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A comprehensive index of Aviation related books magazines and aircraft from around the world

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BELARUS TRAGEDY

Volume 22, Issue 11, November 2009, Air Forces Monthly Magazine (AFM)

Zielinski K

AFM and Krzysztof Zielinski report on the Belarus AF participation at Radom Air Show and the tragic crash there of one of their Su-27UBs.

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The Tudor family - Part 1

Volume 5, Issue 06, 1977, Aeroplane / Aeroplane Monthly

Brian Turpin

Brian Turpin recalls the troubled career of Britains first pressurised airliner

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Image of Winged Defense: The Development and Possibilities of Modern Air Power--Economic and Military (Alabama Fire Ant)

Winged Defense: The Development and Possibilities of Modern Air Power--Economic and Military (Alabama Fire Ant)

William Mitchell

This book is the basis for airpower doctrine in the US, and demonstrates  how forward looking Gen Mitchell was even though the technology for conducting air operations was in its infancy  when it was written.  It is essential reading for anyone concerned with airpower history or aerospace doctrine.

William Lendrum "Billy" Mitchell (December 28, 1879 – February 19, 1936) was an American Army general who is regarded as the father of the U.S. Air Force, and is one of the most famous and most controversial figures in the history of American airpower.

Mitchell served in France during the First World War and, by the conflict's end, commanded all American air combat units in that country. After the war, he was appointed deputy director of the Air Service and began to advocate  increased investment in air power, claiming this would prove vital in future wars. He particularly stressed the ability of bombers to sink battleships and organized a series of dramatic bombing runs against stationary ships designed to test the idea that attracted wide notice from the public.

He antagonized many  in both the Army and Navy with his arguments and criticism and, in 1925, was demoted to Colonel. Later that year, he was court-martialed for insubordination after accusing military chiefs of an "almost treasonable administration of the national defense." He resigned from the service shortly thereafter.

Mitchell received many honors following his death, including a commission by the President as a Major General. He is also the only individual after whom a type of American military aircraft is named: the B-25 "Mitchell."

3/03/2010

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Image of FROM FLEDGLING TO EAGLE: The South African Air Force during the Border War

From Fledgling to Eagle: The South African Air Force During the Border War

Brigadier-General Dick Lord

The crucible of combat over 23 years forged the fledgling South African Air Force into a formidable strike weapon, capable of defeating the best Soviet air defences of the time. From Fledgling to Eagle chronicles the evolution of the SAAF in the 'Border War' that raged in Angola and South West Africa (Namibia) from 1966 to 1989, covering all the major South African Defence Force (SADF) operations from Ongulumbashe to the 'April Fools' Day war' in 1989. Dick Lord, who writes in a 'from the cockpit' style, has drawn on his own first-hand operational reports and diaries, incorporating anecdotes from dozens of aviators from a wide variety of squadrons-Buccaneers, Canberras, Mirages, Impalas, Bosboks, C-160s and -130s, Dakotas and helicopters. He also expands on the close relationship the SAAF had with the ground troops in a variety of operations-such units as the Parabats, Recces and Koevoet.However, Lord studies the broader ramifications of the conflict in that it was not a simple black-white war. Angola was really just a sideshow for the Soviets who wanted to bleed the SAAF in a war of attrition before attempting total domination of South Africa-their ultimate goal. He is unafraid to admit SADF mistakes-of Operations Hooper and Packer he says: "Lines of communications were too long to ably support the battle, which is why we did not clear them off the east bank of the Cuito River and why they captured the three Oliphant tanks which was their only propaganda victory." Although he gives credit to the enemy when they put up a stiff fight, he clearly outlines the overwhelming South African successes and dispels, in accurate detail, all enemy claims by giving an accurate account of each battle. He says: "I agree with General Geldenhuys that we thrashed them severely on the Lomba in '85 and '87 ... much recent publicity has also been given to the so-called victory of the Forces of Liberation [SWAPO, MPLA, and 50,000 Cubans and Soviets] over the SADF at Cuito Cuanavale in 1988. Nothing could be further from the truth-it is blatant propaganda." Brigadier-General Dick Lord joined the Royal Navy as an air cadet in 1958, where he qualified as a fighter pilot. Flying Sea Venoms and Sea Vixens, he served on board the aircraft carriers Centaur, Victorious, Hermes and Ark Royal on cruises around the world. In the mid '60s, he was selected for a two-year exchange tour with the US Navy, flying A4 Skyhawks and F4 Phantoms out of San Diego, California. He completed tours of air warfare instruction, flying Hunters out of the naval air stations at Lossiemouth, Scotland and Brawdy, Wales. He returned to South Africa in early '70s and joined the South African Air Force (SAAF), flying Impalas, Sabres and Mirage IIIs. During the Border War, he commanded 1 Squadron, flying Mirage F1AZs into Angola, followed by running air force operations out of Oshikati, Windhoek and SAAF Headquarters in Pretoria. A highlight of his career was organizing the successful fly-past of 76 aircraft for Nelson Mandela's inauguration as President of South Africa in 1994.

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Image of British Fighter Units: Western Front 1917-1918 (Osprey Airwar 18)

British Fighter Units: Western Front 1917-1918 (Osprey Airwar 18)

Alex Revell

This book traces the combat history of British fighter units. Major aircraft types are all covered, and their missions detailed. Aircraft markings and aircrew uniforms are shown in full colour illustrations.

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Deploy and Defend in Malaysia

Volume 23 Issue 07, 1990, Aircraft illustrated

Paul Jackson

Paul Jackson accompanies the RAF detachment to Butterworth in Malaysia for a Far East air defence exercise

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Image of Hurricane: Victor of the Battle of Britain

Hurricane: Victor of the Battle of Britain. Leo McKinstry

Leo McKinstry

In the summer of 1940 the fate of Europe hung in the balance. Victory in the forthcoming air battle would mean national survival; defeat would establish German tyranny. The Luftwaffe greatly outnumbered the RAF, but during the Battle of Britain it was the RAF that emerged triumphant, thanks to two key fighter planes, the Spitfire and the Hurricane. The Hurricane made up over half of Fighter Command's front-line strength, and its revolutionary design transformed the RAF's capabilities. Leo McKinstry tells the story of the remarkable plane from its designers to the first-hand testimonies of those brave pilots who flew it; he takes in the full military and political background but always keeps the human stories to the fore - to restore the Hawker Hurricane to its rightful place in history.

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Island Dressing

Volume 30 Issue 12, 1997, Aircraft illustrated

Geoffrey P Jones

Following the transformation of half its fleet into aerial billboards, Geoffrey P. Jones catches up with developments at Aurigny Air Services on the eve of the carrier's 30th anniversary

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