for the passengers accommodated comfortabling in a totally enclosed cabin. As our account of the Vultee V-1 shows, its success in this role was only partial, but it also provided the basis for the more widely used V011 and V-12 military models (illustrated with cutaway drawings) which enjoyed chequered careers

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Nakajima Demonology ... the story of the Shoki

Volume 3, Issue 1, 1972, Air International

An account of the development and operational use of the Nakajima Ki 44 Shoki (Demon), one of Japan;s signifigant new combat aircraft of World War II, is given in this "Warbirds" feature, which includes a new cutaway drawing and a page of colour profiles

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B-1: Deterrent or Dodo?

Volume 3, Issue 1, 1972, Air International

G Morris , Gerald T Morris

Major Gerald T Morris, USAF, recounts the story of the North American B-1 Supersonic strategic bomber now under construction in Los Angeles and a candidate for production as a B-52 replacement later in the present decade. The illustrations include an exclusive new cutaway and a page of colour profiles

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Koolhoven F.K.52

Volume 12, Issue 6, 1976, Air Classics

Biplane escort fighter of the 1930's with Coles drawings

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Image of Consolidated PBY Catalina (Warpaint, 79)

Consolidated PBY Catalina (Warpaint no 79)

Warpaint Books Charles Stafrace

72 pages. The PBY Catalina was the best known flying boat of WWII. Remembered for its ruggedness and resilience, it is no wonder that from its introduction in US Navy service in 1936 and throughout its continued use by other air forces into the 1980s, it distinguished itself as one of the most versatile military aircraft ever built. Conceived as a patrol bomber, during its military lifetime it carried out such disparate duties as torpedo bomber, convoy escort, anti-submarine warfare, long-range reconnaissance, SAR, night bombing, level bombing and strafing. The Catalina was built both as a flying boat and as an amphibian, and owing to it continued use after the war in both military and civil roles, its fame has only increased. Illustrated with full color artwork and profiles, detailed scale drawings and more than 120 photographs.

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Image of Consolidated PBY Catalina (Warpaint, 79)

Consolidated PBY Catalina (Warpaint no 79)

Warpaint Books Charles Stafrace

72 pages. The PBY Catalina was the best known flying boat of WWII. Remembered for its ruggedness and resilience, it is no wonder that from its introduction in US Navy service in 1936 and throughout its continued use by other air forces into the 1980s, it distinguished itself as one of the most versatile military aircraft ever built. Conceived as a patrol bomber, during its military lifetime it carried out such disparate duties as torpedo bomber, convoy escort, anti-submarine warfare, long-range reconnaissance, SAR, night bombing, level bombing and strafing. The Catalina was built both as a flying boat and as an amphibian, and owing to it continued use after the war in both military and civil roles, its fame has only increased. Illustrated with full color artwork and profiles, detailed scale drawings and more than 120 photographs.

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Image of GLOSTER AND AW METEOR, THE

THE GLOSTER AND AW METEOR

Modellers Datafile Richard Caruana , Richard Franks

Covers Gloster and Armstrong-Whitworth variants. Full chronology of the type's development and operational use. Photo coverage of preserved examples. Variants, squadrons, operators, production. Color side-views. Scale fold out plans. Kit, decal and accessory listing.

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Image of Otter and Twin Otter: The Universal Airplanes

Otter and Twin Otter: The Universal Airplanes

Sean Rossiter

Following the success of the Beaver aircraft, the engineers and test pilots who developed it decided to build an airplane that could do everything the Beaver could — with twice the capacity and payload — and the Otter was born. The Otter was a great airplane, but why not make it perfect with twin-engine reliability and nosewheel landing gear? There were complications, but the result, the Twin Otter, was another winner. With more than 100 photographs, Otter and Twin Otter is a must for plane buffs.

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Image of De Havilland Vampire: The Complete History

De Havilland Vampire: The Complete History

David Watkins

The de Havilland Vampire was the second of the RAF's first-generation post-Second World War jet fighters to enter service. This twin-boom fighter began life as an interceptor but was soon re-tasked in the day fighter/ground-attack roles with the 2nd Tactical Air Force in Germany from 1948 to 1954, and with the RAF's Middle and Far East Air Forces. In addition to playing a full part in the RAF's battle order during the 1940s and '50s, the Vampire also served with the Fleet Air Arm and quickly became an export success story for the British aircraft industry with hundreds of aircraft sold to dozens of foreign air forces world-wide. For a short spell during the early 1950s the Vampire formed the backbone of the RAF's nightfighter force and, importantly, between 1952 and 1967, the Vampire trainer was responsible for a steady flow of trained pilots for the RAF, Royal Navy and foreign air forces. Throughout its 46-year career, the Vampire has collected many notable firsts: the first jet fighter to cross the Atlantic, the first jet to land on an aircraft carrier, and the first jet trainer on which student pilots actually qualified for their 'wings'. David Watkins' history is comprehensive and covers the Vampire's development and operational service. It has been written with the full cooperation of the manufacturer, the MoD, RAF and other world air forces, mixing narrative and technical detail with vivid personal accounts from pilots and ground crews. Comprehensive appendices include RAF and FAA Vampire squadrons, technical specifications, production details, serials and export details. De Havilland Vampire: The Complete History is illustrated throughout with a varied and interesting selectionof photographs and line drawings, many previously unpublished. By correcting many of the errors previously written about the Vampire, it will appeal to historians and everyone with an interest in the RAF and its early jet aircraft, not to mention those who actually served in the R

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Image of North American A-36A Apache (Yellow (MMP Books))

NORTH AMERICAN A-36A APACHE

MMP Books - Yellow Przemyslaw Skulski

The initial version of the famous P-51 Mustang to go into USAAF service was the dedicated fighter-bomber variant, the A-36A "Apache". This book describes and illustrates the design and development of this version of the most famous American WWII fighter.It contains: Scale plans, photos and drawings from technical manuals, superb color illustrations of camouflage and markings, rare black and white archive photographs, and color photos of the preserved aircraft. It is essential reading for aviation enthusiasts and scale aeromodelers.

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Image of Bell P-39 Airacobra (Orange)

BELL P-39 AIRACOBRA (Orange)

MMP Books - Orange Robert Peczkowski

Designed as an interceptor, when the Bell P-39 Airacobra appeared in 1941 it was acclaimed as one of the most advanced combat planes of the time. Elegantly designed and innovatively engineered (it featured the engine mid-aircraft like a racing car), it experienced mixed operational fortunes but was especially successful in the Soviet Air Force. This book is a full technical history of this important but neglected fighter of World War Two. It presents scale plans of all versions, many detailed photographs of surviving aircraft, full color illustrations of the aircraft in the different liveries of its many users: USAAF, RAF, Soviet, French, Italian and others, in total more than 50 color profiles.

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Image of Bell P-39 Airacobra (Crowood Aviation Series)

Bell P-39 Airacobra

Crowood aviation series Jeremy C Scutts , Robert F Dorr

This text tells the story of Bell's Cobras, from their design and introduction, through their use in the Far East and Russia, to their eventual retirement.

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Image of Black Jets: The Development and Operation of America's Most Secret Warplane

Black Jets: The Development and Operation of America's Most Secret Warplane

David Donald

This book includes in-depth profiles of the four 'black' programs that led to development of the F-117 Stealth Fighter, B-2 Stealth Bomber, SR-71 Blackbird and U-2 Dragon Lady spy plane. Describes each aircraft in full, including development history, variants, service record, operators, specifications, weapons, avionics and mission systems.

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Image of Modern Battlefield Warplanes

Modern Battlefield Warplanes

David Donald

Attack aircraft have always played a vital role in supporting the troups on the ground and neutralizing ground-to-air threats. Modern Battlefield Warplanes profiles six aircraft/helicopters currently in service designed to fight over the battlefield -- America's A-10 Thunderbolt II, AH-64 Apache and AH-1 Cobra; the British/American AV-8B Harrier; and Russia's Ka-50 'Hokum', Mil-24 'Hind' and Su-25 'Frogfoot'. Packed with in-depth information and superbly illustrated throughout, this volume is the most complete work of its kind and an important battlefield warfare reference. Includes full development histories, mission data, descriptions of each type's avionics and weapon loads, current and past operators, and detailed specifications.

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Nimrod Capabilities Enhanced

Volume 24, Issue 4, 1983, Air International

The special demands of the conflict in the South Atlantic led to a number of new equipment and weapons options being applied to maritime reconnaissance Nimrods, as described in this account, with an updated cutaway drawing and new photographs

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Strike Force South

Volume 24, Issue 4, 1983, Air International

Paul Jackson

In a further account in our series describing the air actions during the Falklands conflict , Paul Jacksn describes the preperation, deployment and active service of Harrier GR Mk 3s of No 1 Squadron, RAF, and we publish a cutaway drawing showing the latest modifications

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Image of Century Jets: USAF Frontline Fighters of the Cold War

Century Jets: USAF Frontline Fighters of the Cold War

David Donald

9x 12, 700 color photos, 300 b&w photosThis title contains in-depth profiles of the six operational 'Century Series' fighters developed during the Cold War: F-100 Super Sabre, F-101 Voodoo, F-102 Delta Dagger, F-104 Starfighter, F-105 Thunderchief and F-106 Delta Dart. Includes type development history, variants, service record, operators, specifications, weapons, avionics and mission systems. The book is lavishly illustrated throughout with a staggering array of photos, patches, nose art, three-view and side-view color artworks, cutaways and color three-quarter-views.2 dozen technical drawings, 13 full-color three-view artworks, 48 side-view color profiles, 4 two-page color three-quarter views, 5 two-page cutaways, 70 squadron tail markings, 100 squadron patches

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Lockheed's stretched Starlifter

Volume 24, Issue 3, 1983, Air International

The USAF has effectively increased the size of its transport force by 90 Lockheed Starlifters as a result of the programme - completed in 1982 - to "strech" all of its C-141's. The programme and the history of the C-141, are outlined here

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Embraers Tractable Tucano

Volume 24, Issue 1, 1983, Air International

John Fricker

John Fricker flies for Air international, the latest product of Brazil's dynamic aircraft industry, the T-27 Tucano high performance turboprop trainer

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Image of Scooter: The Douglas A-4 Skyhawk Story

Scooter: The Douglas A-4 Skyhawk Story

Tommy H Thomason

Few modern military aircraft can claim the longevity and overall success enjoyed by the legendary Douglas A-4 Skyhawk. Also known as the Bantam Bomber and Scooter the small, subsonic A-4 first flew in the mid-1950s during the burgeoning era of larger and much more complex supersonic jet fighters. The Skyhawk broke the mold, however, by becoming America's first simple, low-cost, and lightweight jet-powered attack aircraft. Still in use today in South America, the Skyhawk enjoyed a 25-year production run.
A-4s achieved combat fame in the Falklands Islands War and the Vietnam War where one even scored a kill against a faster Soviet-built MiG. Used by the air arms of seven foreign countries as well as the U.S. Navy's famed Blue Angels Flight Demonstration team, the A-4 Skyhawk remains a fascination for naval aviation enthusiasts nearly six decades after it first took to the sky.

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CF-101 Voodoo, Aircraft No. 2

Canadian Profile Robert McIntyre

An account of the CF 101 Voodoo,the Canadian fighter jet built by McDonnell with lots of photos and information about the plane & it's armaments.

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Image of The Avro CF-100

The Avro CF-100

Larry Milberry

THE AVRO CF-100 Still in service after 30 years in the air, the Avro CF-100 twin-jet interceptor is one of Canada's great aviation success stories. It is the only Canadian-designed fighter to go into mass production. Known officially as the Canuck, and unofficially as the Clunk, the Lead Sled, the Aluminum Crow as well as other sometimes unmentionable names, the CF-100 was once a familiar sight in Canadian and European skies. With its Orenda engines housed in bulky fuselage-hugging nacelles, it is a distinctive looking aircraft. This text tells the story of the aircraft and the people who flew it.

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Image of A-10 Warthog - MINI in action No. 4

A-10 Warthog - MINI in action No. 4

Aircraft in Action "Minis" Ken Neubeck

"As a result of its experience with the problems of providing ground support in Vietnam and the existing Soviet threat in Europe, especially their superiority in armor, the Air Force determined there was a need for specialized Close Air Support (CAS) aircraft. INCLUDES: ""A-10 Warthog Mini In Action"" - 50 Pages - 11"" x 8.25"" FEATURES: **Author: Ken Neubeck **Color By: Don Greer and Tom Tullis **Illustrated By: Joe Sewell **History and development **Specifications and diagrams **Photographs and captions **Information on (A-10A Thunderbolt II

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Image of A-10 Warthog - MINI in action No. 4

A-10 Warthog - MINI in action No. 4

Aircraft in Action "Minis" Ken Neubeck

"As a result of its experience with the problems of providing ground support in Vietnam and the existing Soviet threat in Europe, especially their superiority in armor, the Air Force determined there was a need for specialized Close Air Support (CAS) aircraft. INCLUDES: ""A-10 Warthog Mini In Action"" - 50 Pages - 11"" x 8.25"" FEATURES: **Author: Ken Neubeck **Color By: Don Greer and Tom Tullis **Illustrated By: Joe Sewell **History and development **Specifications and diagrams **Photographs and captions **Information on (A-10A Thunderbolt II

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Image of North American A/RA-5 Vigilante - MINI in action No. 3

North American A/RA-5 Vigilante - MINI in action No. 3

Aircraft in Action "Minis" Terry Love

Originally built for the US Navy as a nuclear attack bomber, it was later modified & saw extensive service as the RA-5C reconnaissance aircraft. Saw widespread use during the Vietnam War. Over 50 photos 25 detail drawings, 2 pages of scale drawings 10 full-color paintings. 50 pages.

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Image of Great Book of World War II Airplanes

Great Book of World War II Airplanes

Jeffrey L Ethell

A remarkable overview of World War II aviation encompasses more than four hundred full-color photographs and illustrations, twenty-four foldout panels, detailed cutaway views, and authoritative profiles of twelve aircraft that changed the course of the war.

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Image of Chance Vought F6U Pirate: Naval Fighters Number Nine

Chance Vought F6U Pirate: Naval Fighters Number Nine

Naval Fighters Steve Ginter

It was 1944, and a new age in aviation was dawning in the European skies, the jet age. As more German jets appeared in combat, it became a foregone conclusion that Japan would be producing them too. These facts prompted the Navy to issue a requirement for carrier jet fighters. In late 1944 BuAer sent requests to several manufacturers for jet proposals. From all the proposals submitted, BuAer technical desk chose three designs to be developed. This is the story of one of the three: The Chance Vought F6U Pirate.

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Aircraft Profile 10 - Gloster Gauntlet

Profile Publications Francis K Mason

"The Gloster Gauntlet is perhaps often overshadowed by its more illustrious successor, the Gladiator, yet apart from its greater popularity as a "pilot's aeroplane" in its own right, it should be remembered that had war been declared at the time of the Munich Crisis, Britain's first-line fighter strength at that time depended more upon the Gauntlet than any other type of aircraft.
Developed from a long line of fighter biplanes (which, designed by H. P. Folland, had included the well-known Grebe and Gamecock of the mid 'twenties), the Gauntlet's true origin lay in the Gloster 5.5.18. Specification F.9/26, initially issued in 1926"...

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Aircraft Profile 10 - Gloster Gauntlet

Profile Publications Francis K Mason

"The Gloster Gauntlet is perhaps often overshadowed by its more illustrious successor, the Gladiator, yet apart from its greater popularity as a "pilot's aeroplane" in its own right, it should be remembered that had war been declared at the time of the Munich Crisis, Britain's first-line fighter strength at that time depended more upon the Gauntlet than any other type of aircraft.
Developed from a long line of fighter biplanes (which, designed by H. P. Folland, had included the well-known Grebe and Gamecock of the mid 'twenties), the Gauntlet's true origin lay in the Gloster 5.5.18. Specification F.9/26, initially issued in 1926"...

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No. 28 - B-47 Stratojet in Action

Aircraft in Action Lou Drendel

The B-47 was the backbone of SAC's bomber fleet in the 'fifties, yet only 2,042 Stratojets were built for the "Cold War" period. Compare this with the over 12,700 B-17s built for use during World War Two. Although only a relatively small number of B-47s were built, those were quite capable of doing the job in the early to middle years of the jet age. Design on what was to become the B-47 began in 1943. It was not until 1945, however, that its definitive form began to take shape. In competition with the XB-45, XB-46, XB-48 and XB-49, only the last could offer any design advancement that could compare with the XB-47. With six jet engines, a 35-degree swept wing and a surprisingly small crew of three, the Stratojet was a daring leap forward in aircraft design. The Air Force was very pleased with Boeing's design and two prototypes (46-065 and 46-066) were ordered. 46-065 was rolled out of its Seattle hanger on 12 September 1947. Powered by 3,750-lb. thrust General Electric J35s, it...

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No. 30 - Messerschmitt Bf 110 Zerstorer in action

Aircraft in Action Jerry L. Campbell

The strategic fighter concept was first evolved during the air battles of WWI when the air forces of both sides found themselves in need of a fighter that could penetrate deep into enemy territory escorting bombers, attacking hostile aircraft and targets far behind enemy lines. Technology did not permit such an aircraft to evolve during the 1914-1918 war and during the twenties lack of interest in military aviation delayed the resurrection of the concept until the middle thirties when the rise of Nazi Germany gave new impetus to the development of military hardware both inside and outside of Germany. 1934 can be pointed to as the year of the strategic fighter. In Poland the P.Z.L. P.38 Wolf won a design competition, in France specifications for a strategic fighter were issued, and in Germany specifications for a Kampfzerstorer design were given out. The concept of a strategic fighter, or Kampfzerstorer (Battle-destroyer), as it became known in Germany, caught the imagination of...

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No. 44 - Messerschmitt Bf 109 in Action, Part 1

Aircraft in Action John R. Beaman Jr.

It is ironic to think that the Messerschmltt Bf 109. World War ll's best known and certainly most numerously produced fighter, was almost discarded out of hand. During the late 1920s. Willy Messerschmitt, at the request of Deutsche Lufthansa (DLH), designed a metal, high-wing monoplane airliner capable of carrying ten passengers. Built by Bayerische Flugzeugwerke (BFW). Messerschmitt's production sister company, the M-20 airliner prototype crashed on 26 February 1928, the pilot being killed when he tried to jump from 250 feet. The head of DLH. Erhard Milch, immediately cancelled the order. In August the second prototype was flown and, when the M-20 was pronounced safe, DLH purchased two machines and ordered a further ten. Before deliveries were completed, however, two M-20s crashed in rapid succession. In one of the crashes eight Reichswehr officers died with a great deal of publicity appearing in the newspapers and even discussions on the floor of the Reichstag. Erhard Milch...

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No. 43 - P-39 Airacobra in action

Aircraft in Action Ernest R McDowell

The Bell P-39 Airacobra, and its descendant the P-63 Kingcobra, represent perhaps the first application of "weapons system" thinking to aircraft design. The P-39, or the Bell Model 3 from which it derived, was only the second design to emerge from the new Bell Aircraft Corp. Robert J. Woods, Bell's chief designer, and his assistant Harland M. Poyer, saw a demonstration of a 37mm Oldsmobile cannon in 1935. Impressed by the power that this weapon represented, the pair decided to design an interceptor around the new cannon, the essence of a "weapons system". The 37mm cannon was a formidable weapon but presented equally formidable problems to the designer, being much heavier than the normally-mounted MGs and generating much heavier recoil forces. Woods decided that the only practical position for this weapon was on the centerline. Since sychronizing such a weapon to fire through the propeller arc was considered too dangerous, Woods decided to mount the bulky cannon to fire through the...

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No. 43 - P-39 Airacobra in action

Aircraft in Action Ernest R McDowell

The Bell P-39 Airacobra, and its descendant the P-63 Kingcobra, represent perhaps the first application of "weapons system" thinking to aircraft design. The P-39, or the Bell Model 3 from which it derived, was only the second design to emerge from the new Bell Aircraft Corp. Robert J. Woods, Bell's chief designer, and his assistant Harland M. Poyer, saw a demonstration of a 37mm Oldsmobile cannon in 1935. Impressed by the power that this weapon represented, the pair decided to design an interceptor around the new cannon, the essence of a "weapons system". The 37mm cannon was a formidable weapon but presented equally formidable problems to the designer, being much heavier than the normally-mounted MGs and generating much heavier recoil forces. Woods decided that the only practical position for this weapon was on the centerline. Since sychronizing such a weapon to fire through the propeller arc was considered too dangerous, Woods decided to mount the bulky cannon to fire through the...

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No. 47 - C-130 Hercules in action

Aircraft in Action Lou Drendel

Though the two YO-130 prototypes were built at Lockheed's Burbank, California plant, production of all subsequent models was to take place at Lockheed-Georgia. The Lockheed plant at Marietta, Georgia is the largest of its kind in the world. It had been built during World War II and operated by Bell, which built B-29s under license from Boeing. At the conclusion of the war it was turned into a storage facility, only to be reopened by Lockheed in 1951 after they had received a contract to refurbish mothballed B-29s for the war in Korea. Lockheed also received a contract to manufacture B-47s under license. The Georgia Division's performance on this contract, in which 394 B-47s were built, resulted in the return to DoD of several million dollars in allocated defense funds. This was an unheard of event, before or since, and Lockheed executives were itching to get a contract for their super-efficient Georgia division. The award of the C-130 contract to Lockheed in 1952 ensured continued...

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No. 47 - C-130 Hercules in action

Aircraft in Action Lou Drendel

Though the two YO-130 prototypes were built at Lockheed's Burbank, California plant, production of all subsequent models was to take place at Lockheed-Georgia. The Lockheed plant at Marietta, Georgia is the largest of its kind in the world. It had been built during World War II and operated by Bell, which built B-29s under license from Boeing. At the conclusion of the war it was turned into a storage facility, only to be reopened by Lockheed in 1951 after they had received a contract to refurbish mothballed B-29s for the war in Korea. Lockheed also received a contract to manufacture B-47s under license. The Georgia Division's performance on this contract, in which 394 B-47s were built, resulted in the return to DoD of several million dollars in allocated defense funds. This was an unheard of event, before or since, and Lockheed executives were itching to get a contract for their super-efficient Georgia division. The award of the C-130 contract to Lockheed in 1952 ensured continued...

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No. 49 - A-10 Warthog in Action

Aircraft in Action Lou Drendel

As the Bi-Centennial year dawned, the A-10 was wowing 'em at Nellis and had already picked up the name that would stick, official naming contests to the contrary. They were calling it Warthog in honor of its general ugliness, and specifically because of the wartlike rivets that made its skin resemble that of Phacohoerus aetheopicus. In February DOD authorized the Air Force to get the production line cranked up to 15 aircraft per month, and the fourth production aircraft was delivered directly to the 355th TFTW at Davis-Monthan. In March the Air Force announced that the first operational Air Combat Wing to get the A-10 would be the 354th at Myrtle Beach AFB, S.C. That same month AFSC completed their testing of the A-10. turning it over officially to TAC. The Warthog began its final operational test and evaluation at the 355th TFTW in August. It flew to England for the Farnborough Air Show in September, and afterward continued on to the Continent for a tour of key military...

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No. 49 - A-10 Warthog in Action

Aircraft in Action Lou Drendel

As the Bi-Centennial year dawned, the A-10 was wowing 'em at Nellis and had already picked up the name that would stick, official naming contests to the contrary. They were calling it Warthog in honor of its general ugliness, and specifically because of the wartlike rivets that made its skin resemble that of Phacohoerus aetheopicus. In February DOD authorized the Air Force to get the production line cranked up to 15 aircraft per month, and the fourth production aircraft was delivered directly to the 355th TFTW at Davis-Monthan. In March the Air Force announced that the first operational Air Combat Wing to get the A-10 would be the 354th at Myrtle Beach AFB, S.C. That same month AFSC completed their testing of the A-10. turning it over officially to TAC. The Warthog began its final operational test and evaluation at the 355th TFTW in August. It flew to England for the Farnborough Air Show in September, and afterward continued on to the Continent for a tour of key military...

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No. 54 - SB2C Helldiver in action

Aircraft in Action Robert Stern

The Curtiss SB2C Helldiver was, at best, an adequate divebomber. At its worst, it more than earned its numerous derogatory nicknames: 'Big Tailed Beast' (often shortened to just 'Beast'...there was no risk of confusion), 'Son-of-a-Bitch 2nd Class' and others even less delicate. Yet the reasons why it was so universally hated had nothing to do with Curtiss' or Project Engineer Ray Blaylock's ability to design aircraft. It had to do with the Navy's original specification, with the Navy's stubborn insistence that the Beast be the first truly mass-produced aircraft, and with the unfortunate fact that a war happened in the middle of all this. When the SBD Dauntless entered production in 1938, the Navy Bureau of Aeronautics began the hunt for its successor. While the Dauntless was a well-designed aircraft, which earned many more friends that the Beast ever would, BuAer knew that its speed, range and payload could all be improved upon. Therefore, a requirement was circulated, calling for...

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No. 54 - SB2C Helldiver in action

Aircraft in Action Robert Stern

The Curtiss SB2C Helldiver was, at best, an adequate divebomber. At its worst, it more than earned its numerous derogatory nicknames: 'Big Tailed Beast' (often shortened to just 'Beast'...there was no risk of confusion), 'Son-of-a-Bitch 2nd Class' and others even less delicate. Yet the reasons why it was so universally hated had nothing to do with Curtiss' or Project Engineer Ray Blaylock's ability to design aircraft. It had to do with the Navy's original specification, with the Navy's stubborn insistence that the Beast be the first truly mass-produced aircraft, and with the unfortunate fact that a war happened in the middle of all this. When the SBD Dauntless entered production in 1938, the Navy Bureau of Aeronautics began the hunt for its successor. While the Dauntless was a well-designed aircraft, which earned many more friends that the Beast ever would, BuAer knew that its speed, range and payload could all be improved upon. Therefore, a requirement was circulated, calling for...

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No. 55 - SR-71 Blackbird in action

Aircraft in Action Lou Drendel

It is cold up here. At least minus 60 degrees Centigrade most of the time. There is not a lot of weather. Clouds almost never get within 10,000 feet of this altitude. You can see almost forever...even make out the curvature of the earth. The sky is very, very dark blue. Ultramarine. You can see the stars at any time of the day. Not much air up here either. Humans can't survive up here without pressurization. Their blood would boil instantly, and their skin would flake off like a just-right pie crust. Not that we see many humans up here. Oh, we get the occasional astronaut or cosmonaut coming or going. And the teeming masses down there do keep sending up weather balloons, trying to figure out what the jet stream has in store for them. There are some people who do come through fairly regularly. They are members of the 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, which is part of the United States Air Force. They are home-based at Beale Air Force Base in California, but I have heard that they...

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No. 55 - SR-71 Blackbird in action

Aircraft in Action Lou Drendel

It is cold up here. At least minus 60 degrees Centigrade most of the time. There is not a lot of weather. Clouds almost never get within 10,000 feet of this altitude. You can see almost forever...even make out the curvature of the earth. The sky is very, very dark blue. Ultramarine. You can see the stars at any time of the day. Not much air up here either. Humans can't survive up here without pressurization. Their blood would boil instantly, and their skin would flake off like a just-right pie crust. Not that we see many humans up here. Oh, we get the occasional astronaut or cosmonaut coming or going. And the teeming masses down there do keep sending up weather balloons, trying to figure out what the jet stream has in store for them. There are some people who do come through fairly regularly. They are members of the 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, which is part of the United States Air Force. They are home-based at Beale Air Force Base in California, but I have heard that they...

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No. 52 - Lancaster in Action

Aircraft in Action R. S. G. Mackay

The Lancaster bomber holds a special place of affection mingled with a great deal of pride in the hearts of British and Commonwealth citizens — feelings which perhaps find their parallel in the hearts of Americans toward the B-17 Flying Fortress. Just as the Spitfire epitomized the Commonwealth's supreme spirit of defiance in the face of seemingly irresistible defeat, so the evening sight and sound of streams of Lancasters "heading out" toward the heartland of the German Reich was the ultimate translation of a war-weary people's will to see the Nazi military and industrial machine — the source of colossal suffering for so much of the world — battered into oblivion. Like all successful aircraft the Lancaster not only looked good but its flying characteristics matched its appearance. It is all the more ironic therefore that the birth of Avro's mighty machine owed so much to failure, the failure of its immediate predecessor, the Manchester.

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No. 52 - Lancaster in Action

Aircraft in Action R. S. G. Mackay

The Lancaster bomber holds a special place of affection mingled with a great deal of pride in the hearts of British and Commonwealth citizens — feelings which perhaps find their parallel in the hearts of Americans toward the B-17 Flying Fortress. Just as the Spitfire epitomized the Commonwealth's supreme spirit of defiance in the face of seemingly irresistible defeat, so the evening sight and sound of streams of Lancasters "heading out" toward the heartland of the German Reich was the ultimate translation of a war-weary people's will to see the Nazi military and industrial machine — the source of colossal suffering for so much of the world — battered into oblivion. Like all successful aircraft the Lancaster not only looked good but its flying characteristics matched its appearance. It is all the more ironic therefore that the birth of Avro's mighty machine owed so much to failure, the failure of its immediate predecessor, the Manchester.

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No. 58 - Harrier in Action

Aircraft in Action Don Linn

The worth of a fighter aircraft cannot be fully realized until it is tested in combat, wargames and mock combat are fine for training, but until an enemy has been met and locked in a life or death struggle, the metal of either a fighting man or fighting aircraft can not be ascertained. The Harrier, after some thirteen years of operational service, has met the enemy, locked him in mortal combat, and come away the winner. Operating under severe winter weather conditions, in the rough wind swept South Atlantic seas off the Royal Navy assault carriers HMS Hermes and HMS Invincible, Royal Navy Sea Harriers engaged Argentine Air Force fighters, naval vessels and ground targets with great success. During these combat actions in the South Atlantic the Harrier, the worlds first operational Vertical/Short Take Off and Landing (V/STOL) jet fighter, has proven its worth. The road to success has been a long and hard one, a road that was paved with hard work, perseverance, disappointment and...

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No. 50 - B-26 Marauder in Action

Aircraft in Action Steve Birdsall

The initial 201 Marauders (the name was made official in October 1941) were classified B-26s, including the four test aircraft. The B-26 had a gross weight of 30,035 lbs, about a ton over design specs, and a top speed of 315mph. Maximum bomb load was 5800 lbs, only a ton short of a B-17's. The landing speed was about 130mph and take-off run in fully-loaded condition was 2500 ft. Almost immediately the Marauder began to pick up the reputation of being a killer, a reputation that would hound it throughout its career. On no less than four different occasions the Marauder's future would hang in the balance as a committee decided whether or not to scrap the whole B-26 program. Each time, however, the decision was reluctantly made to continue Marauder production, yet by war's end the Widow Maker would enjoy the enviable statistics of being the safest bomber that USAAF put into skies over Europe. One B-26. Flak-Bait, would fly more combat missions (202) than any other US medium bomber of...

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No. 50 - B-26 Marauder in Action

Aircraft in Action Steve Birdsall

The initial 201 Marauders (the name was made official in October 1941) were classified B-26s, including the four test aircraft. The B-26 had a gross weight of 30,035 lbs, about a ton over design specs, and a top speed of 315mph. Maximum bomb load was 5800 lbs, only a ton short of a B-17's. The landing speed was about 130mph and take-off run in fully-loaded condition was 2500 ft. Almost immediately the Marauder began to pick up the reputation of being a killer, a reputation that would hound it throughout its career. On no less than four different occasions the Marauder's future would hang in the balance as a committee decided whether or not to scrap the whole B-26 program. Each time, however, the decision was reluctantly made to continue Marauder production, yet by war's end the Widow Maker would enjoy the enviable statistics of being the safest bomber that USAAF put into skies over Europe. One B-26. Flak-Bait, would fly more combat missions (202) than any other US medium bomber of...

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No. 62 - PBY Catalina in Action

Aircraft in Action USN (Ret.) Captain W. E. Scarborough

In 1932, with P2Y deliveries underway, the Navy announced a design competition for a new patrol flying boat, specifying a performance envelope that would significantly extend fleet capabilities. The new P-boat was to have a 3,000 mile range at a cruising speed of 100 mph and a maximum gross weight of 25,000 lbs. - nearly twice that of the XPY-1. Mac Lad-don and the Consolidated engineering team welcomed the challenge of a new design effort, confident that the experience gained during the development of the P2Y and its record breaking performance in fleet operations assured a high probability of success for the new design. The results of their effort was a radical new seaplane, unique enough in design to qualify for a patent (No. 92912 in Mac Laddon's name was issued by the U.S. Patent Office on 31 July 1934). Following a preliminary review of the proposal, the Navy on 28 October 1933, awarded a contract to Consolidated for further development of the design and construction of a...

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No. 62 - PBY Catalina in Action

Aircraft in Action USN (Ret.) Captain W. E. Scarborough

In 1932, with P2Y deliveries underway, the Navy announced a design competition for a new patrol flying boat, specifying a performance envelope that would significantly extend fleet capabilities. The new P-boat was to have a 3,000 mile range at a cruising speed of 100 mph and a maximum gross weight of 25,000 lbs. - nearly twice that of the XPY-1. Mac Lad-don and the Consolidated engineering team welcomed the challenge of a new design effort, confident that the experience gained during the development of the P2Y and its record breaking performance in fleet operations assured a high probability of success for the new design. The results of their effort was a radical new seaplane, unique enough in design to qualify for a patent (No. 92912 in Mac Laddon's name was issued by the U.S. Patent Office on 31 July 1934). Following a preliminary review of the proposal, the Navy on 28 October 1933, awarded a contract to Consolidated for further development of the design and construction of a...

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No. 57 - Messerschmitt Bf 109 in Action, Part 2

Aircraft in Action Don Greer

During February three Bf 109F-1s crashed in unexplained circumstances killing their test pilots. Since two of the pilots had radioed that they were experiencing violent vibrations from the engine just before their aircraft crashed, the DB 601N engine was suspect and immediately all Bf 109Fs were grounded. However since the cause of the vibrations could not be ascertained and no similiar accidents were experienced in the like powered Bf 109E-4/N, the ban was lifted. Within weeks another F crashed after losing its tail. Investigation of the crash revealed only superficial damage to the engine, but nearly all of the rivets in the skin plating of the separated tail assembly had broken loose, and many rivets were missing. Investigators quickly found that the unbraced tail, at certain rpms, was subject to a high-frequency oscillation, which was overlapped by the engine vibration which set up sympathetic vibrations, which in turn caused a structural failure. Two external stiffener plates...

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No. 57 - Messerschmitt Bf 109 in Action, Part 2

Aircraft in Action Don Greer

During February three Bf 109F-1s crashed in unexplained circumstances killing their test pilots. Since two of the pilots had radioed that they were experiencing violent vibrations from the engine just before their aircraft crashed, the DB 601N engine was suspect and immediately all Bf 109Fs were grounded. However since the cause of the vibrations could not be ascertained and no similiar accidents were experienced in the like powered Bf 109E-4/N, the ban was lifted. Within weeks another F crashed after losing its tail. Investigation of the crash revealed only superficial damage to the engine, but nearly all of the rivets in the skin plating of the separated tail assembly had broken loose, and many rivets were missing. Investigators quickly found that the unbraced tail, at certain rpms, was subject to a high-frequency oscillation, which was overlapped by the engine vibration which set up sympathetic vibrations, which in turn caused a structural failure. Two external stiffener plates...

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No. 60 - AD Skyraider in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Sullivan

As a replacement for the obsolete SBD Dauntless, Douglas Aircraft Company at El Segundo developed the XSB2D Destroyer, a single engine two place dive bomber with the secondary capability of torpedo attack. Equipped with a tricycle landing gear, and inverted gull wings similar to the F4U Corsair, the Destroyer was armed with two 50 caliber machine guns mounted in each wing and three 50s mounted in remotely controlled aft turrets. Maximum bomb load was 4000 lbs., which was carried internally. However, while the two place Destroyer was under development, the Navy changed it's requirements from a two place SB (Scout Divebomber) to a single place BT (Divebomber Torpedo Attack). Douglas quickly went to work redesigning the XSB2D into a single seat aircraft under the designation XBTD-1. Unfortunately the inverted gull wing design proved to be impractical and the XBTD-1 project was cancelled in June of 1944.

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No. 60 - AD Skyraider in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Sullivan

As a replacement for the obsolete SBD Dauntless, Douglas Aircraft Company at El Segundo developed the XSB2D Destroyer, a single engine two place dive bomber with the secondary capability of torpedo attack. Equipped with a tricycle landing gear, and inverted gull wings similar to the F4U Corsair, the Destroyer was armed with two 50 caliber machine guns mounted in each wing and three 50s mounted in remotely controlled aft turrets. Maximum bomb load was 4000 lbs., which was carried internally. However, while the two place Destroyer was under development, the Navy changed it's requirements from a two place SB (Scout Divebomber) to a single place BT (Divebomber Torpedo Attack). Douglas quickly went to work redesigning the XSB2D into a single seat aircraft under the designation XBTD-1. Unfortunately the inverted gull wing design proved to be impractical and the XBTD-1 project was cancelled in June of 1944.

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No. 61 - F-84 Thunderjet in Action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

For example, the 27th FEGp arrived in Korea with F-84Ds and Es in December 1960. Their unit ID markings were a diagonal stripe on the vertical and horizontal stabilizer in the squadron color. Additionally, the nose ring and an added flash, plus an arrow on the outside of each wingtip tank, were also painted in the squadron color. When they were relieved in May 1951 by the 136th Fighter-Bomber Group, an activated Air National Guard unit, the 136th crews simply adopted the 27th Group markings as their own. and added a squadron insignia decal to some aircraft. When the 1 36th was returned to state control in July 1952. it was a paper transfer. The unit was simply renumbered the 58th Fighter Bomber Group. The aircraft. and many of the Air Guard crews remained in Korea. These crews added a simple Black trim line to all the existing markings, and removed the 136th unit decals. Now add to this the fact that both the 474th FBGp and 56th FBGp were part of the 58th FBWg, with aircraft being...

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No. 61 - F-84 Thunderjet in Action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

For example, the 27th FEGp arrived in Korea with F-84Ds and Es in December 1960. Their unit ID markings were a diagonal stripe on the vertical and horizontal stabilizer in the squadron color. Additionally, the nose ring and an added flash, plus an arrow on the outside of each wingtip tank, were also painted in the squadron color. When they were relieved in May 1951 by the 136th Fighter-Bomber Group, an activated Air National Guard unit, the 136th crews simply adopted the 27th Group markings as their own. and added a squadron insignia decal to some aircraft. When the 1 36th was returned to state control in July 1952. it was a paper transfer. The unit was simply renumbered the 58th Fighter Bomber Group. The aircraft. and many of the Air Guard crews remained in Korea. These crews added a simple Black trim line to all the existing markings, and removed the 136th unit decals. Now add to this the fact that both the 474th FBGp and 56th FBGp were part of the 58th FBWg, with aircraft being...

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No. 59 - A6M Zero in Action

Aircraft in Action Shigeru Nohara

One of the most important factors influencing the Japanese military leadership in making the fateful decision to attack the United States and plunge Japan into the abyss of a war encompassing nearly the whole of the Pacific Ocean was the performance of the Zero Fighter. At the time of its appearance, the Zero Fighter had a performance package far superior to any aircraft then in service or even on the drawing board of any other world power. Speed, range, rate of climb, maneuverability, and the ability to operate from aircraft carrier decks combined to forge a seemingly invincible weapon in the hands of the Japanese Navy. A weapon that could be the cutting edge on the sword that Japan could use to dominate the Pacific. This vision proved to be irresistible to the military leadership and on the morning of 8 December 1941 (Japanese time) an air assault led by Zero Fighters was launched against the United States Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor.

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No. 59 - A6M Zero in Action

Aircraft in Action Shigeru Nohara

One of the most important factors influencing the Japanese military leadership in making the fateful decision to attack the United States and plunge Japan into the abyss of a war encompassing nearly the whole of the Pacific Ocean was the performance of the Zero Fighter. At the time of its appearance, the Zero Fighter had a performance package far superior to any aircraft then in service or even on the drawing board of any other world power. Speed, range, rate of climb, maneuverability, and the ability to operate from aircraft carrier decks combined to forge a seemingly invincible weapon in the hands of the Japanese Navy. A weapon that could be the cutting edge on the sword that Japan could use to dominate the Pacific. This vision proved to be irresistible to the military leadership and on the morning of 8 December 1941 (Japanese time) an air assault led by Zero Fighters was launched against the United States Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor.

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No. 56 - A-20 Havoc in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Mesko

When the final blueprints were finished the new plane received the designation DB-7. which indicated Douglas Bomber 7th type. This was due to the fact that at this time there still was no order from the army so Douglas had no military nomenclature to use. However, within three months of the initial Prench order the army decided to place an order with Douglas and the official designation of A-20 was introduced. The use of this dual designation system caused some initial confusion In labeling the various models for each country. These designations were often interchanged in press reports and official releases which caused some contradiction as to who was using what. Eventually, this was ironed out but for the first two years of production and service the dual designation caused a good deal of ambiguity.

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No. 56 - A-20 Havoc in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Mesko

When the final blueprints were finished the new plane received the designation DB-7. which indicated Douglas Bomber 7th type. This was due to the fact that at this time there still was no order from the army so Douglas had no military nomenclature to use. However, within three months of the initial Prench order the army decided to place an order with Douglas and the official designation of A-20 was introduced. The use of this dual designation system caused some initial confusion In labeling the various models for each country. These designations were often interchanged in press reports and official releases which caused some contradiction as to who was using what. Eventually, this was ironed out but for the first two years of production and service the dual designation caused a good deal of ambiguity.

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No. 67 - P-47 Thunderbolt in Action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

As promising as the P-43 design was, Kartveli had an even better design known as the XP-44. Based on the P-43 design, the XP-44 had a lower cockpit and fully streamlined frontal area, including a full spinner that mated up to a very tightly cowled P&W R-2180 radial promising 1400 hp. When this engine design fell through, Kartveli opted for the most powerful aircraft engine in the world, the Pratt & Whitney XR-2800 "Double Wasp", which developed over 2000 hp from its 18 cylinders. Air Corps officers were so impressed with the initial design that an order for eighty XP-44 Warriors was placed before a single airframe had ever been built. However, after the fall of France to Hitler's Blitzkrieg, and the ensuing Battle of Britain, even the highly promising XP-44 was considered inferior to the competition in the skies over Europe. Both the Bf-109 and Spitfire were rated superior in every way to the XP-44 design. An entirely new aircraft was needed. But Republic needed money to...

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No. 67 - P-47 Thunderbolt in Action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

As promising as the P-43 design was, Kartveli had an even better design known as the XP-44. Based on the P-43 design, the XP-44 had a lower cockpit and fully streamlined frontal area, including a full spinner that mated up to a very tightly cowled P&W R-2180 radial promising 1400 hp. When this engine design fell through, Kartveli opted for the most powerful aircraft engine in the world, the Pratt & Whitney XR-2800 "Double Wasp", which developed over 2000 hp from its 18 cylinders. Air Corps officers were so impressed with the initial design that an order for eighty XP-44 Warriors was placed before a single airframe had ever been built. However, after the fall of France to Hitler's Blitzkrieg, and the ensuing Battle of Britain, even the highly promising XP-44 was considered inferior to the competition in the skies over Europe. Both the Bf-109 and Spitfire were rated superior in every way to the XP-44 design. An entirely new aircraft was needed. But Republic needed money to...

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No. 64 - SBD Dauntless in Action

Aircraft in Action Robert Stern

The Douglas SBD Dauntless, the Slow But Deadly Dauntless, was easily the most famous US Navy bomber of World War II, and possibly the most important dive bomber flown by any combatant during World War II. However, the Dauntless had begun its combat career as a mediocre dive bomber that was already considered obsolete even before the United States entered the war. Obsolescence not with standing, the Dauntless was the only US aircraft to participate in all five Naval engagements that were fought exclusively between aircraft carriers, and despite having been marked for retirement even before the war began, the Dauntless sunk more enemy shipping during 1942 than all other aircraft combined; the Slow But Deadly destroyed the cream of the Japanese aircraft carrier fleet during the Battle of Midway, a blow from which the Imperial Japanese Navy never recovered. "Certainly by the time the Helldiver appeared on the scene the main decisive carrier-to-carrier air/sea battles had been fought...

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No. 64 - SBD Dauntless in Action

Aircraft in Action Robert Stern

The Douglas SBD Dauntless, the Slow But Deadly Dauntless, was easily the most famous US Navy bomber of World War II, and possibly the most important dive bomber flown by any combatant during World War II. However, the Dauntless had begun its combat career as a mediocre dive bomber that was already considered obsolete even before the United States entered the war. Obsolescence not with standing, the Dauntless was the only US aircraft to participate in all five Naval engagements that were fought exclusively between aircraft carriers, and despite having been marked for retirement even before the war began, the Dauntless sunk more enemy shipping during 1942 than all other aircraft combined; the Slow But Deadly destroyed the cream of the Japanese aircraft carrier fleet during the Battle of Midway, a blow from which the Imperial Japanese Navy never recovered. "Certainly by the time the Helldiver appeared on the scene the main decisive carrier-to-carrier air/sea battles had been fought...

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No. 65 - F-4 Phantom II in action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

The F4H-1 Phantom II was the first production variant (aircraft No. 24 to 47). The F4H-1 production aircraft differed from the earlier F4H-1F preproduction aircraft mainly in the engine department. The F4H-1 was powered by the General Electric J79-GE-8, rated at 17,000 lbs. of thrust in afterburner. This was an increase of 850 lbs. of thrust over the -2A engine in the early F4H-1F. The -8 engine allowed the gross takeoff weight to climb to an amazing 56,000 lbs. The F4H-1 was equipped with the same Aero-1 A fire control system as the preproduction F4H-1F. The F4H-1 had five external hard points for carrying fuel tanks and ordnance, plus the four recesses in the underside of the fuselage for Sparrow III missiles. Other electronics included the General Electric ASA-32 autopilot, Lear AJB-3/3A bombing system, and the ACF AAA-4 infra-red detector under the nose. Experience in the Vietnam War would see the addition of the APR-30 Radar Homing and Warning System in a small bullet-shaped...

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No. 65 - F-4 Phantom II in action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

The F4H-1 Phantom II was the first production variant (aircraft No. 24 to 47). The F4H-1 production aircraft differed from the earlier F4H-1F preproduction aircraft mainly in the engine department. The F4H-1 was powered by the General Electric J79-GE-8, rated at 17,000 lbs. of thrust in afterburner. This was an increase of 850 lbs. of thrust over the -2A engine in the early F4H-1F. The -8 engine allowed the gross takeoff weight to climb to an amazing 56,000 lbs. The F4H-1 was equipped with the same Aero-1 A fire control system as the preproduction F4H-1F. The F4H-1 had five external hard points for carrying fuel tanks and ordnance, plus the four recesses in the underside of the fuselage for Sparrow III missiles. Other electronics included the General Electric ASA-32 autopilot, Lear AJB-3/3A bombing system, and the ACF AAA-4 infra-red detector under the nose. Experience in the Vietnam War would see the addition of the APR-30 Radar Homing and Warning System in a small bullet-shaped...

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No. 70 - F-8 Crusader in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Sullivan

With few changes from the prototype, the Chance Vought F8U-1 Crusader began to roll off the Dallas assembly line, with the first production aircraft flying on 30 September of 1955 only some twenty-seven months after the contract was awarded to Vought and only Six months after the prototype flew for the first time. After the first thirty F8U-1 Crusaders produced the Pratt and Whitney J57-P-12 engine was replaced with the more powerful Pratt and Whitney J57-P-4A engine providing a dry thrust of 10,900 pounds and 16,600 pounds in afterburner. The original thirty F8U-1 aircraft were later retrofitted with the more powerful engine. The new engine allowed the Crusader to operate at altitudes near 50,000 feet and at speeds in excess of MACH 1.5

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No. 70 - F-8 Crusader in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Sullivan

With few changes from the prototype, the Chance Vought F8U-1 Crusader began to roll off the Dallas assembly line, with the first production aircraft flying on 30 September of 1955 only some twenty-seven months after the contract was awarded to Vought and only Six months after the prototype flew for the first time. After the first thirty F8U-1 Crusaders produced the Pratt and Whitney J57-P-12 engine was replaced with the more powerful Pratt and Whitney J57-P-4A engine providing a dry thrust of 10,900 pounds and 16,600 pounds in afterburner. The original thirty F8U-1 aircraft were later retrofitted with the more powerful engine. The new engine allowed the Crusader to operate at altitudes near 50,000 feet and at speeds in excess of MACH 1.5

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No. 69 - S.E.5a in action

Aircraft in Action John F. Connors

In March of 1917 a Preliminary Performance Report by the official testing unit at Martlesham Heath was made on A4845, the first production S.E.5. which stated that: Lateral control was insufficient, especially at low speeds; hence the machine maneuvered poorly, and was almost uncontrollable below 70 mph in gusts, causing a crash on take off. The report further suggested that aileron control be geared higher. As a result of this report aircraft of the second S.E.5 production batch were modified by having wings of a shorter span (26 ft 4 In) and wing tips with much less rake, which provided additional aileron control at lower speeds. The second production batch of S.E.5s were also fitted with horizontal shutters on the upper portion of the radiator. Forty-seven S.E.5s were completed in the second production batch, all by the Royal Aircraft Factory, although the last seven machines were powered by 200 hp engines and were regarded as early S.E.5as. The type remained in service until at...

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No. 69 - S.E.5a in action

Aircraft in Action John F. Connors

In March of 1917 a Preliminary Performance Report by the official testing unit at Martlesham Heath was made on A4845, the first production S.E.5. which stated that: Lateral control was insufficient, especially at low speeds; hence the machine maneuvered poorly, and was almost uncontrollable below 70 mph in gusts, causing a crash on take off. The report further suggested that aileron control be geared higher. As a result of this report aircraft of the second S.E.5 production batch were modified by having wings of a shorter span (26 ft 4 In) and wing tips with much less rake, which provided additional aileron control at lower speeds. The second production batch of S.E.5s were also fitted with horizontal shutters on the upper portion of the radiator. Forty-seven S.E.5s were completed in the second production batch, all by the Royal Aircraft Factory, although the last seven machines were powered by 200 hp engines and were regarded as early S.E.5as. The type remained in service until at...

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No. 68 - P2V Neptune in action

Aircraft in Action Jim Sullivan

The initial production variant, the Model 26 P2V-1 Neptune, differed little from the prototype. Its mission was that of a land-based, anti-submarine/anti-surface vessel patrol aircraft. The P2V-1, the same as the prototype, was powered by a pair of Wright Cyclone R-3350-8 engines turning four bladed props and producing 2,300hp each at take off. Empty weight was 33,720lbs with a gross weight of 61,153lbs which included a crew of eight. The P2V-1 had the capability of carrying an 8,000lb combination of bombs, mines, depth charges, or two 2,1651b torpedoes in the huge bomb bay. Armament and search radar equipment were identical to the XP2V-1 with a slightly larger under-fuselage radome. The dorsal fairing running from the tail to the turret and the small fairing in front of the turret were removed, and the turret was lowered slightly into the fuselage reducing its profile and drag. Delivery of the first production aircraft for flight testing and evaluation took place early in 1946....

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No. 91 - CH-47 Chinook in action

Aircraft in Action Wayne Mutza

xperience gained with the CH-47A under combat conditions in Vietnam led the Army to consider changes to the aircraft to give it greater lift and performance under tropical conditions. One of the five pre-production YHC-1Bs (s/n 59-4984) was re-engincd with two 2,850 shp T55-L-7C turbine engines fitted with modified rotor blades, becoming the prototype for an improved CH-47 under the designation YCH-47B. The modifications to the YCH-47B included a redesigned rotor system with new blades that featured cambered leading edges. The forward blades were slightly longer than on the CH-47 A, with the front rotor arc being increased from 59 feet 1.25 inches to 60 feet. The new blades were also stronger and featured a Strengthened steel main spar and honeycomb trailing edges, in place of the of the aluminum main spar and fiberglass trailing edges used on the CH-47 A.

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No. 91 - CH-47 Chinook in action

Aircraft in Action Wayne Mutza

xperience gained with the CH-47A under combat conditions in Vietnam led the Army to consider changes to the aircraft to give it greater lift and performance under tropical conditions. One of the five pre-production YHC-1Bs (s/n 59-4984) was re-engincd with two 2,850 shp T55-L-7C turbine engines fitted with modified rotor blades, becoming the prototype for an improved CH-47 under the designation YCH-47B. The modifications to the YCH-47B included a redesigned rotor system with new blades that featured cambered leading edges. The forward blades were slightly longer than on the CH-47 A, with the front rotor arc being increased from 59 feet 1.25 inches to 60 feet. The new blades were also stronger and featured a Strengthened steel main spar and honeycomb trailing edges, in place of the of the aluminum main spar and fiberglass trailing edges used on the CH-47 A.

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No. 90 - Sukhoi Fitters in Action

Aircraft in Action Hans-Heiri Stapfer

The Su-7 Fitter is a dedicated ground attack fighter designed and built by the Sukhoi Design Bureau (OKB), one of the primary OKBs in the Soviet Union. Over the past th rty years. the Fitter series has emerged as one of the most successful aircraft built in the Soviet Union since the end of the Second World War. Currently,more then half of all tactical ground-attack fighter regiments in the Soviet Union and Warsaw Pact are equipped with one or more Sukhoi Fitter variants. This impressive aircraft flew for the first time during the mid-1950s and is considered to be an Eastern contemporary of the North American F-100 Super Sabre. While the Super Sabre has long since been retired, the Sukhoi Su-17 and Su-22, both progressive developments of the basic Su-7 (Fitter A), are the backbone of tactical airpower in the Eastern nations. The Fitter series is a fine example of the Russian method of progressively upgrading a proven aircraft over a long period of time. The Su-22 Fitter) also has...

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No. 90 - Sukhoi Fitters in Action

Aircraft in Action Hans-Heiri Stapfer

The Su-7 Fitter is a dedicated ground attack fighter designed and built by the Sukhoi Design Bureau (OKB), one of the primary OKBs in the Soviet Union. Over the past th rty years. the Fitter series has emerged as one of the most successful aircraft built in the Soviet Union since the end of the Second World War. Currently,more then half of all tactical ground-attack fighter regiments in the Soviet Union and Warsaw Pact are equipped with one or more Sukhoi Fitter variants. This impressive aircraft flew for the first time during the mid-1950s and is considered to be an Eastern contemporary of the North American F-100 Super Sabre. While the Super Sabre has long since been retired, the Sukhoi Su-17 and Su-22, both progressive developments of the basic Su-7 (Fitter A), are the backbone of tactical airpower in the Eastern nations. The Fitter series is a fine example of the Russian method of progressively upgrading a proven aircraft over a long period of time. The Su-22 Fitter) also has...

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No. 95 - AH-64 Apache in action

Aircraft in Action Al Adcock

The AH-64 Apache is the latest in a long line of armed rotary wing aircraft that dates back to the Second World War when the Focke-Achgelis Fa 223 was armed with a 7.7mm MG 15 machine gun. Early helicopters were envisioned for use in the search and rescue role where they were likely to encounter the enemy and armament was included for self defense. It wasn't until the Korean War (1950-1953) that serious consideration was given to using the helicopter as an offensive platform armed with guns and rockets. The Bell H-13 was the first American helicopter to be armed with machine guns for self defense. Later, Sikorsky H-34s and Piasecki H-21s were armed with rockets as well as guns and this practice led to the beginnings of the true armed attack helicopter. During 1954, the U.S. Army, based on its experience in the Korean War, saw the need for a dedicated armed helicopter that could escort troop-carrying helicopters and could suppress enemy ground fire. The armed helicopter would also...

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No. 95 - AH-64 Apache in action

Aircraft in Action Al Adcock

The AH-64 Apache is the latest in a long line of armed rotary wing aircraft that dates back to the Second World War when the Focke-Achgelis Fa 223 was armed with a 7.7mm MG 15 machine gun. Early helicopters were envisioned for use in the search and rescue role where they were likely to encounter the enemy and armament was included for self defense. It wasn't until the Korean War (1950-1953) that serious consideration was given to using the helicopter as an offensive platform armed with guns and rockets. The Bell H-13 was the first American helicopter to be armed with machine guns for self defense. Later, Sikorsky H-34s and Piasecki H-21s were armed with rockets as well as guns and this practice led to the beginnings of the true armed attack helicopter. During 1954, the U.S. Army, based on its experience in the Korean War, saw the need for a dedicated armed helicopter that could escort troop-carrying helicopters and could suppress enemy ground fire. The armed helicopter would also...

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No. 94 - T-6 Texan in action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

Whether you called it the Texan, Harvard, Yale, J-Bird, Mosquito, or simply the T-6. the North American T-6 trainer was one of the most important aircraft designs of the Second World War era — perhaps of all time. The North American Texan was built in greater numbers than most of the aircraft that it trained pilots for, or against! There were 17,096 Texans built by North American Aviation and the foreign companies that built the Texan under license overseas. This figure does not count the aircraft that were re-manufactured from existing airframes, or aircraft that used T-6 technology (P-64, NA-50. Boomerang) as their basis. Although designed as a basic training aircraft, the T-6 would be used extensively in a number of other roles including: advanced trainer, fighter, interceptor, fighter-bomber, forward air control aircraft, and counter-insurgency (COIN) aircraft. The Texan was widely exported and served with at least fifty-five air forces throughout the world. In civilian hands...

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No. 94 - T-6 Texan in action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

Whether you called it the Texan, Harvard, Yale, J-Bird, Mosquito, or simply the T-6. the North American T-6 trainer was one of the most important aircraft designs of the Second World War era — perhaps of all time. The North American Texan was built in greater numbers than most of the aircraft that it trained pilots for, or against! There were 17,096 Texans built by North American Aviation and the foreign companies that built the Texan under license overseas. This figure does not count the aircraft that were re-manufactured from existing airframes, or aircraft that used T-6 technology (P-64, NA-50. Boomerang) as their basis. Although designed as a basic training aircraft, the T-6 would be used extensively in a number of other roles including: advanced trainer, fighter, interceptor, fighter-bomber, forward air control aircraft, and counter-insurgency (COIN) aircraft. The Texan was widely exported and served with at least fifty-five air forces throughout the world. In civilian hands...

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No. 97 - TBD Devastator in action

Aircraft in Action Al Adcock

During 1934, the U.S. Navy's aircraft carrier force was comprised of three carriers, USS LEXINGTON (CV-2), USS SARATOGA (CV-3), and USS RANGER (CV-4), with the air groups aboard these ships being equipped with biplane fighters, scouts, and torpedo bombers. During this time the Navy was beginning a massive expansion program and had four new aircraft carriers either under construction or on the drawing boards. These ships, USS YORKTOWN (CV-5), USS ENTERPRISE (CV-6), USS WASP (CV-7), and USS HORNET (CV-8), were all scheduled to be fully operational by 1941. To outfit the air groups aboard these new ships, the Navy sought proposals from the American aviation industry for new and improved aircraft.

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No. 97 - TBD Devastator in action

Aircraft in Action Al Adcock

During 1934, the U.S. Navy's aircraft carrier force was comprised of three carriers, USS LEXINGTON (CV-2), USS SARATOGA (CV-3), and USS RANGER (CV-4), with the air groups aboard these ships being equipped with biplane fighters, scouts, and torpedo bombers. During this time the Navy was beginning a massive expansion program and had four new aircraft carriers either under construction or on the drawing boards. These ships, USS YORKTOWN (CV-5), USS ENTERPRISE (CV-6), USS WASP (CV-7), and USS HORNET (CV-8), were all scheduled to be fully operational by 1941. To outfit the air groups aboard these new ships, the Navy sought proposals from the American aviation industry for new and improved aircraft.

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No. 93 - Spad Fighters in action

Aircraft in Action John F. Connors

One of the most illustrious names in French aviation during the years just prior to the First World War was that of Armand Deperdussin, a wealthy French industrialist who had realized that aviation had great potential for business. During 1910 he formed the Societe Provisoire des Aeroplanes Deperdussin. According to customary French business practice, the aircraft produced by this firm could have been referred lo as SPADS, an acronym composed of the initials of the company. During the company's early years, however, aircraft built by the firm were called simply, Deperdussins. These included the Deperdussin monoplane racers which exhibited very advanced streamlining for their day and won the Gordon Bennet Trophy for France during 1913. During that race a Deperdussin, flown by Maurice Prevost, attained a speed of 125 mph.

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No. 93 - Spad Fighters in action

Aircraft in Action John F. Connors

One of the most illustrious names in French aviation during the years just prior to the First World War was that of Armand Deperdussin, a wealthy French industrialist who had realized that aviation had great potential for business. During 1910 he formed the Societe Provisoire des Aeroplanes Deperdussin. According to customary French business practice, the aircraft produced by this firm could have been referred lo as SPADS, an acronym composed of the initials of the company. During the company's early years, however, aircraft built by the firm were called simply, Deperdussins. These included the Deperdussin monoplane racers which exhibited very advanced streamlining for their day and won the Gordon Bennet Trophy for France during 1913. During that race a Deperdussin, flown by Maurice Prevost, attained a speed of 125 mph.

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No. 98 - Fokker Dr.I in action

Aircraft in Action Heinz J. Nowarra

On 15 July 1917 Manfred von Richthofen, commander of Jagdgeschwader, recovering sufficiently from his head injury received in an early combat, left the hospital, together with LT Kurt Wolff, and returned to his unit. During his talks with the pilots of Jastas 4,6, 10 and 11 he said, "You will soon be receiving new Fokker triplanes. They climb like monkeys and maneuver like devils." This was the first time many of the pilots had heard of the radical new fighter that they would soon be flying — the Fokker Dr. I. Prior to this time the German Army Air Service was flying aircraft built primarily by Albatros. Albatros. which had its great success with the Albatros D. I and D. II during 1916. had experienced trouble in producing a new development of these single seat fighters. Thelen and Schubert, who were responsible for design and construction of Albatros fighters, had created the D. III as the German answer to the French Nieuport 11 and 17. The aircraft, however, suffered from...

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No. 98 - Fokker Dr.I in action

Aircraft in Action Heinz J. Nowarra

On 15 July 1917 Manfred von Richthofen, commander of Jagdgeschwader, recovering sufficiently from his head injury received in an early combat, left the hospital, together with LT Kurt Wolff, and returned to his unit. During his talks with the pilots of Jastas 4,6, 10 and 11 he said, "You will soon be receiving new Fokker triplanes. They climb like monkeys and maneuver like devils." This was the first time many of the pilots had heard of the radical new fighter that they would soon be flying — the Fokker Dr. I. Prior to this time the German Army Air Service was flying aircraft built primarily by Albatros. Albatros. which had its great success with the Albatros D. I and D. II during 1916. had experienced trouble in producing a new development of these single seat fighters. Thelen and Schubert, who were responsible for design and construction of Albatros fighters, had created the D. III as the German answer to the French Nieuport 11 and 17. The aircraft, however, suffered from...

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No. 96 - Short Stirling in Action

Aircraft in Action Ron MacKay

Stirling Mk I N3663 was the first Series 111 aircraft and tests with this aircraft revealed that the Series III aircraft had a maximum speed of 255 mph at 10,000 feet and 230mph at 16,000 feet (with supercharging) while at a maximum weight of 70,000 pounds. The crew complement of the Mk I Scries III was seven; two pilots, navigator/bomb-aimer, wireless operator, two gunners and flight engineer. Later in the war the navigator/ bomb-aimer duties were split, at which point Stirling crews rose to eight The Stirling Mk I had a series of oval windows mounted in the sides of the fuselage. Four windows were located on the port side, and five on the starboard side of the nose area, with another eight on the starboard and nine on the port fuselage sides running from the wing spar to the horizontal stabilizer.

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No. 96 - Short Stirling in Action

Aircraft in Action Ron MacKay

Stirling Mk I N3663 was the first Series 111 aircraft and tests with this aircraft revealed that the Series III aircraft had a maximum speed of 255 mph at 10,000 feet and 230mph at 16,000 feet (with supercharging) while at a maximum weight of 70,000 pounds. The crew complement of the Mk I Scries III was seven; two pilots, navigator/bomb-aimer, wireless operator, two gunners and flight engineer. Later in the war the navigator/ bomb-aimer duties were split, at which point Stirling crews rose to eight The Stirling Mk I had a series of oval windows mounted in the sides of the fuselage. Four windows were located on the port side, and five on the starboard side of the nose area, with another eight on the starboard and nine on the port fuselage sides running from the wing spar to the horizontal stabilizer.

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No. 99 - F8F Bearcat in Action

Aircraft in Action Charles L. Scrivner

During 1943, Grumman was producing large numbers of F6F-3 Hellcats for service in the Pacific; however, both Grumman and the Navy realized that, although the F6F was the answer to the Navy's immediate needs, a successor with even higher performance would be required if the war continued. Both Boeing and Curtiss had proposed fighter designs to replace the Hellcat that were both larger and heavier than the F6F. Boeing had submitted the XF8B-1. while the entry from Curtiss was designated the XF14C-I. During this same time, Grumman engineering test pilot Bob Hall was sent to England to test fly and evaluate a captured German Focke Wulf 190 fighter. He was so impressed with the lightweight German fighter that he hurried back to report to Leroy (Roy) Grumman, founder and president of Grumman.

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No. 99 - F8F Bearcat in Action

Aircraft in Action Charles L. Scrivner

During 1943, Grumman was producing large numbers of F6F-3 Hellcats for service in the Pacific; however, both Grumman and the Navy realized that, although the F6F was the answer to the Navy's immediate needs, a successor with even higher performance would be required if the war continued. Both Boeing and Curtiss had proposed fighter designs to replace the Hellcat that were both larger and heavier than the F6F. Boeing had submitted the XF8B-1. while the entry from Curtiss was designated the XF14C-I. During this same time, Grumman engineering test pilot Bob Hall was sent to England to test fly and evaluate a captured German Focke Wulf 190 fighter. He was so impressed with the lightweight German fighter that he hurried back to report to Leroy (Roy) Grumman, founder and president of Grumman.

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No. 103 - FJ Fury in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Mesko

The German introduction of jet fighters into combat during the later stages of the Second World War was viewed by the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps as a threat to their air superiority in the Pacific. The Navy felt that Japan, with German technical assistance. might introduce jet fighters into the combat zone. To counter this possible threat, the Navy issued a requirement fora carrier based jet fighter. As a result of this requirement, a request for proposals was formulated by the Bureau of Aeronautics (BuAir) and sent to a number of aircraft companies. From the companies submitting proposals in response to the Navy's request, BuAir selected three for further development. Three different companies were selected, because the Navy felt that there was a need to provide for a backup against the possible failure of one or more of the designs. Jet technology was still in its very early stages and each new design broke new ground and had high risks. The Navy felt that it could not take a...

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No. 103 - FJ Fury in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Mesko

The German introduction of jet fighters into combat during the later stages of the Second World War was viewed by the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps as a threat to their air superiority in the Pacific. The Navy felt that Japan, with German technical assistance. might introduce jet fighters into the combat zone. To counter this possible threat, the Navy issued a requirement fora carrier based jet fighter. As a result of this requirement, a request for proposals was formulated by the Bureau of Aeronautics (BuAir) and sent to a number of aircraft companies. From the companies submitting proposals in response to the Navy's request, BuAir selected three for further development. Three different companies were selected, because the Navy felt that there was a need to provide for a backup against the possible failure of one or more of the designs. Jet technology was still in its very early stages and each new design broke new ground and had high risks. The Navy felt that it could not take a...

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No. 109 - P-38 Lightning in Action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

Der Gabelschwan: Teuful (The Fork-tailed Devil) was the most recognizable fighter aircraft of the Second World War. With its twin engines housed in long streamlined nacelles and booms. twin tails and center fuselage pod housing the pilot. few could mistake the Lockheed P-38 Lightning for any other aircraft. When it was introduced during 1939. the Lockheed design immediately made every other fighter aircraft obsolete. The P-38 was the first fighter to feature a tricycle landing gear, first with an all-metal flush riveted skin, first With power-boosted controls, and the first turbo.supercharged fighter aircraft to enter squadron service. At the time it was the fastest and longest ranged fighter in the world. With all these firsts,one would think that the P-38 should have been the premier fighter of the Second World War. In the Pacific Theater of Operations it was. But a host of technical problems resulting from its high performance. combined with logistical politics within the U.S....

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No. 109 - P-38 Lightning in Action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

Der Gabelschwan: Teuful (The Fork-tailed Devil) was the most recognizable fighter aircraft of the Second World War. With its twin engines housed in long streamlined nacelles and booms. twin tails and center fuselage pod housing the pilot. few could mistake the Lockheed P-38 Lightning for any other aircraft. When it was introduced during 1939. the Lockheed design immediately made every other fighter aircraft obsolete. The P-38 was the first fighter to feature a tricycle landing gear, first with an all-metal flush riveted skin, first With power-boosted controls, and the first turbo.supercharged fighter aircraft to enter squadron service. At the time it was the fastest and longest ranged fighter in the world. With all these firsts,one would think that the P-38 should have been the premier fighter of the Second World War. In the Pacific Theater of Operations it was. But a host of technical problems resulting from its high performance. combined with logistical politics within the U.S....

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No. 108 - Tu-16 Badger in Action

Aircraft in Action Robert Bock

On 27 October 1937, agents of the infamous NKVD arrested Andrey Nikoayevich Tupolev on the charge of being a "Class Enemy" who had provided Willy Messerschmitt with plans for an aircraft quite similar to the Bf-110. At the same time a group of other aviation designers and engineers including V. Petlakov, V. Myasishchev and A. Putilov were also arrested and put into Butyrka Prison. Tupolev spent almost a year in prison till Lavrentii Beria recalled that there were a large number of aviation designers/engineers in prison and/or labor camps. Beria envisioned the establishment of a special Design Bureau designated the TsKB-29 NKVD using the talents of these prisoners. The bureau was also called Spetstekhordel, or Special Technical Detachment. Later the name was once more changed to STO (from the Russian word for One Hundred). As a result, aircraft designed by the Bureau were designated 100, 102, 103, 110, etc. Among the 150 members of this design bureau were six future members of the...

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No. 108 - Tu-16 Badger in Action

Aircraft in Action Robert Bock

On 27 October 1937, agents of the infamous NKVD arrested Andrey Nikoayevich Tupolev on the charge of being a "Class Enemy" who had provided Willy Messerschmitt with plans for an aircraft quite similar to the Bf-110. At the same time a group of other aviation designers and engineers including V. Petlakov, V. Myasishchev and A. Putilov were also arrested and put into Butyrka Prison. Tupolev spent almost a year in prison till Lavrentii Beria recalled that there were a large number of aviation designers/engineers in prison and/or labor camps. Beria envisioned the establishment of a special Design Bureau designated the TsKB-29 NKVD using the talents of these prisoners. The bureau was also called Spetstekhordel, or Special Technical Detachment. Later the name was once more changed to STO (from the Russian word for One Hundred). As a result, aircraft designed by the Bureau were designated 100, 102, 103, 110, etc. Among the 150 members of this design bureau were six future members of the...

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No. 107 - T-34 Mentor in Action

Aircraft in Action Lou Drendel

Beech used the A-35 Bonanza as a starting point and began work on the trainer design under the company designation, Model 45. Several different models were built, including one with a V-tail, similar to the Bonanza. Although the V-tail worked well, Beech felt that the conservative military would prefer a conventional tail and that is what emerged on the final design. The same basic wing, landing gear, and some fuselage parts from Bonanzas were used to build three proof of concept aircraft, which were built as a private venture and completed during 1948. The first two were powered by 205 hp Continental E-185-8 engines, while the third prototype had a more powerful 225 hp E-225-8 engine. Company test pilot Vern Carstens made the first flight on 2 December 1948. The company prototypes were then shown to the Air Force, which ordered production of three military service test aircraft under the designation YT-34.

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No. 106 - P-61 Black Widow in Action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

The Northrop P-61 Black Widow was the only American aircraft designed as a night-fighter to be produced during the Second World War. The Black Widow proved to be a deadly night-fighter in combat against both the Germans and Japanese. The P-61 was designed by John (Jack) Knudson Northrop, who was one of the most farsighted aviation engineers of all time. His aircraft were innovative and usually ahead of their time. This is highlighted by the fact that the Northrop B-2 Stealth Bomber can trace its development back to the Northrop Flying Wings of the 1930s and 1940s. Northrop Aircraft Inc. was formed during August of 1939 with Jack Northrop as President and Chief Engineer. Within a year, Northrop had moved his company into a new 122,000 square foot plant at Hawthorne, California, and was employing over 100 people. At first, Northrop did subcontract work for other manufacturers — tail sections for PBY Catalinas and engine nacelles for B-17s. Additionally, Northrop built the Vultee...

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No. 106 - P-61 Black Widow in Action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

The Northrop P-61 Black Widow was the only American aircraft designed as a night-fighter to be produced during the Second World War. The Black Widow proved to be a deadly night-fighter in combat against both the Germans and Japanese. The P-61 was designed by John (Jack) Knudson Northrop, who was one of the most farsighted aviation engineers of all time. His aircraft were innovative and usually ahead of their time. This is highlighted by the fact that the Northrop B-2 Stealth Bomber can trace its development back to the Northrop Flying Wings of the 1930s and 1940s. Northrop Aircraft Inc. was formed during August of 1939 with Jack Northrop as President and Chief Engineer. Within a year, Northrop had moved his company into a new 122,000 square foot plant at Hawthorne, California, and was employing over 100 people. At first, Northrop did subcontract work for other manufacturers — tail sections for PBY Catalinas and engine nacelles for B-17s. Additionally, Northrop built the Vultee...

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No. 105 - F-14 Tomcat in Action

Aircraft in Action Al Adcock

Since the earliest days of carrier aviation. air cover for the fleet has been provided by air superiority fighters. a great number of which have been built by the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. Grumman was formed on 6 December 1928, with total capital of $64,000,00.The company was founded by Leroy Randle Grumman and five other aeronautical engineers and businessmen.Their early designs were innovative and included the first military aircraft with retractable landing gear and the first military float plane with its own retractable landing gear (creating a new class of aircraft— the amphibian). Grumman's design for the folding wing (later to be called the sto-wing) that reduced the span of the folded wing to that of the horizontal stabilizer, made it possible to carry more aircraft on a carrier.These and other innovations placed Grumman in the forefront of U.S. Navy aircraft production during the 1930s. When the Second World War began. Grumman shifted to full scale war...

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No. 105 - F-14 Tomcat in Action

Aircraft in Action Al Adcock

Since the earliest days of carrier aviation. air cover for the fleet has been provided by air superiority fighters. a great number of which have been built by the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. Grumman was formed on 6 December 1928, with total capital of $64,000,00.The company was founded by Leroy Randle Grumman and five other aeronautical engineers and businessmen.Their early designs were innovative and included the first military aircraft with retractable landing gear and the first military float plane with its own retractable landing gear (creating a new class of aircraft— the amphibian). Grumman's design for the folding wing (later to be called the sto-wing) that reduced the span of the folded wing to that of the horizontal stabilizer, made it possible to carry more aircraft on a carrier.These and other innovations placed Grumman in the forefront of U.S. Navy aircraft production during the 1930s. When the Second World War began. Grumman shifted to full scale war...

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No. 104 - F-89 Scorpion in Action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

The Northrop F-89 Scorpion was one of the most heavily armed fighter aircraft in history and one of Jack Northrop's last designs. The F-89 was the backbone of the North American Air Defense Command and defended the continental United States for over seventeen years, equipping thirty-nine Air Force squadrons. Scorpions were stationed from Maine to Alaska, as well as serving with units in Greenland and Iceland. The F-89 was the first aircraft designed to carry an all-rocket armament, the first operational aircraft to be armed with the Hughes Falcon air-to-air guided missile, and the first nuclear-armed interceptor. Although the F-89 never fired a shot in anger, it was a major deterrent to a Soviet attack during the Cold War of the 1950s.

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No. 104 - F-89 Scorpion in Action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

The Northrop F-89 Scorpion was one of the most heavily armed fighter aircraft in history and one of Jack Northrop's last designs. The F-89 was the backbone of the North American Air Defense Command and defended the continental United States for over seventeen years, equipping thirty-nine Air Force squadrons. Scorpions were stationed from Maine to Alaska, as well as serving with units in Greenland and Iceland. The F-89 was the first aircraft designed to carry an all-rocket armament, the first operational aircraft to be armed with the Hughes Falcon air-to-air guided missile, and the first nuclear-armed interceptor. Although the F-89 never fired a shot in anger, it was a major deterrent to a Soviet attack during the Cold War of the 1950s.

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No. 100 - S2F Tracker in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Sullivan

The Second World War had demonstrated the tremendous destructive power of unrestricted submarine warfare and the need for specialized aircraft to combat this threat to the safe movement of men and supplies to the war fronts. The U.S. Navy successfully fought the U-Boat war and emerged from World War II with the most powerful Naval Air Force in the world. During the late 1940s and early 1950s, U.S. Naval strategy on Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)centered around the Hunter-Killer aircraft concept. Acting as a team, the Hunter aircraft would locate the target and the Killer aircraft would destroy it. The tirst aircraft types used for this mission were the TBM-3W (Hunter) and TBM-3S (Killer): both of which were derived from the Grumman Avenger torpedo bomber. During the 1950s. the Avenger A.SW was was replaced by thc Grumman-built AF Guardian the largest, single engine aircraft to serve in the U.S. Navy. The Guardian was also used in the Hunter-Killer concept utilizing two variants, the...

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No. 100 - S2F Tracker in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Sullivan

The Second World War had demonstrated the tremendous destructive power of unrestricted submarine warfare and the need for specialized aircraft to combat this threat to the safe movement of men and supplies to the war fronts. The U.S. Navy successfully fought the U-Boat war and emerged from World War II with the most powerful Naval Air Force in the world. During the late 1940s and early 1950s, U.S. Naval strategy on Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)centered around the Hunter-Killer aircraft concept. Acting as a team, the Hunter aircraft would locate the target and the Killer aircraft would destroy it. The tirst aircraft types used for this mission were the TBM-3W (Hunter) and TBM-3S (Killer): both of which were derived from the Grumman Avenger torpedo bomber. During the 1950s. the Avenger A.SW was was replaced by thc Grumman-built AF Guardian the largest, single engine aircraft to serve in the U.S. Navy. The Guardian was also used in the Hunter-Killer concept utilizing two variants, the...

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No. 116 - MiG-15 in action

Aircraft in Action Hans-Heiri Stapfer

During November of 1950. United Nations fighter pilots over North Korea encountered a formidable swept-wing high performance jet fighter. which was quickly identified as the Soviet-built MiG-15. Almost overnight the name MiG became infamous inthe West, as Sabres and MiG-15s clashed over "MiG Alley." The MiG-15 was the first jet fighter to be mass produced by the MiG Design Bureau and over the years the name MiG has become virtually synonymous with Soviet fighter. MiG is actually an acronym made up of the last names of the two men heading thedesign bureau, Artjom Ivanovich Mikoyan and Mikhail tosifovich Gurevich. The MiG Bureau was founded on 25 December 1939 at State Aircraft Factory Number 1,Osoaviachim at Frunse airfield on the outskirts of Moscow and during the Great Patriotic War (World War II) developed a number of fighters with impressive performance. None, other than the MiG-3, ever progressed beyond the prototype stage and MiG fighters were overshadowed by the designs of...

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No. 116 - MiG-15 in action

Aircraft in Action Hans-Heiri Stapfer

During November of 1950. United Nations fighter pilots over North Korea encountered a formidable swept-wing high performance jet fighter. which was quickly identified as the Soviet-built MiG-15. Almost overnight the name MiG became infamous inthe West, as Sabres and MiG-15s clashed over "MiG Alley." The MiG-15 was the first jet fighter to be mass produced by the MiG Design Bureau and over the years the name MiG has become virtually synonymous with Soviet fighter. MiG is actually an acronym made up of the last names of the two men heading thedesign bureau, Artjom Ivanovich Mikoyan and Mikhail tosifovich Gurevich. The MiG Bureau was founded on 25 December 1939 at State Aircraft Factory Number 1,Osoaviachim at Frunse airfield on the outskirts of Moscow and during the Great Patriotic War (World War II) developed a number of fighters with impressive performance. None, other than the MiG-3, ever progressed beyond the prototype stage and MiG fighters were overshadowed by the designs of...

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No. 121 - Hawker Hunter in Action

Aircraft in Action Glenn Ashley

There is currently a trend toward designing multi-role aircraft that can carry out a number of different missions and roles. This trend is mainly due to the fact that most countries cannot afford the research and development costs associated with designing separate aircraft for each mission. In the years immediately following the Second World War this was not the case. Most countries designed aircraft to meet specific missions and roles. Multi-role jet aircraft, with few exceptions, did not really exist until the advent of the Hawker Hunter. The Hunter can be classed as the world's first multi-role jet combat aircraft. It was used as an air superiority fighter, ground attack aircraft, photo reconnaissance aircraft and trainer. The cost of producing an aircraft today that could fill these same roles, with the longevity of the Hunter, would be considerable and for most countries such a project would be cost prohibitive. During 1945, many of the aircraft in front line RAF service...

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No. 121 - Hawker Hunter in Action

Aircraft in Action Glenn Ashley

There is currently a trend toward designing multi-role aircraft that can carry out a number of different missions and roles. This trend is mainly due to the fact that most countries cannot afford the research and development costs associated with designing separate aircraft for each mission. In the years immediately following the Second World War this was not the case. Most countries designed aircraft to meet specific missions and roles. Multi-role jet aircraft, with few exceptions, did not really exist until the advent of the Hawker Hunter. The Hunter can be classed as the world's first multi-role jet combat aircraft. It was used as an air superiority fighter, ground attack aircraft, photo reconnaissance aircraft and trainer. The cost of producing an aircraft today that could fill these same roles, with the longevity of the Hunter, would be considerable and for most countries such a project would be cost prohibitive. During 1945, many of the aircraft in front line RAF service...

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No. 119 - OS2U Kingfisher in action

Aircraft in Action Al Adcock

Before the advent of radar, the scout/observation aircraft served as the eyes of the fleet. Scouting hundreds of miles either from a shore base or from a ship these aircraft were used to observe submarine and/or surface ship movements, act as gunfire spotters for surface ships, and act as air-sea rescue platforms. The Chance Vought Aircraft Company came into existence during 1917, producing trainer aircraft for the U.S. Army. Later the Lewis and Vought VE-7 series of aircraft was procured by the Navy. The VE-7 series developed into the VE-9 with one model, the VE9H, being produced as a single float observation aircraft (four were built for the Navy). During the 1920s Vought brought out the UO-1, a variant of the VE-9. The aircraft was powered by a 220 hp Wright J-5 engine and a total of 141 UO-ls were built. These became the first service aircraft to operate from the deck of an aircraft carrier and were also the first aircraft to operate from a battleship catapult. The UO-1 was...

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No. 119 - OS2U Kingfisher in action

Aircraft in Action Al Adcock

Before the advent of radar, the scout/observation aircraft served as the eyes of the fleet. Scouting hundreds of miles either from a shore base or from a ship these aircraft were used to observe submarine and/or surface ship movements, act as gunfire spotters for surface ships, and act as air-sea rescue platforms. The Chance Vought Aircraft Company came into existence during 1917, producing trainer aircraft for the U.S. Army. Later the Lewis and Vought VE-7 series of aircraft was procured by the Navy. The VE-7 series developed into the VE-9 with one model, the VE9H, being produced as a single float observation aircraft (four were built for the Navy). During the 1920s Vought brought out the UO-1, a variant of the VE-9. The aircraft was powered by a 220 hp Wright J-5 engine and a total of 141 UO-ls were built. These became the first service aircraft to operate from the deck of an aircraft carrier and were also the first aircraft to operate from a battleship catapult. The UO-1 was...

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No. 115 - F-117 Stealth in action

Aircraft in Action Jim Goodall

The Lockheed Advanced Development Projects (ADP), better known by its nickname — the Skunk Works, has over the years built an aerospace design team capable of achieving what can truly be called incredible feats of aircraft design and development. When Kelly Johnson first conceived the U-2, nobody thought that it was possible to build a jet powered glider that could reach and maintain 80,000 feet. When the original Blackbird (the A-12/YF-12/SR-71) was conceived during 1958/59, an aircraft that could fly at Mach 3.2 at or above 90,000 feet was totally unheard of. One of the major problem areas faced by the Air Force during Viet Nam was the loss of a large number of aircraft to radar-guided guns and surface-to-air missiles. One way to reduce these losses was to reduce the radar cross section of the attack aircraft itself. Current designs did not allow stealth technology to be applied, with the exception of the B-1 bomber. The B-1A had a radar cross section (RCS) of approximately 10...

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No. 115 - F-117 Stealth in action

Aircraft in Action Jim Goodall

The Lockheed Advanced Development Projects (ADP), better known by its nickname — the Skunk Works, has over the years built an aerospace design team capable of achieving what can truly be called incredible feats of aircraft design and development. When Kelly Johnson first conceived the U-2, nobody thought that it was possible to build a jet powered glider that could reach and maintain 80,000 feet. When the original Blackbird (the A-12/YF-12/SR-71) was conceived during 1958/59, an aircraft that could fly at Mach 3.2 at or above 90,000 feet was totally unheard of. One of the major problem areas faced by the Air Force during Viet Nam was the loss of a large number of aircraft to radar-guided guns and surface-to-air missiles. One way to reduce these losses was to reduce the radar cross section of the attack aircraft itself. Current designs did not allow stealth technology to be applied, with the exception of the B-1 bomber. The B-1A had a radar cross section (RCS) of approximately 10...

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No. 113 - Junkers Ju 88 in action, Part 2

Aircraft in Action Brian Filley

When Adolf Hitler's Reichsluftfahrtministerium (State Aviation Ministry - RLM) issued a specification fora Schnellbomber (fast bomber) to Germany's aviation industry during 1935, it simultaneously created Germany's most important wartime bomber, as well as one of its most popular heavy fighters. The Junkers Ju 88, designed by the Junkers Flugzeug and Moterenwerke A.G. of Dessau. Germany, not only surpassed the RLM's expectations as a multi-purpose medium bomber, but ultimately excelled as a Tag Zerstorer (day destroyer) and Schwerer Nachtjager (heavy night-fighter), a role which the Third Reich would later desperately need. By the end of the war, approximately 3,964 Ju 88 fighters had been manufactured out of a total of 15.000 machines. or just over twenty-five percent of the total Ju 88 production run. When the prototype Ju 88V-1 first flew on 21 December 1936, there was no thought of using the aircraft as a fighter. It soon became obvious, however, that the Ju 88 possessed...

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No. 112 - MiG-29 Fulcrum in Action

Aircraft in Action Hans-Heiri Stapfer

The MiG-29 Fulcrum made its Western public debut during the Summer of 1986 and has since become one of the best known Soviet fighters. With the advent of the MiG-29 the Soviets had a fighter that was not only equal in performance and handling to Western aircraft, it was in some areas superior. As part of President Gorbachev's Glasnost policy, MiG-29s have made a number of appearances in the West. The requirement for a new generation of combat fighters. a requirement that would eventually lead to the MiG-29 and Su-27, was issued by the Kremlin during the late 1960s. The Soviet Min istr• of Defense issued the general design layouts for two different sized fighter aircraft. The Sukhoi design bureau was entrusted with the development of the larger aircraft, a long range interceptor intended for the Soviet Air Defense Force (111/0). This project was called T-10 by the Sukhoi design bureau and later emerged as the Su-27 Flanker. which is considered to be the Soviet counterpart of the F...

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No. 112 - MiG-29 Fulcrum in Action

Aircraft in Action Hans-Heiri Stapfer

The MiG-29 Fulcrum made its Western public debut during the Summer of 1986 and has since become one of the best known Soviet fighters. With the advent of the MiG-29 the Soviets had a fighter that was not only equal in performance and handling to Western aircraft, it was in some areas superior. As part of President Gorbachev's Glasnost policy, MiG-29s have made a number of appearances in the West. The requirement for a new generation of combat fighters. a requirement that would eventually lead to the MiG-29 and Su-27, was issued by the Kremlin during the late 1960s. The Soviet Min istr• of Defense issued the general design layouts for two different sized fighter aircraft. The Sukhoi design bureau was entrusted with the development of the larger aircraft, a long range interceptor intended for the Soviet Air Defense Force (111/0). This project was called T-10 by the Sukhoi design bureau and later emerged as the Su-27 Flanker. which is considered to be the Soviet counterpart of the F...

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No. 111 - Panavia Tornado in Action

Aircraft in Action Glenn Ashley

The Panavia Tornado had its beginnings on 6 April 1965 (Budget Day in Great Britain) when the Chancellor, James Callaghan, rose in the House of Commons to announce that development costs of English Electric TSR-2 were so high that the project was cancelled. This decision left Britain without a tactical strike and reconnaissance aircraft, and it was stated that the Royal Air Force would purchase a number of General Dynamics F-111s to fill the requirement. This decision was than lived, since the F-111 suffered from a number of technical difticulties as well as risingcostw and the RAF never took delivery of the General Dynamics aircraft. The TSR-2 had been developed as a replacement for the Canberra bomber and was one of the most advanced strike aircraft under development in the West. In the low-level strike role, the TSR-2 would have been capable of sorties at 200 feet maximum altitude and at speeds in excess of 0.9 Mach while carrying either nuclear or conventional weapons. At...

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No. 110 - Sopwith Fighters in action

Aircraft in Action Peter Cooksley , Peter G. Cooksley

By the time the First World War started in August of 1914, Thomas Sopwith had already distinguished himself in the aviation world by setting an amazing number of aerial records. He had crowned these accomplishments with the establishment of the Sopwith Aviation Company. His company went on to produce an aircraft which won for Great Britain much coveted Schneider Trophy (in the second of the Schneider races). Indeed, the future seemed bright for the Sopwith Company in the sporting field, with an entry submitted for the Aerial Derby and plans in motion to compete in the LondonParis-London Air Race. All of these plans quickly vanished with the outbreak of war, with military orders fully occupying the output of the two Kingston factories for the next four years. The first Sopwith aircraft to go to war were also among the earliest military machines to be taken on strength by the Royal Naval Air Service. After the opening of hostilities, a pair of standard Sopwith Tabloids, a Tractor...

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No. 110 - Sopwith Fighters in action

Aircraft in Action Peter Cooksley , Peter G. Cooksley

By the time the First World War started in August of 1914, Thomas Sopwith had already distinguished himself in the aviation world by setting an amazing number of aerial records. He had crowned these accomplishments with the establishment of the Sopwith Aviation Company. His company went on to produce an aircraft which won for Great Britain much coveted Schneider Trophy (in the second of the Schneider races). Indeed, the future seemed bright for the Sopwith Company in the sporting field, with an entry submitted for the Aerial Derby and plans in motion to compete in the LondonParis-London Air Race. All of these plans quickly vanished with the outbreak of war, with military orders fully occupying the output of the two Kingston factories for the next four years. The first Sopwith aircraft to go to war were also among the earliest military machines to be taken on strength by the Royal Naval Air Service. After the opening of hostilities, a pair of standard Sopwith Tabloids, a Tractor...

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No. 127 - deHavilland Mosquito in action Part 1

Aircraft in Action Jerry Scutts

Nearly fifty years after the end of the most destructive war in history, veterans of WW II still recall the finer points of the aircraft they flew. The passage of time probably makes them remember the aircraft's good qualities far more then the bad points and that is quite understandable lot would also depend on the aircraft being recalled. If it was the de Havilland Mosquito, there weren't many bad qualities to begin with! The"Mossie" is still held in high esteem by the British, Dominion and American aircrews who were fortunate enough to fly this superlative warplane. Stories told of the Mosquito are legion, but some are particularly appropriate. There was the time when a B-26 Marauder crew met a Mosquito over England. The "word" had gotten around that de Havilland had developed a bomber that was faster than most fighters, let alone bombers. The B-26 crew was not convinced and a race of sorts resulted. They knew that their ship had a high top speed and the anonymous RAF crewwere...

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No. 127 - deHavilland Mosquito in action Part 1

Aircraft in Action Jerry Scutts

Nearly fifty years after the end of the most destructive war in history, veterans of WW II still recall the finer points of the aircraft they flew. The passage of time probably makes them remember the aircraft's good qualities far more then the bad points and that is quite understandable lot would also depend on the aircraft being recalled. If it was the de Havilland Mosquito, there weren't many bad qualities to begin with! The"Mossie" is still held in high esteem by the British, Dominion and American aircrews who were fortunate enough to fly this superlative warplane. Stories told of the Mosquito are legion, but some are particularly appropriate. There was the time when a B-26 Marauder crew met a Mosquito over England. The "word" had gotten around that de Havilland had developed a bomber that was faster than most fighters, let alone bombers. The B-26 crew was not convinced and a race of sorts resulted. They knew that their ship had a high top speed and the anonymous RAF crewwere...

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No. 123 - BE2 in action

Aircraft in Action Peter Cooksley

In 1909, the British War Office decided to abandon development of powered aircraft at His Majesty's Balloon Factory in Farnborough, Hampshire and to dispense with the services of the factory's two designers, S. F. Cody and J. W. Dunne. Their reasoning was that the whole program had proved to be far too costly. By December of the following year, they realized that this decision had been a serious mistake and a new aircraft was purchased from Mr. Geoffrey de Havilland, who was also appointed assistant designer and test pilot. One of his responsibilities at Farnborough was the repair of damaged aircraft. A crashed Bleriot was sent in for repair and as it turned out, the damage was so extensive that when it rolled out after rebuilding, it was a completely new aircraft with a very different configuration. Mr. de Havilland had used the Bleriot as a test bed to try out his own designs and ideas.

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No. 123 - BE2 in action

Aircraft in Action Peter Cooksley

In 1909, the British War Office decided to abandon development of powered aircraft at His Majesty's Balloon Factory in Farnborough, Hampshire and to dispense with the services of the factory's two designers, S. F. Cody and J. W. Dunne. Their reasoning was that the whole program had proved to be far too costly. By December of the following year, they realized that this decision had been a serious mistake and a new aircraft was purchased from Mr. Geoffrey de Havilland, who was also appointed assistant designer and test pilot. One of his responsibilities at Farnborough was the repair of damaged aircraft. A crashed Bleriot was sent in for repair and as it turned out, the damage was so extensive that when it rolled out after rebuilding, it was a completely new aircraft with a very different configuration. Mr. de Havilland had used the Bleriot as a test bed to try out his own designs and ideas.

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No. 129 - Su-25 Frogfoot in Action

Aircraft in Action Hans-Heiri Stapfer

The Sukhoi Su-25, a high maneuverable, heavily armed, ground attack aircraft, was one of the most potent weapons to come out of the Afghanistan war. It was not only the sheer volume of fire which could be delivered on a target that made the Su-25 so deadly, it was also the high degree of accuracy with which it could be delivered. During the late 1960s, Pavel 0. Sukhoi and his design staff started work on the first drawings for a jet powered Shturmovik as a totally private venture. Sukhoi proposed that it should build a jet powered, heavily armored ground attack aircraft, in the tradition of the 11-2 Shtunnovik. This proposal was unusual in that it broke with traditional Soviet procurement procedures. Normally, a requirement for a new aircraft was submitted by the Ministry of Defense and the WS (Voenno Vozdushnye Sili, Air Forces) to the MAP (Ministerstvo Aviatsionnoi Promyshlennostil, Ministry for Aircraft Production) and then to the different aircraft design bureaus/manufacturers...

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No. 126 - F-86 Sabre in action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

SABREJET! — That word instantly brings to mind thoughts of silver swept wing jets locked in mortal combat in the skies over Korea. But the North American Aviation (NAA) F-86 Sabre was much more than that. Not only was it the best clear-air fighter in the world at that time, the basic design would evolve into the only production single seat all-weather jet interceptor, an atomic capable fighter-bomber and a carrier-based fleet interceptor and fighter-bomber for the Navy. The F-86 series was built by many different manufacturers throughout the Free World and served to counter the Soviet threat during the 1950s. The F-86 Sabre was just one of the superb designs to come from North American Aviation. During the 1940s and 1950s North American literally"owned" the military aircraft sales market, not just in America, but throughout the Free World. This aviation giant began life as a holding company in the early 1930s with no designs of its own. Originally founded in 1928, the company was...

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No. 126 - F-86 Sabre in action

Aircraft in Action Larry Davis

SABREJET! — That word instantly brings to mind thoughts of silver swept wing jets locked in mortal combat in the skies over Korea. But the North American Aviation (NAA) F-86 Sabre was much more than that. Not only was it the best clear-air fighter in the world at that time, the basic design would evolve into the only production single seat all-weather jet interceptor, an atomic capable fighter-bomber and a carrier-based fleet interceptor and fighter-bomber for the Navy. The F-86 series was built by many different manufacturers throughout the Free World and served to counter the Soviet threat during the 1950s. The F-86 Sabre was just one of the superb designs to come from North American Aviation. During the 1940s and 1950s North American literally"owned" the military aircraft sales market, not just in America, but throughout the Free World. This aviation giant began life as a holding company in the early 1930s with no designs of its own. Originally founded in 1928, the company was...

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No. 124 - C-123 Provider in Action

Aircraft in Action Al Adcock

Assault and intra-theater transport aircraft have played a major role in every conflict since their development just before the start of the Second World War. Both powered aircraft and gliders have been used to deliver assault troops to the battlefield and to keep them resupplied with the tools needed to make war. In the years just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War, German, British and American aircraft designers all developed military (or modified civilian aircraft) for the troop carrier/assault transport role. The Germans developed the Junkers Ju 52 while the British and Americans mainly used the Douglas C-47 (a military version of the DC-3 airliner). Assault and cargo glider forces got their start during the war when the Germans used assault gliders on 10 May 1940 against the Kanne, Veldmezelt and Vroenkonen bridges in Holland. The success of these operations caught the attention of a number of aircraft manufacturers who began to design their own assault gliders....

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No. 124 - C-123 Provider in Action

Aircraft in Action Al Adcock

Assault and intra-theater transport aircraft have played a major role in every conflict since their development just before the start of the Second World War. Both powered aircraft and gliders have been used to deliver assault troops to the battlefield and to keep them resupplied with the tools needed to make war. In the years just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War, German, British and American aircraft designers all developed military (or modified civilian aircraft) for the troop carrier/assault transport role. The Germans developed the Junkers Ju 52 while the British and Americans mainly used the Douglas C-47 (a military version of the DC-3 airliner). Assault and cargo glider forces got their start during the war when the Germans used assault gliders on 10 May 1940 against the Kanne, Veldmezelt and Vroenkonen bridges in Holland. The success of these operations caught the attention of a number of aircraft manufacturers who began to design their own assault gliders....

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No. 142 - Focke-Wulf Fw 189 in action

Aircraft in Action George Punka

In the February of 1937 the Technische Amt (Technical Office) of the Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM ) opened competition for a new aircraft to replace the Luftwaffe's current reconnaissance aircraft that equipped the Aufklarungsstqffeln (H) (tactical reconnaissance squadrons) . Up until this time, the Luftwaffe had used the Heinkel He 46 for this role, but this aircraft was rapidly becoming obsolete. The He 46 filled the reconnaissance mission with excellent downward visibility and good slow speed handling. In 1935, Henschel offered the HS 122 as a replacement for the He 46; however, the aircraft was only some six mph (10 km/h ) faster than the earlier aircraft. The Hs 122's 167 mph top speed (270 km/h) was deemed to be insufficient and Henschel rebuilt the prototype, using a more powerful engine and improved airframe. This prototype evolved into the Hs 126 high wing, two seat tactical reconnaissance aircraft. The speed of the prototype was now some 208 mph (335 km/h) with all...

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No. 142 - Focke-Wulf Fw 189 in action

Aircraft in Action George Punka

In the February of 1937 the Technische Amt (Technical Office) of the Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM ) opened competition for a new aircraft to replace the Luftwaffe's current reconnaissance aircraft that equipped the Aufklarungsstqffeln (H) (tactical reconnaissance squadrons) . Up until this time, the Luftwaffe had used the Heinkel He 46 for this role, but this aircraft was rapidly becoming obsolete. The He 46 filled the reconnaissance mission with excellent downward visibility and good slow speed handling. In 1935, Henschel offered the HS 122 as a replacement for the He 46; however, the aircraft was only some six mph (10 km/h ) faster than the earlier aircraft. The Hs 122's 167 mph top speed (270 km/h) was deemed to be insufficient and Henschel rebuilt the prototype, using a more powerful engine and improved airframe. This prototype evolved into the Hs 126 high wing, two seat tactical reconnaissance aircraft. The speed of the prototype was now some 208 mph (335 km/h) with all...

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No. 139 - Mosquito in action pt 2

Aircraft in Action Jerry Scutts

With the flight testing of the Mosquito prototype ongoing, official Air Ministry skepticism over the capabilities of the wooden aircraft quickly melted away and suddenly, the aircraft was required for every conceivable operational role. One of the more important roles envisioned for the Mosquito was that of high speed night fighter, to replace the aging and slow Blenheim IF and to supplement the Bristol Beaufighter. The prototype Mosquito F Mk 11 (W4052) was ordered under Specification P.21/40 during 1940. This specification called for replacing the observer/bomb aimers glass nose with a solid nose containing an armament of four .303 inch Browning machine guns. Additionally, four 20MM Hispano cannon were installed under the cabin floor in the space normally taken up by the bomb bay. Lastly, a gun camera was mounted in the nose that operated automatically whenever the guns were fired (it could also be operated independently by a switch located next to the gun button on the control...

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No. 135 - F-104 Starfighter in Action

Aircraft in Action Phillip Freddell

The Lockheed F-104 Starfighter has proven itself to be one of the world's great aviation enigmas, a special purpose fighter never used as its designers intended, yet possessing performance far in excess of that found in any of its contemporaries. Designed as a relatively inexpensive, simple air superiority fighter. the F-104, in the end, was neither particularly cheap or simple. Yet it soldiers on in the air forces of several nations, a tribute both to its concept and its design, which dates back to the Communist invasion of South Korea. The Korean War was an eye opener for the United States Air Force. Initially, USAF planners anticipated fighting an obsolescent Communist air arm armed with pistonengined fighters. The introduction of the MiG-15 came as a rude shock to the United Nations' air forces. Superior to all combat aircraft in Korea except the F-86 Sabre, the MiG-15 proved both an embarrassment and a source of considerable concern to the Air Force. Although inferior to the...

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No. 135 - F-104 Starfighter in Action

Aircraft in Action Phillip Freddell

The Lockheed F-104 Starfighter has proven itself to be one of the world's great aviation enigmas, a special purpose fighter never used as its designers intended, yet possessing performance far in excess of that found in any of its contemporaries. Designed as a relatively inexpensive, simple air superiority fighter. the F-104, in the end, was neither particularly cheap or simple. Yet it soldiers on in the air forces of several nations, a tribute both to its concept and its design, which dates back to the Communist invasion of South Korea. The Korean War was an eye opener for the United States Air Force. Initially, USAF planners anticipated fighting an obsolescent Communist air arm armed with pistonengined fighters. The introduction of the MiG-15 came as a rude shock to the United Nations' air forces. Superior to all combat aircraft in Korea except the F-86 Sabre, the MiG-15 proved both an embarrassment and a source of considerable concern to the Air Force. Although inferior to the...

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No. 146 - H-34 Choctaw in action

Aircraft in Action Lennart Lundh

In 1952. practical military helicopters were barely a decade old: however, the strides made in that time had been phenomenal. The limited-range, small-payload aircraft introduced in wartime Europe and America had given way to such types as the Sikorsky H-I9 and Piasecki H-2I. The former, first flown on 10 November 1949. was proving to be a capable performer in the war on the Korean peninsula. The latter, just entering production, was in great demand from the Air Force and Army. Moving troops or hauling cargo. carrying out rescues or protecting the Fleet, the helicopter's potential was unlimited. The HO4S-1, as the Navy designated the F1-19, was in use with the Fleet as an anti-submarine warfare aircraft. The first American production ASW helicopter, its success in creating doctrine and tactics also highlighted its shortcomings. Requirements for greater power and longer range caused the Navy to begin searching for the HO4S-l's successor only a year after its introduction. Bell and...

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No. 145 - F4U Corsair in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Sullivan

In February of 1938, the U.S. Navy opened design competition for a high speed, high altitude fighter aircraft. Headed by Rex Biesel, Vought's chief engineer, the company set out to produce the finest Naval fighter aircraft of its day. What emerged was the XF4U-1. The Chance Vought XF4U-1 was a single-seat, single-engine monoplane fighter aircraft which was to be powered by a 1,800 hp Pratt & Whitney XR-2800-2 Wasp double row eighteen cylinder air-cooled radial engine. With this power plant it would be the fastest, most powerful aircraft of its type in the world. It was named the Corsair, carrying on a tradition set by at least two other Vought-produced aircraft, which had previously carried the name. The most obvious innovation the design team incorporated into the XF4U-1 was the graceful and efficient inverted gull wing. This wing design allowed the team to use a thirteen foot three blade Hamilton Standard propeller, while allowing the Corsair to utilize landing gear of "...

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No. 143 - MiG-19 Farmer in Action

Aircraft in Action Hans-Heiri Stapfer

The MiG-19 was the ultimate in the line of swept wing fighters designed and built by the MiG Design Bureau, although it was not produced in. the same numbers as the MiG-15 and MiG-17 nor did it remain in front line service for an extended period. The MiG-19 was viewed as an interim fighter developed and built to meet the threat presented by Western supersonic fighters being produced during the early 1950s. The MiG-19 was, in many ways, an outstanding aircraft. It was not only the first mass produced supersonic fighter the world, it also had a fantastic rate of climb, which was not matched by any other Western contemporary design. When compared with its American contemporary, the North American F-100 Super Sabre. the first Western supersonic fighter. the MiG-19 clearly possessed advantages in rate of climb. level speed and landing characteristics. For a short time. the Soviet Union not only reached Western standards. it even surpassed its competitors west of the Iron Curtain. This...

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No. 154 - OV-10 Bronco in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Mesko

During the Second World War the U.S. Marine Corps developed the most effective air-ground support team then in existence based upon the pioneer work the aviators had done in the Central American region during the 1920s and 1930s. This team refined close air-ground support to such an extent that Marines on the ground were able to call in air strikes within incredibly short distances to their most forward troops, helping to reduce casualties against the fanatically dug-in Japanese defenders on numerous islands on the road to Tokyo. Similar tactics were also developed by the Army Air Force in Europe and while differences existed between the two services, a common thread which each shared was the use of light single engined aircraft to locate targets and direct strike aircraft attacks against these targets. These light aircraft were a vital link in effectively using air power to facilitate the advance of ground forces, and without them the effectiveness of air power in this role would...

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No. 152 - Meteor in action

Aircraft in Action Glenn Ashley

Not long after moving to Newmarket the trials team transferred yet again, this time to the Gloster company airfield at Moreton Valence, but also using the option of Barford St John. These allowed the company to use two permanent bases with better facilities and runways. These locations were also much closer to the company's main facilities in Gloucestershire. Barford Saint John was used while Moreton Valence had a hardened runway built and, to keep the project as secret as was possible, Gloster had a separate hangar far removed from the rest of the base, which was used as an Operational Training Unit flying Wellingtons. Whenever the Meteors were flown, the local roads were closed by police. all other flying ceased and Vet), lights were used to indicate the start and finish of test flying. Most flights took place during times when cloud cover was low. reducing the possibility of unauthorized personnel seeing anything they shouldn't. The next aircraft to fly was DG205/G, which was...

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No. 151 - SB2C Helldiver in action

Aircraft in Action Thomas E. Doll

During the late-1930's Curtiss SBC-3 and SBC-4 dive-bombers, operating from Fleet carriers, participated in the early development of United States Naval Aviation. They helped develop the tactics and doctrine of the art of dive-bombing from the time of their entry into Fleet service until 1941, when newer and more capable aircraft began to replace them.

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No. 150 - Sikorsky H-3 Sea King in Action

Aircraft in Action Al Adcock

With its development in the 1940s, the helicopter has taken on many roles previously reserved exclusively for fixed wing aircraft and no other name has been more closely associated with the term helicopter than Sikorsky. In 1919, Igor I. Sikorsky immigrated to the United States following the Russian revolution and by 1923 he had founded the Sikorsky Aero Engineering Corporation on Long Island, New York so he could build the S-29A all metal flying boat. Prior to coming to the United States Sikorsky had worked on helicopter as well as fixed wing designs in his native Russia. Sikorsky fielded many successful designs during the Great War, the First World War, notably the S-16, a two seat reconnaissance aircraft and the S-20, a single seat scout, both were biplanes and were powered by a Gnome rotary engine. The Sikorsky S-29A, the A standing for America, was the first of many successful flying boat designs. Sikorsky went on to build the 5-36. an eight scat amphibian and the 5-40, a...

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No. 148 - A-3 Skywarrior in Action

Aircraft in Action Jim Sullivan

Two major factors combined to bring about the development of the A-3 Skywarrior. The first was the advent of the jet engine and the second was the technology of nuclear weapons. With the development of the Atomic bomb and its tremendous destructive power, it was obvious to the military that nuclear weapons were here to stay. The Army Air Force had the Boeing B-29 Superfortress to deliver a nuclear pay load from land bases, and the U.S. Navy also wanted the capability to deliver such a load from its carrier based force. With the service introduction of the P2V-3C Neptune, the Navy acquired the capability they had sought, but with one severe limitation. The Lockheed Neptune could take off from a carrier deck with the help of JATO (Jet Assisted Take Off). This was demonstrated during March of 1949. The problem was that such a mission would be a one-way trip from the carrier, since the Neptune lacked the capability of landing back aboard and had to reach a land base. The P2V-3C did;...

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No. 164 - deHavilland DH-9 in action

Aircraft in Action Peter Cooksley

There is little doubt that the German air raid carried out in broad daylight on 13 June 1917 made a strong impression on the British War Office, since London itself had been the target. Only eight days later the decision was made to increase the strength of the Royal Flying Corps to a total of ninety-two squadrons, the majority of these to be day-bomber units with which retaliatory attacks could be made against German targets. In that same month a new machine, intended to replace the proven de Havilland 4 bomber, made its first flight at Hendon, North London. This new design was the D.H.9, described as being faster, and capable of carrying a greater load over an increased range. Except for a difference in the nose contours, the D.H.9 closely resembled the earlier D.H.4 bomber, the alterations to the cowling having been brought about by the early adoption of the new and unproven 230 hp Siddeley engine, a lightened version of the B.H.P. (Beardmore- Halford-Pullinger) that powered the...

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Image of F-22 Raptor in Action - Aircraft No. 223

F-22 Raptor in Action - Aircraft No. 223

Aircraft in Action Lou Drendel

The single-seat, twin-engine Lockheed Martin/Boeing F-22 Raptor is the world's first operational fifth-generation fighter. 'Fifth-Generation' denotes a new plateau in fighter design, surpassing the F-15 and Mig-29 capabilities. This volume traces the history of the Raptor and describes in detail why it is likely to be the world's best fighter for years to come. While the Raptor was designed for air superiority, it also embodies ground attack, electronic warfare, and signals intelligence features. After years in planning and development, the US Air Force announced plans to purchase over 600 F-22 Raptors in 1991. Cutbacks in 1993 reduced the number to 442. With the onset of the Obama Administration, Raptor production was capped at 187 units. As challenges to US global leadership mount, however, the Raptor's capabilities will face increasing demand. Illustrated with 169 photographs plus color profiles and detailed line drawings. 56 pages.

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Image of P-38 Lightning in Action - Aircraft No. 222

P-38 Lightning in Action - Aircraft No. 222

Aircraft in Action David Doyle

The development and combat history of the twin-engine, twin-boom, Lockheed P-38 Lightning from the first flight of the XP-38 in January 1939 through a succession of models, ending with the electronic-laden two-seat P-38M. Created on the drawing boards of two of America's most notable aircraft designers - Hall Hibbard and Clarence 'Kelly' Johnson - the P-38 Lightning was the only US pursuit plane to remain in continuous production throughout WWII. In the Southwestern Pacific, the P-38 served as the USAAF's primary long-range fighter prior to the arrival of the P-51D Mustang. Top American air aces and Medal of Honor winners Richard Bong and Thomas McGuire both flew Lightnings, and it was a P-38 that brought down Japanese Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto's plane in April 1943. The Lightning saw service in Europe too, and it was after flying a P-38 to assess the progress of the Normandy Invasion in 1944, that US Lt. Gen. Jimmy Doolittle referred to the Lightning as "the sweetest-flying plane in the sky." Illustrated with nearly 150 period photographs, a third of them rare original color photos, plus color profiles and detailed line drawings. 72 pages.

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Image of B-25 Mitchell in Action - Aircraft No. 221

B-25 Mitchell in Action - Aircraft No. 221

Aircraft in Action David Doyle

The North American B-25 Mitchell was one of the premier US warplanes of WWII. It gained immortality early in the United States' involvement in the war when a small group of B-25Bs under Lt Col Jimmy Doolittle took off from the deck of the USS Hornet and executed a surprise attack on military targets on the Japanese island of Honshu. Subsequently, Mitchells would see service in every US theater of war, doing duty as a tactical bombers, coastal patrol aircraft, photo-reconnaissance and photo-mapping planes, and, when fitted with additional guns and rockets, as superb ground or shipping-attack platforms. The US supplied B-25s to the British Royal Air Force and to the Soviet Union, which flew them against the Nazis on the Eastern Front. Through period photographs and detailed information, the career of the Mitchell is covered from the experimental NA-40 prototype to the final production B-25J model. US Marine Corps PBJ versions are also chronicled. Illustrated with nearly 200 photographs, more than 80 of them rare period photos in original color, plus color profiles and detailed line drawings. 72 pages.

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Image of F4U Corsair in Action - Aircraft No. 220

F4U Corsair in Action - Aircraft No. 220

Aircraft in Action Jim Sullivan

Now updated and expanded, Squadron s just released new edition of the F4U Corsair in Action includes 53 exciting new photographs in 16 all new, additional pages. Bringing to mind the exploits of Pappy Boyington and his Blacksheep Squadron and Tommy Blackburn with the Jolly Rogers, the Corsair is among the most formidable U.S. fighters of World War II. The F4U maintained a kill ratio of 11:1 according to the United States Navy and went on to serve American forces in Korea, holding its own in the early years of the jet age. The Corsair was first conceived as a high-speed, high-altitude fighter for the Navy in 1938 when Chance Vought s design team drew up plans for a fighter with a 1,800 h.p. engine and a huge 13-foot propeller. The Corsair s famous inverted gull wing design was introduced to allow prop clearance. Handling problems delayed the aircraft s deployment aboard carriers, but Marine Corps pilots quickly took to the powerful, rugged fighter and VMF-124, the first Marine squadron to fly the Corsair in combat, also produced the first Corsair air ace, Kenneth A. Walsh, by the summer of 1943. A total of 12,571 Corsairs were built between 1940 and 1952, most of them by Vought, but hundreds by Goodyear and Brewster as those companies assembly lines had to be pressed into service to meet soaring demand for the remarkable aircraft. Jim Sullivan s exhaustive volume surveys the history of the Corsair from its first prototype to the restored warbirds that have continued to delight air show audiences down to the present day. Illustrated with 229 photographs, plus color profiles and detailed line drawings.

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Image of A-10 Warthog in Action - Aircraft No. 218

A-10 Warthog in Action - Aircraft No. 218

Aircraft in Action Lou Drendel

The A-10 Warthog, a twin engine US Air Force ground attack jet, was designed and built from the wheels up for the sole purpose of supporting ground forces. Outwardly ugly and ungainly, the A-10 is one of the most efficient aerial killers ever to take to the sky. Sheathed in 900 pounds of titanium armor, the Warthog - whose official name is the Thunderbolt II - can survive direct hits from armor-piercing and high-explosive projectiles as large as 23mm. It has triple redundancy in its flight control systems, allowing pilots to fly and land when hydraulic power is out or part of a wing has been shot off. Introduced in the mid-1970s, the A-10 has seen service in the Gulf War of 1990-1991; in the Balkans, later in the 1990s; in Afghanistan after 2001; and in the occupation of Iraq, beginning in the spring of 2003. Illustrated with more than 106 photographs, 11 full color paintings, 43 detail drawings and 2 pages of 3-view drawings. 56 pages.

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Image of U.S. Navy UAVs in Action

U.S. Navy UAVs in Action - Aircraft No. 217

Aircraft in Action Ken Neubeck

The development of unmanned aerial vehicles actually predates the development of piloted aircraft. Although manned aircraft more than overtook the unmanned variety in importance throughout the 20th Century, unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs are now poised to become a key component of air warfare. UAV evolved extensively and saw extensive action during Operation Desert Storm - the war against Iraq in 1991 - and since then the floodgates have been opened. The US Navy sees 2 main advantages in using UAVs - endurance and cost effectiveness. UAVs can stay aloft 2 or 3 days and ground operators can be rotated on a regular schedule; they also use less fuel thus reducing operating costs. Newer roles, such as bombing, are also being considered for UAVs, some of which will be equipped to carry a weapon pod or bomb rack, a valuable attribute over high-risk battlegrounds. Illustrated with 170 photographs, plus color profiles and detailed line drawings. 64 pages.

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Image of F6F Hellcat in Action - Aircraft No. 216

F6F Hellcat in Action - Aircraft No. 216

Aircraft in Action Jim Sullivan

During World War II, the United States Navy needed a powerful fighter to counter the Japanese Zero. In combat, Hellcats got more than 5,000 confirmed kills with a 19-to-1 kill ratio. The folding-wing aircraft were capable of operating from carriers or land. Some were equipped with radar for night fighting. The heavily-armed fighters could pack armament including six wing-mounted .50 caliber machine guns, 20mm cannons, wing-mounted rockets and a bomb rack. Later, remote-controlled versions of the aircraft were used to test atomic bomb blasts and as flying bombs. This book takes a detailed look at the F6F Hellcat with about 100 photographs, color profiles and detailed line drawings. 60 pages.

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Image of F/A-18 Hornet in Action - Aircraft Color Series No. 214

F/A-18 Hornet in Action - Aircraft Color Series No. 214

Aircraft in Action Lou Drendel

The F/A-18 Hornet has become the most common aircraft on the decks of US aircraft carriers in the history of naval aviation. While the Super Hornet is a distant relation of the A-D Hornets, they all trace their roots to the loser of the lightweight fighter competition of the early 1970s, the Northrop YF-17. However, the Navy had a requirement for a lightweight fighter to replace the A-7 and F-4 and the US Congress dictated that the Navy choose one of the lightweight fighter contenders as its new fighter/attack aircraft. The twin-engine YF-17 had a definite advantage in this competition; on 2 May 1975, the Navy announced the MDD/Northrop design as the winner. The new lightweight fighter would be built as the F-18. More than 100 photographs, color profiles and detailed line drawings. 52 pages.